The Value of a Fulbright

FulbrightsLeeds-Hurwitz, W. (2020). The value of a Fulbright: Internationalizing education one person at a time. In P. K. Turner, S. Bardhan, T. Q. Holden & E. M. Mutua (Eds.), Internationalizing the communication curriculum in an age of globalization (pp. 196-206). New York: Routledge.

Fulbrights have the greatest impact on the person most directly involved, who is given the opportunity to move between countries. But that person has students. And that person has colleagues. So, as it turns out, changing one person at a time works well as a way to internationalize the curriculum.

Over a year ago I requested that scholars who had held Fulbright awards write to me about their experiences. This chapter would not have been possible if so many had not taken the time to send me their stories. Hopefully I have summed up what we all learned in ways that these colleagues will approve, and others will find useful. The short version of the chapter’s advice: if you have not yet applied for a Fulbright, do so! (There are Fulbrights for those based in the USA who wish to live abroad, and for those living elsewhere who wish to spend time in the USA.)

Here is how the book’s editors summarize the entire volume:

“Globalization and the resulting internationalization of universities is driving change in teaching, learning and what it means to be educated. This book provides exemplars of how the communication discipline and curriculum are responding to the demands of globalization and contributing to the internationalization of higher education.

Communication as a discipline provides a strong theoretical and methodological framework for exploring the benefits, challenges and meanings of globalization. The goal of this book, therefore, is to facilitate internationalization of the communication discipline in an era of globalization. Section one discusses the theoretical perspectives of globalism, internationalization, and the current state of the communication discipline and curriculum. Section two offers a comprehensive understanding of the role, ways and impact of internationalizing teaching, learning and research in diverse areas of study in communication, including travel programs and initiatives to bring internationalization to the classroom. The pieces in this section will include research-based articles, case studies, analytical reviews that examine key questions about the field and themed pieces for dialogue/debate on current and future teaching and learning issues related to internationalizing the communication discipline/curriculum. Section three provides an extensive sampling of materials and resources for immediate use in internationalization in communication studies: sample syllabi, activities, examples and readings will be included. In sum, our book is designed to enable communication curriculum and communication courses in other disciplines to be internationalized and to offer different approaches to enable faculty, students and administrators to incorporate and experience an internationalized curriculum regardless of time and financial limitations.”

Understanding Knowledge as a Global Commons

Director's ActivitiesLeeds-Hurwitz, W. (2019). Commentary: Moving (slowly) toward understanding knowledge as a global commons. Journal of Multicultural Discourses, 15. DOI: 10.1080/17447143.2019.1695806

My commentary article was invited as a response to “Power relations in global knowledge production: A cultural/critical approach” by Marton Demeter. Both articles are already available online, and will be in print within a few months. To give you the flavor of the article, let me quote the first and last paragraphs. If you then wish to read the entire commentary, 50 copies may be downloaded free using this link. If you are the 51st person or beyond and those copies are gone, you may send an email requesting a personal copy.

“Marton Demeter responds to the move to de-westernization . . . by asking whether the reality of practice in cultural discourse studies fits with the stated goal of acknowledging globalization by expanding what is accepted within academia (so that the US and Western Europe do not assume they will produce the research that scholars in other countries read, but instead that everyone will produce interesting work that everyone else will read). He examines journal publications, a central tool in the social construction of knowledge, looking in greatest detail at ‘diversities in editorial boards, diversities in science output and the network of collaboration’. He finds that editorial board diversity correlates with the home country of the authors (so that journals with mostly US/Western scholars on the editorial boards publish few articles by authors from other parts of the world, despite explicit statements taking this as a goal).”

. . .

“In sum, I do not argue with Demeter’s findings, and in fact wish he had been a bit more radical in his call for change. In addition to internationalizing editorial boards, authors, and research teams, I have suggested that we need to recognize and reward intercultural capital, expand international networks at all levels (including editors and peer reviewers specifically for journal publishing, but more broadly expanding international research collaborations), and consider how to use the available technology to ensure that knowledge will be free and accessible to all, calling on senior faculty and major universities to make the first move. I would summarize this set of options as moving towards a global knowledge commons, a phrase others have used, but which has not yet been widely adopted.”

Thick Description as a Tool for ICD

Resources in ICD“ width=Leeds-Hurwitz, W. (2019). Thick description. In P. Atkinson, S. Delamont, M.A. Hardy, & M. Williams (Eds.), SAGE research methods foundations [Online]. doi: 10.4135/9781526421036765746

Several years ago I was asked to write about “thick description,” a concept used mostly by ethnographers. Briefly, thick description recognizes complexity and the role of context. It is often contrasted with “thin description,” understood to be limited and superficial.

Thick description typically takes a semiotic approach, emphasizing how people construct and convey meaning through signs and symbols, both for themselves and others.

The volume has just been published, which leads me to think about ways in which thick description might be useful to understanding and encouraging intercultural dialogue. The essay describes some research by Jeff Todd Titon which points in a useful direction. Titon is an ethnomusicologist who “proposes a move to multivoiced interpretive accounts, that is, ensuring that multiple voices be heard—not only that of the ethnographer but also those of multiple informants from different positions, exploring potential gaps or disagreements. He emphasizes dialogue (including study participants speaking back to the ethnographer), questioning the analysis, as well as ethnomusicology in the public interest.”

“Ensuring that multiple voices be heard” – now that seems useful to intercultural dialogue! So a thick description will typically involve multiple layers of meanings, supplied by different participants, gathered over time, which together permit a better understanding of human behavior by interweaving separate descriptions into a single, complex whole.

KC25 Metacommunication Translated into Greek

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#25: Metacommunication, which I wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Anastasia Karakitsou has now translated into Greek.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC25 Metacommunication_Greek

Leeds-Hurwitz, W. (2019). Metacommunication [Greek]. (A. Karakitsou, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 25. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2019/01/kc-25-metacommunication_greek.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

KC 38 Boundary Objects Translated into Greek

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#38: Boundary Objects, which I wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Anastasia Karakitsou has now translated into Greek.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC38 Boundary Objects_GreekLeeds-Hurwitz, W. (2018). Politeness [Greek]. (A. Karakitsou, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 38. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2018/11/kc38-boundary-objects_greek.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Calling all Fulbrights!

FulbrightsI am writing a chapter entitled “The Value of a Fulbright: Internationalizing Education One Person at a Time” for inclusion in the volume Internationalizing the Communication Curriculum in an Age of Globalization: Why, What, and How, to be edited by Paaige K. Turner, Soumia Bardhan, