Fundamental Rights Strategic Litigation Training (Italy)

Applied ICDEIUC is glad to announce the launch of ACTIONES (the multi-stakeholder training session of the EU funded ACTIONES project) open to representatives of non-governmental organisations (NGOs), National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs), Equality Bodies (EBs); judges; public officials; individual litigants.

Fundamental Rights Strategic Litigation à la Carte in the EU ACTIONES Multi-Stakeholder Training

This is the final multi-stakeholder training session of the EU funded ACTIONES project, which targets legal professionals with the aim to explore potential of the Charter of Fundamental Rights as the basis of the strategic litigation. The training puts a specific emphasis on the dynamically growing area of illegal migration and asylum.

THE PROGRAMME

The 3-days training is organised around three main areas. The role of the different actors before, during and after litigation, the role of the different instances at the regional and international levels, and the policy implications of strategic litigation; strategic litigation on the basis of selected fundamental rights protected by the EU Charter, such as non-discrimination, consumer protection, environmental rights; highlights of best practices and challenges from own practice. Case studies on procedural issues relating to public interest litigation will be analysed and the learning will be closed by a simulation exercise.

THE PARTNERS

ACTIONES is coordinated by the European University Institute Centre for Judicial Cooperation and involves the following 16 partner institutions: Association of European Administrative Judges, College of Europe, Croatian Judicial Academy, Estonian Supreme Court, EIUC, National Association of the Romanian Bars, Polish National School of Judiciary and Public Prosecution, Romanian National Institute of Magistracy, Slovenian Judicial training Centre, Spanish General Council for the Judiciary, University of Amsterdam, University of Ljubjana, University of Parma, University of Pompeu Fabra, University of Uppsala, Italian School for the Magistracy.

Registration deadline: 1 August 2017
Course dates: 16-18 October 2017

Venue: EIUC premises in Venice Lido at the Monastery of San Nicolò Admission requirements: Eligible are representatives of non-governmental organisations (NGOs), National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs), Equality Bodies (EBs); judges; public officials; individual litigants.

CFP Communication for Social Justice Activism

Publication OpportunitiesCall for Book Proposals: Communication for Social Justice Activism

Dr. Patricia S. Parker (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) and Dr. Lawrence R. Frey (University of Colorado Boulder) are pleased to announce, as editors, a new book series on “Communication and Social Justice Activism” to be published by the University of California Press.

Communication for social justice activism involves people (including communication researchers, teachers, students, organizational employees, and community members) using communication theories, methods, pedagogies, and other practices to work with and for oppressed, marginalized, and underresourced groups and communities, as well as with activist groups and organizations, to intervene into inequitable systems and make their structures and practices more just.

This book series, thus, offers a new, important, and exciting outlet for communication scholarship that promotes social justice activism in teaching communication courses and in conducting communication research. The goal is to weave social justice activism into all levels of the communication curriculum, with books in this series serving as primary and supplementary texts in undergraduate and graduate communication courses, and as indispensable resources for communication scholars engaging in social justice communication activism teaching and research.

Books Sought: The series will publish three types of books:

1. Textbooks: Briefer and less expensive than typical course textbooks, these books offer a general overview of a topic that is taught as an undergraduate communication course, through a communication for social justice activism lens.

2. Course Content-focused Books: These books focus on particularly important content that is covered in undergraduate and graduate communication courses, serving as supplemental books for those courses.

3. Case Studies: These books examine specific, extended examples of original communication activism studies, in which researchers intervene, working with others, have used communication theories, methods, pedagogies, and other practices to promote social justice.

Amritsar: Conflict & Harmony

Applied ICDAmritsar: Conflict and Harmony
Guest Post by Linda J. de Wit

Amritsar is a medium-sized city in India serving as a tourist destination for two main reasons. First, it is the location of the holiest temple of the Sikh religion; second, it is the closest city to the Wagah border crossing with Pakistan where thousands of visitors assemble to watch the ceremonial closing of the gates every day.

The city and its surroundings have great significance in the history of Partition and the border ceremony is probably the most tangible example of the persistent tensions between the countries separated in 1947. In a remarkably aligned military drill, soldiers on both sides parade up and down, accompanied by hostile looks, aggressive hand gestures, and kicks so high they are basically standing splits. The audiences cheer every move in what almost looks like a dance-off.

When the two flags simultaneously are lowered, a single brief handshake takes place before the border gates are violently slammed shut in the neighbor’s face. The crowds applaud and shout patriotic slogans. The ceremony is a joyful event with music and dancing, having the atmosphere of a sports game. The souvenirs on the Indian side signal that the subject matter is more serious, as they boast about the “world’s largest border guarding force.” Most visitors have probably never been, and will never go, to the other side.

Back in the city, one can visit the Partition museum, the only one in the country. It recounts how the division of British India along religious lines caused millions of people to leave their homes. Amritsar’s train station saw refugees leaving in both directions, as well as packed trains arriving with no one alive, attacked because they were Muslims or Hindus.

A stone’s throw from the museum is a walled garden, Jallianwala Bagh, where a massacre took place by British forces among peaceful protesters in 1919. Gatherings had been forbidden and, without providing a warning, soldiers opened fire on the crowd for ten minutes, killing hundreds. This was one of the events that nourished the independence movement in India.

The city’s main attraction, however, is a different place, drawing more visitors than the Taj Mahal: the Golden Temple. It is the spiritual center of Sikhism because it is where the original version of the religion’s holy book lies. The Temple’s four doors symbolize that people from east, west, north and south can enter the place, irrespective of caste, creed and sex: Sikhism’s fundamental values include absolute equality and the unity of humankind.

The free information booklets distributed around the Temple describe how Sikhism holds that, in essence, all religions are an expression of the same fundamental truth. The founder of Sikhism, Guru Nanak (1469-1539), strove to bring Hindus and Muslims together: “his life and teachings were a symbol of the harmony between the two communities.”[1]

The peaceful ambience of the Temple complex is a heartening change from the city’s gloomier connotations. Tears may spring to the visitor’s eyes, due to mountains of onions being peeled by countless volunteers: every Sikh place of worship has a common kitchen distributing free meals. At the Golden Temple some 75,000 people per day share the same food, sitting together in a row on the floor.

For the moment, such harmony is, on a larger scale, still something to strive for. Last December, the Heart of Asia peace summit took place in Amritsar, but India and Pakistan did not successfully initiate a dialogue process.[2]

The significance of Amritsar in history, as in the present, remains ambiguous. The city is the backdrop of some of the most intense examples of failing intercultural and interreligious dialogue and the consequences thereof. At the same time, as the capital of Sikhism, the city is imbued with the inclusive philosophy of tolerance and unity. For all its contrasts, Amritsar ultimately is a symbol of hope of a better future.

[1] Dr. Sir Radhkrishnan, as cited in: Singh Shan, H. (2015). Sri Guru Granth Sahib. The Unique and Universal Scripture. Dharam Parchar Committee.

[2] http://www.atimes.com/inod-pak-dialogue-process-fails-launch-amritsar/

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PLURAL+ 2017 Youth Video Festival

Applied ICDDo you have something to say about the themes of diversity, migration, social inclusion, and xenophobia? Submit videos less than 5 minutes in length to the PLURAL+ 2017 Youth Video Festival. Deadline: June 4, 2017

PLURAL+ is a joint initiative of the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations (UNAOC) and the International Organization for Migration (IOM) with the support of a wide network of international partners.

View winning videos from past and present PLURAL+ Youth Video Festivals, chosen by an international jury and partners from thousands of submissions from around the globe.

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Venice Academy of Human Rights 2017

Applied ICDThe European Inter-University Centre for Human Rights and Democratisation’s Venice Academy of Human Rights is accepting applications for its summer program. Please have a look at the call for applications and the detailed program on their website.

