Key Concept #59 Teng Translated into Chinese

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC59: Teng, written by Todd Sandel, in English in 2015, and now translated into both traditional and simplified Chinese by Bei Ju (Jenny), both of the University of Macau, China.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail of the translation you wish to read. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC59 Teng Chinese-trad
Traditional Chinese
KC59 Teng Chinese-simplified
Simplified Chinese

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sandel, T. (2016). Teng [Traditional Chinese]. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 59 (B. Ju, Trans.) Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2016/06/kc-59-teng-chinese-trad.pdf

Sandel, T. (2016). Teng [Simplified Chinese]. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 59 (B. Ju, Trans.) Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2016/06/kc-59-teng-chinese-sim.pdf

The goal of the translation project is to expand the concepts available to discussions of intercultural dialogue beyond those who are fluent in English. What began with a request to translate a few concepts into 2 languages has now developed into a serious effort to translate most of them. Choice of languages was left up to those who are doing the work, which has prompted much interesting discussion about whether to be organized about this (translating all of them into a single language, then moving on to the next). Obviously the decision was  not to take that route. Instead, authors are being given the opportunity to translate their own into whatever languages they know best; once they respond, their concepts are put on a list of those available to requests from others. If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concept #59: Teng by Todd Sandel

Key Concepts in ICDThe next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. This is KC59: Teng by Todd Sandel. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists organized  chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

Key Concept #59 Teng by Todd Sandel

Sandel, T. (2015). Teng. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 59. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2015/04/key-concept-teng.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

University of Macau

On April 15, 2013 I gave a talk entitled: “Asking cultural questions: Using ethnography to answer questions about cultural identity” for the Department of Communication at the University of Macau. The topic and case studies provided were related to my research.

UMacau-class

On April 16, 2013, I gave another talk in the Department, entitled “Intercultural dialogue: Catching up to the practitioners.” This talk was related to the Center for Intercultural Dialogue.

small-416 poster

My thanks to Dr. Todd Sandel for organizing these events, and for all the time spent showing me around Macau, and to his students and colleagues for providing such a good audience, and asking provocative questions.

Sandel and graduate students with Leeds-Hurwitz
Sandel and graduate students with Leeds-Hurwitz

While at the University of Macau, I had the opportunity to connect with Dr. Martin Montgomery (Chair Professor and Head of Department), Dr. Timothy Simpson (Associate Dean, Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities), Dr. TAN See Kam, Dr. Annie YANG, Dr. Ozge GIRIT, Dr. Mike Chinoy, and Dr. Andrew Moody. As Dr. Ingrid Piller (at Macquarie University in Australia) also happened to be present to give a talk of her own, I also was able to meet her. I am looking forward to continuing the conversations started on this trip.

Being in Macau was particularly interesting given the combination of Chinese and Portuguese influences on the city. Whether on campus or elsewhere, most signs provide information in Chinese and Portuguese, and often English as well, as documented below.

UMacaulogo

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

Ethnography of Comm conference 2012

The “Ethnography of Communication: Ways Forward” conference was held June 10-14, 2012, at Creighton University, in Omaha, Nebraska. Dr. Jay Leighter was the conference organizer, together with Dr. Donal Carbaugh; the National Communication Association sponsored the event as one of its summer conferences (along with funding from several parts of Creighton University).

I presented a paper co-authored with Dr. Patricia Lambert, of the Institut Français de l’Éducation in Lyon, entitled “A Prophet Abroad? The Impact of Hymes’ Notion of Communicative Competence in France and French-speaking Switzerland.” In addition, I was invited to participate in two roundtable discussions, one on “Ethnography of Communication Theory and Methodology: Taking Stock and Ways Forward” and the other “Ways Forward: Institutes, Centers, and Affiliations.” In the latter, I was invited to present a description of this Center, which resulted in many new “likes” to the Center’s facebook page.

