Quote of the Day: Communication as a Miracle of Translation

Occasionally when I read, a quote related to intercultural dialogue strikes me as particularly noteworthy for being insightful, concise, beautifully written, and/or original. One example is provided below. Given the translations I have been publishing, not to mention the state of the world these days, it seems particularly apropos.

“Every act of communication is a miracle of translation.” (p. vii)

• Liu, K. (2016). The paper menagerie and other stories. London: Saga Press.

If you have quotes you would like to see posted, submit them for consideration to intercult.dialogue@[at]gmail.com

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

Kids and Culture Camp

Fostering Cultural Diversity at CampEagan, O. (28 February 2017). Fostering cultural curiosity at camp. The Hill.

“there’s nothing like real knowledge of an individual
to destroy a stereotype”

Owen Eagan, who as writing a story for The Hill, a Washington, DC newspaper, contacted me a few weeks ago, to ask about intercultural dialogue. While I have no specific knowledge of or experience with the camp he was writing about, I did agree to make a few generalizations about intercultural dialogue, a few of which are quoted in the attached article.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

Save

Save

Save

Save

Key Concept #10: Cross-Cultural Dialogue Translated into Spanish

Continuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#10: Cross-Cultural Dialogue, which I wrote and first published in English in 2014, which Shirley Saenz has now translated into Spanish. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available.

Leeds-Hurwitz, W. (2017). Diálogo cross-cultural. (S. Saenz, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 10. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/02/kc10-cross-cultural-dialogue_spanish.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

Save

New CID Series: Constructing Intercultural Dialogues

Recent events suggest that the world needs more people to listen to one another and to think about what they share rather than quite so many people ignoring one another, or making false assumptions about others. We must spend more effort promoting social cohesion (that is, emphasizing similarities across group boundaries) rather than leaving uncontested the frequent assumption that all cultural others have different agendas and share few of our values.

Intercultural dialogues are often assumed to require substantial effort in terms of organization, and to involve a lot of people having multiple interactions over a long period of time. This is certainly one model. However, many people have at least brief intercultural dialogues frequently, and easily. The goal of this new publication series is to invite a wide range of people to tell the story of a time when intercultural dialogue occurred, whether it was of the short and easy variety or the long and structured variety, providing models for those who do not frequently participate in intercultural dialogues.

In either model, intercultural dialogue is jointly constructed by participants, requiring cooperation to engage in new and different ways of interacting. It is more important to start from a position of curiosity and a willingness to listen than it is to undergo formal training (although at least some instruction or guidance is always useful).

Many of the people affiliated with the Center for Intercultural Dialogue consider themselves to be interculturalists. Many have lived and/or worked in multiple countries, speak multiple languages, and/or study intercultural interactions generally, if not intercultural dialogues specifically. The goal of this new series is to harvest the knowledge gained by this group and share it publicly.

To ensure consistency, all authors are asked to follow the same outline:
Context – How did this episode come about? Who was involved, in what circumstances and location? What started the dialogue? Where did it happen?
Participants – Since people have multiple identities, what are the cultural backgrounds that proved relevant? Provide some detail about the participants; for example, what language(s) were they speaking? What was your role in this episode? (observer, facilitator, translator, participant?)
Description – How did the events unfold? Thinking now about what happened, what were the key parts of the process? Any interventions? Any sticking points?
Dialogic features – What made it dialogue? That is, how was it different from ordinary conversation, what stood out as noteworthy that might be replicated in future?
Lessons learned – What make it work as dialogue? What things could have been done better? What lessons would you pass on to others?

If you are interested in writing up a case study for this series and have previously published with the Center for Intercultural Dialogue, just write it up and send it in. If you have never published with CID, it might be best to first send a note introducing yourself, and briefly explaining what it is you would like to write about, receiving approval before you take the time to write.

As with Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, this new series will not be subject to blind peer review, but rather will be accepted at the discretion of the Director. The logic is that these are not major research publications, but rather small notes intended for quick publication. No one is likely to earn tenure on the strength of such publications as these, but they have a different goal, that of sharing information rapidly and widely.

A few technical notes:
• These case studies should be based on personal experience.
• These should be written clearly using a minimum of jargon or technical terms, so that anyone can understand them, without quotes, footnotes, or references. Instead, the focus is on describing your own experience.
• Case studies should be 1-2 pages long, and will be edited and formatted to a common template prior to publication.
• Please use the section headings indicated in the outline above.
• On confidentiality: there’s no need to provide other people’s real names if that’s not essential to the story you’re telling.
• On copyright: authors retain copyright of their own work, and may publish in another format in future.
• If you have other questions, just ask.

These case studies will be published in English. However, given that translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue have received so many views, anyone who wishes to translate their own narrative into another language (or two) is invited to provide that as well, or to send a note explaining that it will follow. If you want to volunteer to translate others’ case studies into a language in which you are fluent, send in a note before starting, just to confirm no one else is working on the same one.

Thank you for taking the time to share your experience and knowledge.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com

NOTE: The series has now started, and is to be found under Publications in the top menu; a direct link is here.

Change to CID Website Format

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue is changing the basic website template as of today. The goal is to adopt a responsive theme so that the increasing number of followers who access the site on mobile devices will be able to locate content and move around the menu. Hopefully it will be an easy transition for all. Advance apologies for any glitches that occur during the transition; they will be repaired as quickly as possible.

One note: to access the category cloud that used to show on the bottom left of the home page, you now need to click on any post and it will show at the bottom of the page again.

You are welcome to send comments about this, as about all other matters.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com

Key Concept #5: Intercultural Communication Translated into Spanish

Continuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting  KC#5: Intercultural communication, first published in English in 2014, which Shirley Saenz has now translated into Spanish. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available.

KC5 Intercultural Communication_SpanishLeeds-Hurwitz, W. (2016). Comunicación intercultural. (S. Saenz, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 5. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2016/11/kc5-intercultural-communication_spanish.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

Save

National Communication Association 2016

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

I participated in the National Communication Association convention in Philadelphia, November 10-13, 2016. I was a panelist for ‘Catching Ourselves in the Act’ Revisited: Taking Stock of the Past(s) and Future(s) of Communication Social Construction. The panel chair was Patricia Covarrubias; other panelists were Brenda Allen, Kevin Barge, Theresa Castor, Gloria Galanes, and Liliana Castañeda de Rossmann – pictured in the slideshow on my right. We discussed what has happened in the 10 years since the ‘Catching Ourselves in the Act’ conference on social construction theory, held in Albuquerque, NM. That event used an uncommon design, and was one of the influences on the format of the NCA Summer Conference on Intercultural Dialogue in Istanbul in 2009, the event which led to the creation of this Center for Intercultural Dialogue.

This conference was replete with such echoes of past events. I saw several of those who were at that Istanbul conference (including Erla S. Kristjánsdóttir – in the slideshow on my left, Jolanta Drzwiecka, and Eddah Mutua), or at the Macau Roundtable on Intercultural Dialogue in Asia (Todd Sandel, Sunny Lie, and Richard Buttny). Villanova University held a social event for past, present, and future Harron Chairs, and as their 2013 chair, I was invited, and got to see many of my colleagues from that campus (including Maurice Hall, Sherry Bowen, Heidi Rose, and Bryan Crable) as well as Marianela Nunez, who has managed to turn her MA thesis into a full-time job! I also caught up with several of CID’s advisory board members (Donal Carbaugh and Todd Sandel again), and saw many scholars who have researcher profiles on this site (John Baldwin, Yea-Wen Chen, Sara DeTurk, Gonen Dori-Hacohen, Tenzin Dorjee, Don Ellis, Beth Haslett, Ron Jackson, Trudy Milburn, Bob Shuter, Miriam Sobre-Denton, and Yael Warshel among them). One of the results of my conversations is that additional scholars have agreed to write new Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, or translate those already published in English, and these will start appearing over the next few months. Another result came out of discussion at the International and Intercultural Communication Division business meeting, and will result in a new series for CID – details to be announced shortly.

On the way from Vermont to Philadelphia, I stopped in New York to connect with Casey Man Kong Lum, and was given a guided tour of Chinatown, with a focus on food (he just co-edited Urban foodways and communication: Ethnographic studies in intangible cultural food heritages around the world, a book for which I wrote a chapter). In addition, he recently worked with the Museum of Food and Drink (MOFAD) on a project called MOFAD City, contributing to a filmed tour of Manhattan’s Chinatown (clip shown above). While in New York, I finally saw Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava’s Oculus, the new transit hub at the World Trade Center, so a photo of that is provided in the slide show as well (a world tour planned around visits to Calatrava buildings would be a joy, given their beauty – I’ve already seen his work in Lyon, Lisbon, Dublin, Liège, Buenos Aires, Tenerife, and of course, my former home of Milwaukee). Given the emphasis on food as a form of communication in New York, it was easy to maintain that focus to find excellent multicultural restaurants in Philadelphia, and I enjoyed Afghani, Cuban, Indian, Japanese-French fusion, and Thai meals during my stay.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

 

Key Concept #5: Intercultural Communication Translated into Persian

Continuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting  KC#5: Intercultural Communication, first published in English in 2014, which Ramin Hajian Fard has now translated into Persian. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available.

KC5: ICC__PersianLeeds-Hurwitz, W. (2016). Intercultural communication [Persian]. (R. H. Fard, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 5. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2016/11/kc5-icc_persian.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue[at]gmail.com

Key Concept #10: Cross-Cultural Dialogue Translated into Persian

Continuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting  KC#10: Cross-cultural dialogue, which I published in English in 2014 as the first in the series, and which Ramin Hajian Fard has now translated into Persian. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download.

KC10 Cross-Cultural Dialogue_PersianLeeds-Hurwitz, W. (2016). Cross-cultural dialogue [Persian]. (R. H. Fard, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 10. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.org/publications/

To see which other concepts have been translated into which languages, see the main publications page. The goal of the project is to expand the concepts available to discussions of intercultural dialogue beyond those who are fluent in English. If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue[at]gmail.com

Royal Roads University & Cultural Identity 2016

I spent July, August and September 2016 teaching a graduate seminar at Royal Roads University, located in Victoria, BC, Canada, as part of their Master of Arts in International and Intercultural Communication (MAIIC) for the second time (the first time was described a year ago). The course was Contemporary Issues in Communication: Cultural Identity. The 39 students came from China, Nigeria, India, France, Senegal/France, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, Jordan, Brazil, the US, and Canada.

Near the end of the course, there was a banquet for students in the program, and many photos were taken, including one with those faculty, staff and administrators who were present. We took another the last day of class. None of these includes everyone.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Students worked on a major course project on the social construction of migration in the public sphere. Each one looked at a different part of the story – I hope to upload some of their results in later posts.

While at RRU, I arranged for an intern for CID, Min He. She started her work as Assistant to the Director on October 3, 2016.

I also was asked to supervise a doctoral dissertation in Interdisciplinary Studies, and have started working with Liton Furukawa on her project. An international student herself, she will examine the transition international students make after graduation (when Canada offers them a 3 year residency permit) to being international workers.

My thanks to Juana Du, program head of the MAIIC, for again inviting me to her beautiful campus to work with an incredible group of students!

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue[at]gmail.com