Fulbright Award in Comm/Media Studies (Portugal)

FulbrightsFulbright Award in Communication & Media Studies, Escola Superior de Comunicação Social, Instituto Politécnico de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal. Deadline: September 16, 2019.

The School of Communication and Media Studies (Escola Superior de Comunicação SocialInstituto Politécnico de Lisboa, ESCS-IPL), known as the premier college in Communications in Portugal, seeks to cover the main strands of Communication taught in Bachelor and Master’s degrees. To this end, ESCS counts with the involvement of its nuclear Departments in Audiovisual & Multimedia; Journalism; Advertising & Marketing; Public Relations & Organizational Communication.

The Fulbright Scholar for 2020-2021 will be hosted by the Department of Audiovisual & Multimedia. The Scholar will research and debate subjects such as Digital Film Production, Business Model Journalism and Digital Strategic Communications.

Sheila McNamee Fulbright

FulbrightsSheila McNamee is Professor of Communication at the University of New Hampshire. She submitted the following discussion of her Fulbright award.

In 2012 I was a Fulbright Specialist at the University of Caldas in Manizales, Colombia. The invitation arose because, during this period, I was supervising an Assistant Professor at the University of Caldas in her PhD work.  Her PhD research was on the re-integration of former child soldiers into civilian life.  The opportunity to work with her research group, CEDAT, provided a living laboratory where the constructionist ideas I write about could be put into practice.

Sheila McNamee in Colombia
Sheila McNamee (second from left in back row) with colleagues and students in Colombia.

The project consisted of training in a social constructionist stance aimed at undergraduate and graduate faculty of the University of Caldas. Focus was on exploring how a social constructionist approach could be applied to specific areas such as social work, family development, social sciences, social research, conflict resolution and mediation. I was engaged in offering seminars, workshops and consultation with research groups. While most of my work was with faculty, some activities were extended to students and professionals from the academic community. The faculty with whom I worked were expected to begin a reflective process on teaching, research and professional practices, from a social constructionist approach and apply the knowledge acquired during the training, within the undergraduate curriculum, graduate curriculum, and social extramural programs such as “Tutor Home” and the “Center for family Intervention.” I worked with several research groups to offer advice on the specific projects being carried out at the moment as well as guidance on new projects. I worked a good deal with one research group, CEDAT. They develop processes in the area of conflict, violence and coexistence within the context of the Colombian conflict.  This is one of the strategic areas of research at the University of Caldas.

My work with CEDAT focused on conflict resolution and mediation, from a constructionist perspective. These topics are central to CEDAT’s focus on reintegration into civilian life of children and young people detached from the Colombian armed conflict. I engaged dialogical workshops with specific groups of professors with a particular focus according to the programs and needs: (1) a seminar on social construction and social work aimed to professors of the department of human development; (2) a training Workshop on constructionist research addressed to professors assigned with various research groups. These activities included Master students; (3) a training workshop on dialogue, conflict resolution and mediation; (4) a training workshop on family intervention for professors assigned to the department of family studies and the Center for family intervention staff; and (5) a seminar open to the academic community on social constructionist theory.

While these are all the “formal” activities in which I engaged, my own learning was expanded tenfold thanks to this Fulbright.  It was exciting working with research groups who were focusing on the long-standing and crippling conflict in Colombia.  This was an opportunity to take my work beyond local community and organizational conflicts and see how it could be put to use in an enduring cultural struggle.  The experience transformed my work and provided countless connections to both scholars and practitioners interested in working with dialogic ways of generating new forms of understanding.

IIE Job Ad: Director of Academic Relations – Fulbright Program (USA)

Job adsDirector of Academic Relations, Fulbright Program, The Institute of International Education (IIE), Washington, DC. Deadline: Open until filled, posted October 11, 2018.

The Institute of International Education (IIE) seeks a talented academic scholar and professional to join the Fulbright Program as the Director of Academic Relations. This individual will be responsible for overall outreach strategy for the Fulbright Scholar and Fulbright Student Programs. The Director of Academic Relations will represent the Fulbright Program externally, engage with higher education leaders in the United States, and supervise Fulbright outreach and recruitment activities that will impact and benefit both U.S. and non-U.S. Fulbright Programs. The Director of Academic Relations will have a special focus on extending the Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program’s reach by fostering increased collaborations with higher education institutions and academic and professional associations and enhancing its identity and levering IIE-wide support for the Scholar Program.

Fulbright-Hays Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowships

The U.S. Department of Education (ED) is seeking applications for a new competition: Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowship Program. The program provides opportunities to doctoral candidates to engage in full-time doctoral research abroad in modern foreign languages and area studies. Only applications that propose research on the following geographic areas will be accepted: Africa, East Asia, Southeast Asia and the Pacific Islands, South Asia, the Near East, Central and Eastern Europe and Eurasia, and the Western Hemisphere (excluding the U.S.). Applications are due April 28, 2015.

Fulbright update-Adelman

Nov. 16th,  Mekelle University—Northern Ethiopia

Am nearing the end of my 42 day Fulbright appointment.  So many poignant moments to share.  15 students came to my home last night to make braided bracklets, compliments of my friend NIKKI, from BEADWORLD—60% men, 40% women; their focus, determination, energy was mindblowing, within an hour they made the bracklets and were so happy…now they must teach their classmates.  An older student said to me, “A teacher has never done this for us…”

Tomorrow is an ALL-DAY workshop for all 75 students in Public Speaking and Nonverbal Comm…am throwing a Public Speaking CONTEST next Weds. evening w/ PRIZES!

I’m giving a FINAL PARTY for all three classes, 75 students; the President of Mekelle U. is coming (with his wife), and about 10 faculty and friends…at a delicious, outdoor Pizza Restaurent, with pizza, drinks & dancing!

I got such a nice compliment from the guy who brought me to Ethiopia—he said, “I notice you teach the WHOLE 2 hours, most faculty are 1—1.5 hours; and you do all these extra lectures/workshops….we all agree you were the right Fulbrighter to bring here” – I was very touched.  It’s been fun, takes a lot of initiative to do anything here; easy to just slide by.  Last week, I gave a talk to faculty on SOLITUDE, expected about 4 to come; but 12 faculty came, including the DEAN (who is a poet and misses his solitude!)…we had such a great, lively discussion!  Not sure I could do a full year here—but I leave w/ so many great memories!

There are little reminders of life’s struggle here…although never verbalized.  When I grab the students’ arms to walk up stairs, I am always struck with how thin and fragile they are—even those that look “full body” are what we would call “skin & bones.”  A perpetual reminder of the minimal food, low protein here or in their past diet.  You do not see starvation, but people are so thin here.

One never knows the “real” background of their students.  I took this student, who I think is exceptional, out for coffee—to hear about her life plans.  She comes to class dressed so immaculately, so sparkling clean, her writing is great, she is outspoken, so quick and lively (unlike the sullen, taciturn females here).  I presumed she was from a middle-income, intact family.  Her mother died when she was about 8, only child, her father is a laborer.  She said, “I am very neat because it gives me confidence.  I don’t have any money, but I can be neat.”  She is studying Japanese/Chinese, and trying to learn as much as possible—she wants to enter politics and study political science…I find her inspiring.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Addis wants me to do a couple workshops in Public Speaking and also Nonverbal Communication—the US Embassy is working on dates and logistics…MFA heard about my “success” with govt. officials and PR people—now the “big wigs” want the workshop…I am totally jazzed to do this.

I will be very sad to leave…it really has been an amazing journey, of all kinds….

Mara Adelman, Ph.D.
Seattle University
Associate Professor
Department of Communication

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Cross-cultural/intercultural powerpoints wanted

Request for Basic Cross-cultural/Intercultural Powerpoints

“I am Mara Adelman (Seattle University, author of BEYOND LANGUAGE: Cross-cultural Communication for ESL), and I am heading to Mekelle University in Ethiopia on a Fulbright assignment, for a 42 days series of lectures, seminars, workshops on various topics in communication. Am seeking powerpoints on basic presentations for cross-cultural communication (e.g. theory, values, rituals, non-verbal, verbal, cross-cultural adaptation, work place, friendships, etc.). I would be willing to exchange for powerpoints on such topics as distraction, solitude, contemplative practices, world travel.  Please know that your powerpoints would only be used during this assignment, no copies, forwarded emails, etc. would occur.  Please send to/any questions, etc.: mara@seattleu.edu
MANY THANKS FOR YOUR SUPPORT.”

–Mara Adelman, Seattle University

James Schnell – Fulbright

James Schnell
Ohio Dominican University

Fulbright Senior Scholar, Cambodia

The Fulbright Senior Scholar Program provided me with a wonderful opportunity to invigorate my work at my home institution by applying my expertise at another school in another culture.  I had never been to Cambodia before and working at the Royal University of Phnom Penh, the largest and oldest university in Cambodia, was personally and professionally rewarding.

I received a six-week grant that I divided into two separate three week visits.  The first trip gave me a chance to get acquainted with the Department of Media and Communication/Cambodia Communication Institute at the university, work with students & faculty and assess how I could best make lasting contributions.  I followed this with a second trip, ten months later, and used the intervening ten months to collect materials that helped with enhancements on my second trip.

The purpose of the grant was to support the Department of Media and Communication/Cambodia Communication Institute in developing an appropriate educational program for the education and training of future Cambodian journalists.  This, more specifically, entailed focusing on development and improvement of curriculum for the undergraduate program and developing teaching materials in communication theory, human resource management, introduction to research methodology and related areas.

My work at the university involved presenting lectures, participating in seminars, conducting needs assessments, assisting with faculty development, encouraging curriculum development and other matters linked to my areas of expertise.  I created an 11 page Manual for Organization of Research Papers, Rules for Writing Style & Preparation of Oral Presentations.” I also created a small reference library consisting of over 60 new (state of the art) books that I brought as a donation to their program.  This collection consisting of books dealing with telecommunication, journalism, mass media, public relations, communication research, human resource management and related areas.

Part of the challenge of this assignment was finding creative ways to achieve objective.  The mail system in Cambodia was unreliable so I needed to personally bring the books with me.  On my second trip I was permitted 120 pounds of luggage and 105 pounds of it were books!  Getting the books to them was important as I saw this collection as being a foundation that they could build from in a variety of ways using their own initiative.

This Fulbright grant gave me a great opportunity to re-think much of what I do and how I do it at my home institution.  Working with colleagues and students in my discipline, but within another cultural context (especially one that is quickly changing), forced me to revisit many of the assumptions I have regarding my academic discipline and how I work within that discipline.  It is an invigorating experience that will have a lasting impact on my teaching and research at my home institution.  Being able to make new friends and establish collegial relationships in another culture is always fulfilling, professionally and personally.

I continue to maintain contact with Sopheap Phan, my primary host during my work in Cambodia.  We have gotten together on two occasions and we engage in periodic e-mail exchanges.  I foresee doing follow-up trips to Cambodia that will build upon my experiences there in 2005-2006.

Susan Opt – Fulbright

Susan Opt
James Madison University

Fulbright to Czech Republic

In fall 2009, I was a Fulbright scholar at Masaryk University in Brno, Czech Republic. I taught two graduate courses—Intercultural Communication and the Rhetoric of Social Intervention—and one undergraduate course in The History and Culture of US Media.

Unlike many Fulbrighters, I did not have any contacts in the Czech Republic or a letter of invitation. Instead, I spent time researching the “open” or “general” calls on the Fulbright web site and emailing some of the program officers to get information about opportunities in their region (although I did not email the program officer responsible for the Czech Republic!). In the end, I decided to apply to the Czech Republic for several reasons. First, the US institution where I was teaching at the time had been founded by immigrants from Moravia, a part of the Czech Republic. In my application, I connected my interest this historical piece with cultural insights that I might gain from working in the Czech Republic. Second, I had lived and worked in Germany and had visited the Czech Republic in its pre-revolution and immediate-post-revolutions days, so I had some familiarity with the culture. I thought my proficiency in German might come in handy in interactions with older Czechs. I also wanted to see how the culture had changed in the two decades after the revolution. Finally, I felt that the Czech Republic might be a less popular choice by other applicants and so that might increase my chances of getting an award!

After I decided to focus on the Czech Republic I spent time online researching institutions in the Czech Republic to see which ones might offer programs in my areas of interest. I applied for a teaching award because in the Czech Republic, at least, teaching awards are more numerous than research awards. I also looked for programs that offered instruction in English. In my application, I proposed classes and suggested institutions where my knowledge might be useful. In my statement, I focused on the benefits I could offer the host institution. I also emphasized what I could learn from this experience that would benefit my institution and students.

The application review involved several steps. First, the US Fulbright Commission reviewed the application and determined whether it would be forwarded to the Czech Republic. Then the Czech Fulbright Commission reviewed the application to determine whether it should be forwarded to an institution. In an “open” call, like my case, the Czech Fulbright program officers contacted Czech institutions to see if they would be willing to sponsor a Fulbrighter. After they approved the application, then it came back to the United States for final review.

If a Fulbright is granted, then there’s more work! Applicants have to pass a medical exam and, depending upon the country’s requirements, may have to go through a security check with the country’s police, get a visa, and get shots. In addition, “open” call applicants, like me, may have to spend time corresponding with the host institution to negotiate courses or research needs. At this point, one of the most helpful pieces of information acquired from either the in-country Fulbright program coordinator or from the US program officer for that country is copies of previous Fulbrighters’ final reports. Fulbrighters write a final report that summarizes their experiences and give advice for future Fulbrighters. In my case, the reports were extremely helpful in knowing what to expect in the Czech classroom and working ahead of time with the Czech institution to put enrollment limits on the courses. The reports as well as communication with the institution helped me know what technology was available and what kinds of materials I would need to bring with me. For example, Czech students cannot afford to buy textbooks. Fortunately, the Fulbright Commission provides teaching scholars a small stipend for books, so I was able to bring copies of used books for students.

Finally, the key to applying for and surviving a Fulbright is flexibility. You need to be flexible in terms of where you might be willing to go. And you need to be flexible and adaptable to the conditions that you find when you arrive. For example, you might end up teaching a course different than you had expected and prepared for. You might find that the students have different language abilities, backgrounds, and preparations than you imagined. You might find that how courses are taught and the length of courses differ from what you are used to. But these kinds of surprises teach us a lot about ourselves, our culture, and our educational system and help achieve William Fulbright’s vision of changing the world by changing how we think.

Richard Buttny – Fulbright

Richard Buttny
Syracuse University

Fulbright to Malaysia/Fulbright Senior Specialist to India

Having a Fulbright Fellowship has been a great experience, meeting and working along with colleagues at their universities.  I had a Fulbright to Malaysia at Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) in Shah Alam for six months in 2008-09.  I ended up giving lectures to faculty on qualitative research methods and taught one graduate class on media and culture.  I was able to work with colleagues on on-going research projects and have been back to the region a couple more times.

My first Fulbright was made possible by a former graduate student who had become Chair of his Department and wrote a letter on my behalf.  This was a Fulbright Senior Specialist to lecture on intercultural communication at Punjabi University, India, 2003.  The Senior Specialist awards are only up to six weeks.  I wish I would have had a longer stay there.

Kristen Cvancara – Fulbright

Kristen Cvancara
Minnesota State University, Mankato

Fulbright Teaching/Research Scholar Grant in Finland

When planning ahead for my sabbatical, I realized that a Fulbright award was an excellent opportunity for me to achieve the goals of growing professionally and living abroad with my husband and our three children. I applied for a grant in Finland because I wanted to work with a colleague with whom I had been collaborating since 2002. I drafted a plan for a project that would blend our research interests and reviewed it with my Finnish colleague at the 2009 NCA conference in Chicago. With encouragement and support from her and her department (including a letter of invitation), I submitted my Fulbright application in the summer of 2010. In March of 2011, I was notified by letter of the acceptance of that application. My two goals were finally realized in January of 2012 as my family boarded a plane headed for Jyväskylä, Finland, where we would live for the coming 5 months.

While in Finland, I taught two courses and conducted research in the Department of Communication at the University of Jyväskylä. The teaching connected me with students from all over Europe, exposed me to different worldviews, and prompted me to adapt my teaching style in new and unique ways. The research project blossomed into a study involving five countries on four different continents. It was amazing to watch this kind of collaboration develop through conversations, emails, Skype calls, and joint meetings. I had the opportunity to build relationships with Finnish and European colleagues, fellow Fulbrighters, and members of the community where we lived for 5 months.  All of these experiences changed me, and my family as well. The challenges and obstacles we faced together forced us to re-evaluate beliefs that we took for granted, revise ineffective strategies, and review our motivations for living outside of our comfort zone. Even when reflecting on the most difficult days, I marvel at the amazing, wonderful experience the Fulbright grant provided us.

A Fulbright experience is worthy of the preparation devoted to crafting a solid application. Check out the following websites for more information on Fulbright grants, the Fulbright Center in Finland, and the Fulbright scholar list to view others from the discipline who have earned grants. I especially encourage individuals with children to apply. In keeping with Senator Fulbright’s initial goals, living abroad with children is a prime opportunity to strengthen their empathy for others and foster a worldview that integrates compassion and understanding.