Many of those participating in the conference are included in the following photo (though certainly several critical people are missing, including Dr. Gerry Philipsen and Dr. Donal Carbaugh).

One of the pleasures of the conference for me was the presence of so many of those involved in the NCA Summer Conference on Intercultural Dialogue, held in Istanbul in 2009, which led to the creation of this Center. This included several from the organizing committee (Drs. Tamar Katriel, Donal Carbaugh, Kristine Fitch Muñoz, and Saskia Witteborn), one of the guest speakers (Lisa Rudnick) and several of the participants (Drs. Todd Sandel, Chuck Braithwaite, Evelyn Ho, Eric Morgan, and Tabitha Hart). Another was catching up with Dr. Susan Poulsen, who organized “Ways of Speaking, Ways of Knowing: Ethnography of Communication” in Portland in 1992, the predecessor conference to this one in terms of topic. Other joys of the week included having time to connect with people I had not seen in a long time, previously only had met through correspondence, or students of my colleagues who I did not know at all.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

Todd Sandel – Fulbright

Todd Sandel
University of Macau

Fulbright to Taiwan

From 2007-2008 I had the privilege of being a Fulbright Scholar in the traditional, 10 month, program to Taiwan. I was hosted by my friend and former University of Illinois classmate, Dr. Chung-Hui Liang at the Center for General Education, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu. We collaborated on a study of a recent trend in international migration, namely the rise in the number of “foreign brides” from such places as Mainland China, Vietnam, Cambodia, and Indonesia, who through commercial brokers and/or personal connections, marry men in Taiwan. I continue to collaborate with Dr. Liang and work on this project.

Another wonderful benefit of the Fulbright Program is the financial support it provides for family members. (Be aware, however, that family member benefits are covered by the host country and vary.) My spouse and children joined me and we all had a wonderful time of cultural and language learning. Our youngest daughter became fluent in Mandarin Chinese at the primary school she attended, and my two older children, whose tuition at an American school in Taichung was paid by Fulbright, gained fluency in Chinese and learned a lot of up-to-date slang and popular culture that I was not aware of!

Finally, my Fulbright experience led me to my current position in the Department of Communication at the University of Macau. I attended a conference for all “Greater China” Fulbrighters held in Hong Kong. The last part of the conference included a visit to Macau and the University of Macau. Intrigued by Macau as a place of cultural dynamism and impressed with the university, I made a return visit a couple of months later to give lectures and a longer visit. One thing led to another and this year, 2012, I have a position in Macau. This has opened up opportunities for me to continue to do research in nearby Taiwan, Macau, and nearby provinces of China.

Fulbright can be a life changing experience for you just as it has been for me.

Fulbright Program

FulbrightsThe Fulbright International Exchange Program, under the auspices of the US State Department, offers grants to study, teach and conduct research for U.S. citizens to go abroad and non-U.S. citizens to come to the United States. Different programs are available for faculty members, graduate students, and undergraduates (see links to all the different programs). Although most of the programs are for full years, the Fulbright Specialist Program offers stays of 2-6 weeks. Fulbrights are one of the easiest ways for US academics to connect internationally.

By 2014 Fulbright circulated the following information: “As of last year, lifetime limits on Fulbright Scholar Program grants have been lifted, as have waiting periods between grants. This means more flexibility and opportunity to partake in Fulbright experiences throughout your career; you can participate on a semester-long award and not jeopardize your ability to get back on the Roster or your other future participation.” So for those who have already had one Fulbright, consider requesting another!

A few examples of Communication scholars who have been awarded Fulbrights are listed below. If you have completed any of the varieties of Fulbright awards, and wish to have your description added, send an email with details, or post a comment below.