Key Facts
Theme: Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights as an Answer to Rising Inequalities
Dates: Monday, 3 July – Wednesday, 12 July 2017
Application Deadline: 14 May 2017
Faculty: Branko Milanović (opening lecture), Olivier De Schutter (general course), Wilfried Altzinger, Andreas Føllesdal, Dzidek Kędzia, Miloon Kothari, Manfred Nowak, Kate Pickett, Heisoo Shin
Participants: Academics, practitioners, PhD/JSD and master students
Type of courses: Lectures, seminars, discussion sessions and panel presentations
Number of hours: 34 hours
Venue: EIUC, Monastery of San Nicolò, Venice – Lido, Italy

Economic, Social and Cultural Rights as an Answer to Rising Inequalities
Instead of “the end of history”, we have lived through a major financial crisis, including a debt crisis in Europe that is far from over, and we are currently witnessing threats to democratic governance both from outside and from within the democratic system. Whether these are only temporary setbacks in the global spread of liberal democracy and neoliberal capitalism has to been seen. However, it is reason to pause and reconsider the prospects for economic and social justice against the background of rising inequalities in the world.

The Venice Academy of Human Rights 2017, in co-operation with PluriCourts – Centre of Excellence for the Study of the Legitimate Roles of the Judiciary in the Global Order, looks at these developments from an interdisciplinary perspective that combines law, economics, politics and sociology. Lectures and seminars by the distinguished faculty discuss the question what role do human rights play in enabling and promoting social justice. Are human rights an effective tool for the promotion of economic and social equality? Do human rights impose limits to privatization of particular goods and services? How do human rights enable a just economic and social order? These are but some of the questions that participants of the Academy will discuss in an intense programme over ten days next summer.

Venice Academy of Human Rights
The Venice Academy of Human Rights is an international programme of excellence for human rights education, research and debate. It forms part of the European Inter-University Centre for Human Rights and Democratisation (EIUC).

The Academy offers interdisciplinary thematic programmes open to academics, practitioners, doctoral and master students with an advanced knowledge of human rights. Participants attend morning lectures, participate in discussion sessions and workshops and can exchange views, ideas and arguments with leading international scholars and experts. This includes the opportunity for a number of participants to present and discuss their own “work in progress” such as drafts of articles, chapters of books or doctoral theses and receive comments from faculty members and peers.

At the end of the programme, participants receive a Certificate of Attendance issued by the Venice Academy of Human Rights.

CFP Intercultural Innovation Award 2017

Call for Applications: Intercultural Innovation Award 2017

The call for applications for the 2017 edition of the Intercultural Innovation Award is now open. Deadline for applications: 31 May 2017, 5:00 p.m. EST. The Intercultural Innovation Award is a partnership between the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations (UNAOC) and the BMW Group that aims to select and support the most innovative grassroots projects that encourage intercultural dialogue and cooperation around the world. Download the brochure here.

Eligible to apply for the Intercultural Innovation Award are not-for-profit organizations managing projects focused on promoting intercultural dialogue and understanding, and who are willing to expand their range of action. Examples include projects in the fields of combating xenophobia, education for global citizenship, interfaith dialogue, migration and integration, prevention of violent extremism, as well as initiatives addressing the needs of specific groups in promoting intercultural understanding (e.g. faith-based, youth, women, media, etc.).

Global Campus of Human Rights Contest: Memory & Reconciliation

The Global Campus of Human Rights has launched the third edition of the GC Visual Contest, open to photographers and video-makers, professionals and amateurs, from any part of the world. The goal of the contest is to create synergies between academia, Human Rights defenders and artists to reach a wider international public and foster a better understanding of the issues concerning human rights and their protection.

THE THEME
The visual contest will be open from 1st May and will accept submissions through June 30, 2017. The theme for 2017 is “Memory and Reconciliation”. Memory and how do we envision the past has a potent impact on the creation of the present and future of a country and the current understanding of human rights concerns.
The GC Visual Contest originates from the belief that photography and videos are powerful tools that can raise awareness and push for social change. Furthermore, the purpose of this contest is to create a network of artists, intellectuals and professionals interested in strengthening the protection of human rights and the promotion of democracy and peace.

A collective memory manifests itself in decisions regarding the commemoration of dates, trials of former oppressors, establishment of sites and museums of memory, artworks and memorials and its role in the public education. This photo and video competition seeks to promote reflection on the various collective rememberings and experiences of the past and to which extent it is possible to establish conditions for crime recognition and forgiveness.

DETAILS
The competition will have two category levels, for professional artists and amateurs to which students and Alumni from the Global Campus are particularly encouraged to apply. A number of images and videos will be selected to be displayed on a dedicated online gallery and in connection to GC events/activities ensuring international exposure also thanks to different partners and social media channels. Winners will be determined by an international jury composed of leading experts in the field of photography and documentary filmmaking and of members of the GC network.

The best pictures and short videos could receive special mentions by the partners of the contest and will be presented at the events of the Regional Masters of the Global Campus in Africa, Asia-Pacific, Caucasus, Latin America and the Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, South East Europe.

This initiative is funded by the European Union and receives the patronage of the United Nations Regional Information centre for Western Europe (UNRIC). The Global Campus of Human Rights is a unique network of one hundred participating universities around the world, seeking to advance human rights and democracy through regional and global cooperation for education and research. 

Innovative Ideas for Intercultural Dialogue

I’ve recently read about several interesting ways people are encouraging intercultural dialogues, and wanted to call them to attention here. Readers are invited to post additional stories as comments, or send them in via email so they can be considered as additional posts.

The video “Hijabi” by Mona Haydar has only just been posted, and is already sparking a lot of conversations as a result of the uncommon portrayals of Muslim women dancing to rap music. A story about the videotape, including an interview with Haydar, is available on Huffington Post. Previously, she and her husband put up a sign saying “Ask a Muslim” and answered questions from strangers in Cambridge, MA, as a way of diffusing tensions. Read a story about this on Fusion. Apparently they were influenced by a This American Life episode, “Talk to an Iraqi” in which Haider Newmani set up a booth in cities across the US encouraging strangers to come up and ask him questions.

There have been many other examples as well, such as Firas Alshater, who stood blindfolded in the center of Berlin with a sign saying “I am a Syrian refugee. I trust you. Do you trust me? Hug me.” He went on to post a series of videos about  under the title Zucker (sugar), describing Germany from the point of view of a refugee, with lots of humor.

Recently the Tate Modern in London organized an exhibit entitled Who are We? in order to encourage conversations about the “multiple crises of identity and belonging in Europe and the UK”.

All of these efforts to start intercultural dialogues serve as important beginnings in different contexts. What other projects do you know about? What have you done yourself?

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

Migration Policy Institute 2 Job Ads: Senior Policy Analyst & Research Assistant

  1. Senior Policy Analyst – MPI Europe

The Migration Policy Institute Europe (MPI Europe) is a nonprofit, independent research institute based in Brussels, Belgium that aims to provide a better understanding of migration in Europe and thus promote evidence-based policymaking. MPI Europe provides authoritative research and practical policy design to governmental and nongovernmental stakeholders who seek more effective management of immigration, immigrant integration, and asylum systems as well as successful outcomes for newcomers, families of immigrant background, and receiving communities in Europe. MPI Europe works collaboratively with the International Programme of its sister organisation, the Migration Policy Institute (MPI), based in Washington, DC.

MPI Europe seeks a highly motivated Policy Analyst/Senior Policy Analyst to join its dynamic Brussels team. The successful candidate will demonstrate exceptional writing, editing, and analytical skills and a thorough understanding of European policy frameworks and systems to manage immigration and asylum. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Closing date: 14 April 2017

2. Research Assistant, National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy

The Migration Policy Institute (MPI), a nonpartisan, nonprofit think tank dedicated to the study of national and international migration policies, seeks an exceptional individual to work in its National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy (NCIIP) in Washington, DC. The Research Assistant’s primary responsibilities will be to assist with qualitative and quantitative research and provide programmatic support in several areas of NCIIP’s work. These include, but are not limited to, the ability of adult English/basic education, workforce training, and postsecondary education systems to support the successful integration of first- and second-generation immigrants and refugees.

This position is available immediately. Applications are due by close of business on April 21, 2017.

[For details, follow the links provided]