Three Religions, One House (Germany)

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The House of One: Three Religions Under one Roof, Berlin, Germany.

House of One in Berlin

Berlin is soon to become home to something truly unique. Jews, Christians, and Muslims are building a house of worship together – bringing a synagogue, a church, and a mosque together under one roof. The three separate sections will be linked by a communal room in the center of the building. This will serve as a meeting place, where worshippers and members of the public can come together and learn more about the religions and each other.

The House of One on Petriplatz, the medieval birthplace of Berlin, aims to add a new and hopeful chapter to the diverse history of this city. It is being built on the foundations of Berlin’s oldest church (12th century). The architects are Kuehn Malvezzi, who provide detailed drawings of the design.

For further information, see the articles by the BBC, or Visit Berlin.

Image + Bias Competition

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Global call for submissions: IMAGE + BIAS. Deadline: Free workshop using Artivive is May 4, 2021; submissions deadline extended to May 23, 2021.

The Goethe-Institut, Gray Area, Fotomuseum Winterthur, and Artivive are launching an open call for artists, designers, and the general public to submit creative representations on the subject of bias. Submissions should articulate our ongoing concerns with technology’s growing ability to alter people’s visual perception of reality. Submissions may explore discriminatory, misrepresentational, and biased apparatuses or express thought-provoking ideas on how to deal with the perpetuation of bias by technology. Technology is never neutral but a reflection of the biases in our society. Images play an important role in that context: fake photos and videos created with deep neural networks threaten privacy, democracy, and national security. Vision recognition systems skew gender, race, and class differences and become vehicles of discrimination. Underdeveloped AI models misrepresent the health disparities faced by minority populations.

FREE workshops will guide participants through new approaches to storytelling with augmented reality using 2D and 3D animations and videos. These introductory workshops require no prior experience and will introduce artists, graphic designers, illustrators, and the general public to the app and how to use it to bring their projects to life. One remains: May 4, 2021 at 9 a.m. PST.

 

Overcoming Polarized Narratives

Applied ICDOn January 27th 2021, as part of Fielding Graduate University’s first Alumni Conference themed Global Leading and Learning in the Next Decade, Coordinated Management of Meaning Institute (CMMi) board members co-organized a panel dialogue on “Overcoming Polarized Narratives.” Four of this year’s CMMi Fellows shared their work in this theme, and four board members set the context.

In the context of global leading and learning in the next decade, we can say that overcoming polarized narratives is a key competence for leaders in the context of the relationships that they facilitate with their organizations, be they single entities, communities, networks, nations, or international cooperatives. From a communication perspective, we see the constitutive role of metaphor in overcoming polarized narrative as critical. In addition to watching the video, it is possible to also download slides.

Global Dignity Coloring Books

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How Does Your Dignity Feel? coloring book from Global Dignity, New York, NY, USA.

How Does Your Dignity Feel? is a poem/coloring book to help children understand dignity. Simply download, print and begin coloring!

How Does Your Dignity Feel?

The book is currently available in Arabic, English, French, German, Farsi, Italian, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Turkish and Ukrainian. Even more translations are on the way.

All languages are available to download, print and color for free.

Podcast: Love Premam Kaadhal

Applied ICDLove Premam Kaadhal is a podcast about intercultural love, communication, and one couple’s journey to gain a better understanding of each other’s cultures. Each week, Newlywed hosts Maddy and Shijo discuss communication and their personal experiences as an intercultural couple discovering differences and similarities between the United States and India.

Where to listen

The title is the term for love in the 3 languages this couples speaks: English, Malayalam, and Tamil. Some of the topics included in podcasts so far are high-context vs low-context cultures, individual vs. collective behavior, co-cultural theory, and post colonialism. The podcasts are the result of Maddy’s capstone project in Communication at Bushnell University in Oregon.

The Power of Food Emojis

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The power of food emojis, part of The Food Chain series, by BBC.

When the San Francisco based artist and designer Yiying Lu discovered there was no emoji to represent her beloved dumpling, she knew she had to do something about it. She tells us why for her, and millions of others, emojis are an important form of communication and cultural representation.

