Intercultural Learning Hub

Intercultural PedagogyIntercultural Learning Hub, public “science gateway” sponsored by Purdue University’s Center for Intercultural Learning, Mentorship, Assessment and Research.

Calling all interculturalists! Looking for resources to help others develop intercultural competence or engage them in equity and inclusion work? Need a venue to disseminate your latest scholarship? Searching for connection with others in the field? Visit the new Intercultural Learning Hub. Membership is free. Your contributions are welcome.

Ramen Shop

Intercultural Pedagogy
Ramen Shop could not be more appropriate as a tool for starting discussions about intercultural dialogue.

The protagonist, the son of a Singaporean mother and Japanese father,  searches for family history and recipes simultaneously. By the end, he combines his father’s ramen noodles with his mother’s bak kut teh, or pork rib soup.

Indigenization of Post-Secondary Institutions (Canada)

Intercultural PedagogyWilson, Kory. (2018).Pulling together: A guide for Indigenization of post-secondary institutions. BCcampus’ Indigenization Professional Learning Series.

“The Foundations Guide is part of an open professional learning series developed for staff across post-secondary institutions in British Columbia. Guides in the series include: Foundations;[1] Leaders and Administrators;[2] Curriculum Developers;[3] Teachers and Instructors;[4] Front-line Staff, Student Services, and Advisors;[5] and Researchers.[6]. These guides are the result of the Indigenization Project, a collaboration between BCcampus and the Ministry of Advanced Education, Skills and Training. The project was supported by a steering committee of Indigenous education leaders from BC universities, colleges, and institutes, the First Nations Education Steering Committee, the Indigenous Adult and Higher Learning Association, and Métis Nation BC.

These guides are intended to support the systemic change occurring across post-secondary institutions through Indigenization, decolonization, and reconciliation. A guiding principle from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada process states why this change is happening.

Reconciliation requires constructive action on addressing the ongoing legacies of colonialism that have had destructive impacts on Aboriginal peoples’ education, cultures and languages, health, child welfare, the administration of justice, and economic opportunities and prosperity. (2015, p. 3)

(From the Overview)

This series is one result of the BCcampus’ Indigenization Project.

Videos from TV2: All that we Share (Denmark)

Intercultural PedagogyTV2 Denmark created  the Alt Det Vi Deler (All that we share) video 2 years ago, showing multiple ways to group individuals to either emphasize their differences, or their commonalities.

This year they’ve done it again, posting All that we share: Connected. Again, this is a fantastic way to demonstrate shared history, even (especially) when what we share is invisible.

Either would make a wonderful prompt for class discussions of cultural differences and/or assumptions about identity and/or group membership. Students could be asked to create a version for their own communities. Here’s a video adapting the original ad from Nigeria, and others from France, Canada, and the UK.

Food and Cultural Identity as a Pedagogical Tool

Intercultural PedagogyPrint advertisements created by TBWA, Australia, in 2009 for the Sydney International Food Festival, show flags for different countries made out of their traditional foods.

Sydney International Food Festival

So far the campaign has received a lot of attention from design and advertising sites, as in this analysis by Ads of the World, which includes images of the flags and details as to the designers, or from food websites, as with Kitchn, which focuses on the foods chosen. @Sietar_UK  tweeted about it in 2019; clearly they are correct that the campaign should get attention from those interested in intercultural matters, even a decade late. In particular, these flags made of foods should be a good way to get students actively involved in thinking about cultural differences while doing something creative, such as asking them to create flags for additional countries (especially ones to which students have connections), or to research the particular foods chosen and how they are traditionally prepared, and/or what other countries have already adopted them.

Gabriele Galimberti’s Toy Stories

Intercultural PedagogyGabriele Galimberti, the Italian photographer, has created an interesting comparative record in Toy Stories. “For over two years, I visited more than 50 countries and created colorful images of boys and girls in their homes and neighborhoods with their most prized possessions: their toys. From Texas to India, Malawi to China, Iceland, Morocco, and Fiji, I recorded the spontaneous and natural joy that unites kids despite their diverse backgrounds. Whether the child owns a veritable fleet of miniature cars or a single stuffed monkey, the pride that they have is moving, funny, and thought provoking.”

The photographs are available as a book, Toy Stories: Photos of Children from Around the World and Their Favorite Things. Prior collections also now published as books include In Her Kitchen: Stories and Recipes from Grandmas Around the World, and My Couch Is Your Couch: Tour the World from Inside Other People’s Homes. Each of these seems likely to be useful to anyone seeking examples of comparative cultural analysis.

Additional resources include several of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, specifically: Cultural PluralismMulticulturalismMultimodality, and Cultural Mapping.

Sagara and Interracial Communication

Intercultural PedagogyMichelle Sagara (AKA Michelle West, and Michelle Sagara West) is a Japanese-Canadian author based in Toronto, Canada. She has published the Chronicles of Elantra, a science fiction series (13 books and a novella so far) featuring interactions among 5 races of beings, some mortal and some not. For anyone looking to introduce fiction into a course on intercultural communication, they would make a good possibility.

For those interested in more academic discussions of the ways in which fiction generally, science fiction specifically, or films, can contribute to intercultural and/or interracial understanding, here are some beginning points:

Condon, J. (1986). Exploring intercultural communication through literature and film. World Englishes, 5(2-3), 153-161.

Hoff, H.E. (2013). ‘Self’ and ‘Other’ in meaningful interaction: Using fiction to develop intercultural competence in the English classroom. Tidsskriftet FoU i praksis, 7(2), 27–50.

Kawai, Y. (2008). Implicating knowledge with practice: Intercultural communication education with the novel. In C. C. Irvine (Ed.), Teaching the novel across the curriculum: A handbook for educators (pp. 73-83). Westport, CN: Greenwood.

Kramsch, C. & Kramsch, O. (2000). The avatars of literature in language study. The Modern Language Journal, 84(4), 553–573.

Lewis, T. J., & Jungman, R. E. (Eds.). (1986). On being foreign: Culture shock in short fiction. Yarmouth, ME: Intercultural Press.

Pratiwi, W. R. (2017). Exploring intercultural values from the perspective of Western-Asian way of life: A study of Lilting film. Journal of English Education2(2), 113-123.

Wilkinson, L. C. (2007). A developmental approach to uses of moving pictures in intercultural education. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 31(1), 1-27.

 

Reading the World Project

Intercultural PedagogyAnn Morgan, a UK editor and author, realized most of the books she read were by UK and North American authors, so deliberately set out to locate and read books from every country in the world, as described in her TED talk in 2015. This sounds like a great project for intercultural communication students.

If anyone wants to follow her example, for themselves or for students, here’s her list. She has created a website and published a book about her year, titled Reading the World: Confessions of a Literary Explorer in the UK, and The World Between Two Covers: Reading the Globe in the US and Canada.

Mind Over Media European Network

Intercultural PedagogyOf possible interest to followers of CID:

This website showcases the work of the Mind Over Media European Network, which is supported by the Evens Foundation and the European Commission’s Literacy for All initiative. They provide a space for educators to share strategies and approaches for addressing teaching and learning about contemporary propaganda. The Media Education Lab maintains this website in conjunction with the crowdsourced online gallery of propaganda, Mind Over Media: Analyzing Contemporary Propaganda.  

The Art of Being Human

Intercultural PedagogyDr. Michael Wesch, who teaches Anthropology at Kansas State University, is opening up his online course, ANTH 101, to everyone, as an experiment in pedagogy. Having distilled the basic insights of anthropologists into 10 lessons (starting with People are different), he’s developed 10 challenges, including Other Encounters). He has also drafted a new book as companion to the course, The Art of Being Human, which is being shared in digital format through the course site.

Given that his research focus is on the effects of social media and digital technology on global society, it probably makes sense that he is currently exploring how best to use an online course to share information even beyond his own university. The class begins June 5, 2017.

Wesch has posted a description of the course, and the ways in which others may choose to use some of his content, in a post to Savage Minds.

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