Leading Intercultural Dialogues with High School Students

Applied ICDRafuls, Maylen. (26 June 2018). Cultural dialogue leads to empathy in Toulouse. CIEE Global Navigator: High School Study Abroad.

This article provides useful details about how to lead discussion of intercultural dialogue at the high school level, based on the work of Isabelle Jaffe, Director of CIEE Toulouse, with the High School Summer Abroad Program. She “facilitates cultural reflection by providing a space in which students can discuss new experiences and cultural differences and their reactions to them.” Others could learn from her experience.

Additional resources on holding intercultural dialogues: Constructing Intercultural Dialogues includes case studies on Intercultural Dialogue as an Activity of Daily Living, “America the Beautiful,” The Privilege of Listening First; and Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue includes Dialogue as a Space of Relationship.

Finding Your Way: COMPAS Photo Competition 2018

Applied ICDThe Centre on Migration, Policy, and Society (COMPAS) is a Research Centre within the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography at the University of Oxford. They hold photo competitions each year. For this year’s competition theme, Finding your Way, they are looking for photos and illustrations exploring the experiences and strategies of migrants finding their way in unfamiliar territory. Images can be anything from a symbolic illustration of the changing attitudes towards migration, to a personal depiction of moving to a new place. Winning entries will be of high quality, good composition and contain strong imagery. Enter online by 5pm, Friday 26 October 2018.

Complexity and Intractable Conflict for Journalists

Applied ICDRipley, Amanda. (27 June 2018). Complicating the narratives. Solutions Journalism.

This is a helpful concrete article by a journalist who underwent training in conflict resolution, focusing on intractable conflict, explicitly intended for journalists but useful to many others as well. The short version of the conclusion is the need to “revive complexity in a time of false simplicity.” Read the article to learn more.

Additional resources on conflict resolution and intractable conflict: Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue include short explanations of Intractable Conflict, Ethno-Political ConflictIntergroup Relations (IGR) Dialogue, Dialogic Civility, Dialogic ListeningConflict Management, Peacebuilding, Conflict Transformation, and Negotiation, among others, and all provide further readings.

Cities of Migration

Applied ICDCities of Migration showcases good ideas in immigrant integration and promotes innovative practices that create inclusion and urban prosperity. They focus on ideas that are practical, innovative, successful, and transferable. They summarize good ideas in immigration, building inclusive cities, prepare a monthly summary of Conversations in Integration,  and host a monthly webinar called Learning Exchange – the next one is titled In the Classroom and Beyond: Supporting Refugee Students. They’ve also just prepared a diagnostic tool called Test my City, to make generalizations come alive by showing how they apply to any specific city.

EIUC Electoral Observers Training 2018 (Italy)

Applied ICDInternational electoral observers training course, Global Campus of Human Rights, November 26-30, 2018, Venice, Italy. Registration deadline: October 15, 2018.

Open and legitimate elections are the indispensable foundation for sustainable development and an effective democracy. Actions supporting the right to participate in genuine elections can play a major role in sustaining peace, security and conflict prevention. Support takes the form of electoral assistance projects and election observation missions. This requires skilled and trained observers. EIUC (European Inter-University Centre for Human Rights and Democratisation) has developed a course aiming at providing training to civilian staff in election observation missions at the first steps of their career. Selected applicants will be allowed to become aware of the role, the tasks and the status of international observers, and will be given a theoretical and practical training on election observation and election observation missions functioning.

SlowFood at the Migranti Film Festival

Applied ICDSlowFood recently posted an interesting article titled Glimpses and Smells: Recipes and Short Films, based on an interview of Diana Maria Tohătan (a Romanian immigrant to Italy, who prepared food for the Migranti Film Festival, held at the University of Gastronomic Sciences campus in Pollenzo and in Bra in June 2018. Among the quotes is this: “Food is a primary need, it’s the easiest way to start an intercultural dialogue” which shows the relevance of this article for followers of this site.

Additional resources on food as a form of intercultural interaction include:

Lum, C. M. K., & de Ferrière le Vayer, M. (Eds.). (2016). Urban foodways and communication: Ethnographic studies in intangible cultural food heritages around the world. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.

Leeds-Hurwitz, W. (1993). Semiotics and communication: Signs, codes, cultures. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. (see chapter 4: Food as sign and code).

Dollar Street: Learn About the World Without Leaving Home

Applied ICDDollar Street is “where country stereotypes fall apart.” 264 homes in 50 countries have been documented with 30,000+ photos, in order to show the reality of people’s lives, leaving assumptions behind. Sounds like a good way to start intercultural dialogues, no?

As explained on their site: “Dollar Street was invented by Anna Rosling Rönnlund at Gapminder. For 15 years she spent her workdays making global public data easier to understand and use. Over time her frustration grew: carefully selecting data to present it in colorful and moving charts made overall global trends and patterns easier to understand. But it did not make everyday life on different income levels understandable. Especially not in places far from home. “People in other cultures are often portrayed as scary or exotic.” Anna explains: “This has to change. We want to show how people really live. It seemed natural to use photos as data so people can see for themselves what life looks like on different income levels. Dollar Street lets you visit many, many homes all over the world. Without travelling.”

Dollar Street is  designed to let everyone see “what life really looks like behind the income statistics” by “using photos as data.” There’s a TED Talk about it, if you want to learn more.

Take “the Other” to Lunch

Applied ICDElizabeth Lesser suggests we take “the Other” to lunch in a TED talk posted in 2010, but getting a lot of views this year (and now translated into 31 languages). She shares a simple way to begin real dialogue – by going to lunch with someone who doesn’t agree with you, and asking them three questions to find out what they think and why.

For further information about the concept of “Otherness and the Other,” there’s a Key Concept, written by Peter Praxmarer, and a CID Poster available as well.

The Urgency of Intersectionality

Applied ICDGust Yep described the concept of intersectionality in Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 49, published on this site in 2015. For those who want more information about the concept, Kimberlé Crenshaw, the lawyer who invented the term, gave a TED Talk in 2016,  The Urgency of Intersectionality. (She also coined the term “Critical race theory.”) Among other comments, she says: “When there’s no name for a problem, you can’t see a problem. When you can’t see a problem, you can’t solve it.”

A later and longer discussion of intersectionality is this:

Yep, G. A. (2016). Toward thick (er) intersectionalities: Theorizing, researching, and activating the complexities of communication and identities. In K. Sorrells & S. Sekimoto (Eds.), Globalizing intercultural communication: A reader (pp. 86-94). Sage Publications.

Cinema Human Rights and Advocacy (Italy)

Applied ICDSummer School in Cinema Human Rights and Advocacy, 27 August – 5 September 2018, Venice, Italy. Deadline: 20 June 2018.

The Summer School in Cinema Human Rights and Advocacy is a training initiative jointly developed by the European Inter-University Centre for Human Rights and Democratisation (EIUC) and Cinema Rights and Human Advocacy (CHRA).

The 10-day intense training is aimed at young professionals wishing to broaden their understanding on the connections between human rights, films, digital media and video advocacy, to share ideas and foster participatory and critical thinking on urgent human rights issues, debate with experts and filmmakers from all over the world during the 75thVenice international Film Festival and learn how to use films as a tool for social and cultural change.