Mara Adelman – Ethiopia
David L. Altheide – Germany and Portugal
Richard Buttny – Malaysia and India
Kevin Barnhurst – Peru and Italy
Donal Carbaugh – Finland
Kristen Cvancara – Finland
Steven Darian – Uzbekistan
Don Ellis – Israel
Glenn Geiser-Getz (Russia & Ghana)
Phillip Glenn – Moldava
Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz – Portugal
Sheila McNamee – Colombia
Tema Milstein – New Zealand

Jon Nussbaum – Wales
Susan Opt – Czech Republic
Todd Sandel – Taiwan
James Schnell – Cambodia
Stacey K. Sowards – Indonesia
John Parrish-Sprowl – Macedonia and Belarus

Ayseli Usluata – USA (from Turkey)
Paul Voakes – Uganda
Joseph Zompetti – Sri Lanka and Brazil

Study Abroad-China

I will be leading students from the University of Oklahoma on a four-week Study Abroad program in Kunming, China, June 17- July 14. Undergraduate students will take a three hour course that I teach, “Communication in Chinese Cultures” and a three hour course in East-West poetry. Currently this program is open only to students at the University of Oklahoma. However, if you are interested or know of students who might be interested, contact me and we can look into what could possibly be arranged.

We took students to China last summer and had a wonderful time. The city of Kunming is known as the city of “eternal spring” and has great weather, clean air, great food, and fascinating cultures. It is located in Yunnan Province, Southwest China, home to many non-Han ethnic groups. We will take students to Lijiang, home of the Naxi people, and Shangrila, where there are many Tibetans. It’s a great place to spend the summer, learn about China, and broaden your cultural horizons!

Contact me: tlsandel@ou.edu
See also my website: http://faculty-staff.ou.edu/S/Todd.L.Sandel-1/

Todd L. Sandel Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesTodd Sandel (Ph.D., University of Illinois) is Associate Professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Macau and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of International and Intercultural Communication.

He was a Fulbright Scholar to Taiwan 2007-2008, and in 2015 authored the book, Brides on Sale: Taiwanese Cross Border Marriages in a Globalizing Asia, for which he received the “Outstanding Book Award” from the International & Intercultural Division of the National Communication Association (NCA). Sandel has served as Chair of the Language & Social Interaction Division of NCA, President of the Association for Chinese Communication Studies, and Secretary of the Language & Social Interaction (LSI) Division of the International Communication Association (ICA). The paper, “Unpacking and describing interaction on Chinese WeChat: A methodological approach,” co-authored with his students, was awarded the “Top Paper Award” from LSI of ICA in 2018.

His research interests include intercultural communication, Chinese social media, language and social interaction, identity formation, and the ethnography of communication. More recent work, involving the study of affordances of social media, especially in Chinese contexts, has been published in the Journal of Pragmatics, Chinese Journal of Communication, Journal of Intercultural Communication Research, Information Development, and China Media Research. He is also conducting research with students and colleagues in such countries as Indonesia, Japan, and Bhutan.

Select Publications

Sandel, T. L., Ju, B., Ou, C. Y., Wangchuk, D., & Duque, M. (2019). Unpacking and describing interaction on Chinese WeChat: A methodological approach. Journal of Pragmatics, 143, 228-241.

Sandel, T. L., Buttny, R., Varghese, M. (2019). Online interaction across three contexts: An analysis of culture and technological affordances. Journal of Intercultural Communication Research, 48(1), 52-71.

Sandel, T. L. & Ju, B. (forthcoming). Social media, culture, and communication. In J. Oetzel & J. Nussbaum (Eds.) The Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Communication. Oxford University Press.

Ju, B., Sandel, T. L., & Thinyane, H. (in press). WeChat use of Mainland Chinese dual migrants in daily border crossing. Chinese Journal of Communication.

Ju, B., Sandel, T. L., & Fitzgerald, R. (In press). Understanding Chinese internet and social media: The innovative and creative affordances of technology, language and culture. In Marcel Burger (Ed.) Se Mettre en Scène en Ligne’ (Presenting Oneself Online). Cahiers de l’Institut de linguistique et des sciences du langage, No. 58. Lausanne, Switzerland: University of Lausanne.