Imagining Peace by Pádraig Ó Tuama

Applied ICDImagining Peace by Pádraig Ó Tuama.
A TEDx Talk presented on October 18, 2016.

What we need are stories that open up the possibility of relationships where there currently are none.

Pádraig Ó Tuama is a poet and a theologian. In 2011, with Paul Doran, Pádraig co-founded the storytelling event Tenx9 where nine people have up to ten minutes each to tell a true story from their lives. From 2014-2019, Pádraig led the Corrymeela Community, Ireland’s oldest peace and reconciliation organisation. Pádraig brings interest in religion, conflict and language to his work. Originally from Cork, he had a nomadic decade (Australia, Lithuania, Switzerland, the Philippines, Uganda) before settling in Belfast in 2003.

Bruno Catalano Les Voyageurs Sculptures

Applied ICDSculptor Bruno Catalano creates life-size, bronze sculptures titled “Les Voyageurs” (The Travelers). These serve as a visual depiction of the disruption caused by migration.

Catalano was born in Morocco to a Sicilian family, and raised in France, so knows the issues first hand.

Further reading:

Bruno Catalano website.

Waldmann, Nadine. (20 July 2018). Not all there – the enigmatic sculptures of Bruno Catalano. Daily Art Magazine.

Black International Cinema Berlin Competition 2020 (Germany)

Applied ICD

Call for entries, Black International Cinema Berlin, to be exhibited 7-10 May, 2020, Berlin, Germany. Deadline: 31 January 2020.

The festival focuses on presenting works of an artistic, cultural or political nature coinciding with the general educational, social, artistic and economic interest of people from Africa, the African Diaspora and people with an interest in participating in intercultural communication and the resultant interfacing and sharing of educational, social, artistic and economic resources. Black International Cinema Berlin is open to ALL filmmakers and contributes to better understanding and increasing cooperation between people from various cultural, ethnic, national and religious backgrounds, in order to reduce prejudice and support a peaceful and respectful living together in our multi-faceted societies.

The BLACK INTERNATIONAL CINEMA BERLIN is a yearly interdisciplinary, intercultural film/video festival produced and directed by Fountainhead® Tanz Théâtre / THE COLLEGIUM – Forum & Television Program Berlin / “Footprints in the Sand?” ExhibitionBerlin in association with Cultural Zephyr e.V. and screens cinema from Africa, the African Diaspora and films from varied intercultural backgrounds or perspectives.

Tree of 40 Fruit TED Talk

Applied ICDVan Aken, S. (2019, June). How one tree grows 40 different kinds of fruit [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.ted.com/talks/sam_van_aken_how_one_tree_grows_40_different_kinds_of_fruit

Sam Van Aken TED talk

 

A few months ago, CID put up a post suggesting that Sam Van Aken’s Tree of 40 Fruit provides a good metaphor for intercultural dialogue. So it seems appropriate to now point out that he gave a TED Talk this summer updating his project, for those who wish to learn more about how it has been going. And to show off his astonishing trees after a few years. of growth As he says, “This is definitely not a sport of immediate gratification.” Again, this sure sounds like a metaphor for intercultural dialogue!

Venice School of Human Rights 2020 (Italy)

Applied ICDThe Global Campus of Human Rights is now accepting applications for the Venice School of Human Rights 2020. The School will take place in Venice, at the Global Campus of Human Rights Headquarters, 28 March-4 April 2020.Application deadline: 24 February 2020, early bird until 27 January to receive a 10% discount.

The programme is divided into three separate streams covering human rights defenders, gender equality, and rights of the child. A core introduction to each of the main themes will be provided to all participants in plenary, and following this, specialised seminars will be organised in smaller groups in the respective subject areas. A red thread running through the programme will be to highlight and work with the concrete experience of participants, who bring a rich legacy of engagement in complex human rights situations to bear on the programme. The faculty of the School includes prominent academics, representatives of leading human rights NGOs, members of the European Parliament and Sakharov Prize Laureates.

Invite the World to Your Table (France)

Applied ICDInvite the world to your table/Invitez le monde à votre table CROUS, Dijon, France.

Centre régional des Œuvres Universitaires et Scolaires (CROUS) of Bourgogne-Franche-Comté in France organizes the event “Invite the world to your table.” It’s a wonderful invention: a cultural exchange lunch including international students enrolled in higher education and the inhabitants of Dijon, Besançon, Belfort, and Montbéliard. This event allows cultural exchanges around a meal between international students enrolled in higher education and inhabitants of Dijon and its surroundings.

How does it work? Inhabitants of Dijon invite one or more international students to their home for a Sunday meal. The purpose of these exchanges is for locals to discover a new culture, and for international students to learn more about French culture and gastronomy.

“Invite the world to your table” gives participants the opportunity to cross cultural boundaries. In a spirit of sharing and conviviality, the goal is to experiment with the gastronomy and the traditions of the participants but also to enrich everyone’s cultural knowledge.

1 Minute Intervention to Reduce Prejudice Through Logic

Applied ICD

Berger, Michele W. (October 7, 2019). A simple intervention enduringly reduces anti-Muslim sentiment. Penn Today.

“Research from the Annenberg School for Communication found that calling out the hypocrisy of collective blame—holding an entire group that’s not our own responsible for acts of a single person—significantly lessened hostile sentiments toward that group…Emile Bruneau, who runs the Peace and Conflict Neuroscience Lab at the University of Pennsylvania, wanted to understand why collective blame—holding an entire population responsible for the acts of a single person belonging to that group—happens and how challenging it might be to change. He and colleagues from Northwestern University and the University of Granada found that by using a simple, one-minute intervention, they could reduce anti-Muslim sentiment on the spot. What’s more, the effect held when tested again a month, and a year later.

“For the experimental group, participants went through what the researchers dubbed a “Collective Blame Hypocrisy” intervention at the initial encounter. First, participants read three descriptions of violence committed by white Europeans like Anders Breivik, a right-wing extremist who went on a shooting rampage, killing 77 people in Norway in 2011. After each example, participants rated how responsible they felt white Europeans were as a group, and how responsible they personally were, for those attacks.

“Next, they read a description of the 2015 Islamic State–led violence in Paris, accompanied by the biography of a Muslim woman named Fatima Wahid who owned a bakery there. How responsible were Fatima and others like her, participants were asked, for the violence they’d just read about? “The Spaniards who went through the simple exercise replied with a 10 on the 100-point scale,” Bruneau says. “That’s a fourfold difference from the control group.” Responses to questions about participants’ anti-Muslim sentiments (which included those assessing support for allowing Muslim refugees into Spain and for anti-Muslim policies such as closing down mosques in Spain) also improved for those who did the intervention.

“That difference in perception remained steady even a year out—the finding Bruneau says he is most excited by. “A one-minute, logical activity shook the collective blame of Muslims enough that anti-Muslim sentiments were less than the control group a full year later,” he says.

Original publication citation:
Bruneau, E., Kteily, N. S., & Urbiola, A. (2019). A collective blame hypocrisy intervention enduringly reduces hostility towards Muslims. Nature Human Behavior.

Xenophobil: Solution to Xenophobia

Applied ICDThe Exelixis Institute, an NGO working with youth in Greece, and the Embassy of Norway in Greece joined together to create and distribute a pseudo-drug, Xenophobil, as part of a creative public campaign against xenophobia and racism starting in 2013. Packages are still being distributed in 2019, most recently at the the European Day of Languages celebration held at the Norwegian Embassy in Greece.

NOTE: The video is in Greek, because this is a Greek project.

The main focus of the campaign is to defend the right to diversity and the value of peaceful coexistence. Xenophobil, a “drug” that relieves the symptoms of xenophobia and treats patients with a satirical recipe which makes everybody smile while reading the leaflet and tasting the sweet chewing gum, has been distributed by the thousands.

Excerpt from the pamphlet in the box:

“Xenophobic Symptoms”:

       * Patients consider civilizations and cultures as fixed entities that cannot be changed evaluating their own culture as the most important of the scale and underestimating the other cultures.

       *  Patients translate the term “immigrant” into the term “outsider”.

        *  Patients’ behavior toward the others depends on the predefined characteristics, due to his/hers religion, culture or mentality.

        *  Patients have the tendency  to idealize their own image.

The Academic Minute

Applied ICDSeeking Submissions for The Academic Minute: What’s New and Exciting in Academe, public radio show co-produced by AAC&U and WAMC.

Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) President Lynn Pasquerella is host of the radio segment The Academic Minute, produced by WAMC Northeast Public Radio in partnership with AAC&U. The Academic Minute features professors and researchers from colleges and universities around the world discussing what’s new in the academy and the ways in which academic research contributes to serving the public good. In addition to being broadcast widely on radio stations around the country, each segment is posted daily on Inside Higher Ed and across The Academic Minute’s and AAC&U’s social media portals.

Producers of the Academic Minute are seeking submissions about all research topics, and universities are encouraged to submit ideas for “weekly takeovers” featuring five separate research segments from one institution. Recent weekly takeovers include research from New York Institute of Technology, Roanoke College, University at Albany, Carleton College, and Amherst College. Please send your submission to David Hopper.

This would be a good opportunity to share academic research on intercultural dialogue with a large audience!

Mi’kmaq Version of Beatles ‘Blackbird’ (Canada)

Applied ICDVan Evra, Jennifer. (1 May 2019). Cape Breton student sings beautiful Mi’kmaq rendition of the Beatles’ Blackbird’. CBC Radio.

This essay and video about a translated song serve as a reminder that language and culture are bound together, and thus that intercultural dialogue has an important link to multilingualism.

“Blackbird is one of the Beatles’ most beloved songs — and now a small East Coast school has made it their own by creating a rendition in the Mi’kmaq language. Music students at Allison Bernard Memorial High School in Eskasoni, Nova Scotia created the cover as part of the International Year of Indigenous Languages, a United Nations initiative aimed at raising awareness of endangered Indigenous languages around the world. Led by music teacher Carter Chiasson, students recorded the Paul McCartney classic in their native Mi’kmaq language, with translation by Chiasson’s colleagues Katani Julian and Albert ‘Golydada’ Julian.”