Do you give food emojis much thought? If not, perhaps you should. Emily Thomas hears how these tiny digital images can have a big social and economic impact. The series reveals who decides which emojis are accepted and how you can propose your very own. Two Venezuelans living in the US explain why their brand new ‘flatbread emoji’ could be one the most significant achievements of their lives, and the emoji artist responsible for everything from the ‘dumpling’ to ‘bubble tea’ tells us why she sees her work as a calling, and how it has made her an unexpected cultural ambassador.

Why I fought to get my bubble tea emoji accepted is another show in the series.

Alternative Narratives and Intercultural Communication

Applied ICDAlternative Narratives and Intercultural Communication: Building Bridges Between Intercultural Policies and Communication, An Intercultural Cities Academy, Council of Europe, 12-21 April 2021, Online.

What story does your city tell? All cities have a history; a sequence of concrete facts that are known, and that have brought us to where we are today. However, how we tell the story of our city, how we choose to frame it, the narratives we choose, will impact how that story is perceived and understood. Our story is but a puzzle of many small, diverse and intertwined pieces with different shapes and forms. The story of our city is in fact not one, but many. Do you know what stories are told and listened to? How are they told, and by whom? Is the same story told by everyone, in the same way? Herein lies the art of narrative – while we cannot change facts, we have the power to choose how we communicate about them, ensuring all stories of our city are told. We understand we can enrich our communication with multiple perspectives, fill it with many voices and value the diversity of our city. Through this, we share our history while adding more pieces to the puzzle.

When to tell that story? For intercultural inclusion to occur, city authorities shall adopt a clear and well-publicised message emphasising their commitment to intercultural principles, on all occasions, in all their communication. Every story is intercultural in a diverse city and can contribute to achieving a climate of public opinion more conducive to positive intercultural relations.

Who should that story target? All residents, regardless of their nationalities, origins, languages, religions/beliefs, sexual orientation and age group. This is not to say that every communication needs to be intended for every resident, as the most effective communications are those that target audience segments defined by particular core values and daily concerns.

Target group? Communication staff, press officers, coordinators and other relevant city representatives of cities that are members of Intercultural Cities Programme.

Musicosophia: Listening as a Necessary Part of Intercultural Dialogue

Applied ICDEscuela Internacional de Musicosophia, in Germany, trains people to listen deeply to classical music. They have suggested that their training may well be relevant to intercultural dialogue, and have shared steps and a meditation video with CID.

The 2020 CID Video Competition asked students to focus on listening, as listening is how intercultural dialogue starts. Listening is what happens when people stop focusing on what they say or do, and start attending to what someone else is saying or doing. Without listening, there can be no intercultural dialogue.

Putting these two together suggests that spending a little time learning to listen carefully to classical music might be useful training for engaging in intercultural dialogue. First, read the steps. Then, view the videotape by clicking on the image above. Try it and let us know what you think.

Intercultural Competencies Applied to Public Administration (Spain)

Applied ICDGuide on Intercultural competencies applied to the development of public administration projects, Intercultural Cities Programme, Spain.

Guide to intercultural competencies

In response to a grant from the Intercultural Cities Programme, several cities in Spain have successfully concluded a project on developing the intercultural skills of public administration staff as a key element for advancing further in the building of strong intercultural cities and territories. The assumption is that an intercultural competent staff at the service of the public administration will result in better municipal services, increase users’ satisfaction, and contribute to greater trust and sense of belonging.

The project responds to the existing gap in documentation by designing a practical handbook for city officials, transforming the concept of intercultural competence into practical language for local administration officers,  defining the basics of an intercultural competent public action, and training  local administration staff.

Duolingo Language Report 2020

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The 2020 Duolingo Language Report, issued December 15, 2020, includes trends, patterns, and analyses about language learning around the world.

The report includes 500 million learners in all 194 countries, and 39 different languages. It describes how interest in learning different languages has changed over time, especially in response to the global pandemic. It is a fascinating window on language learning across the globe and, of course, language learning is  important part of intercultural dialogue.

The major findings include: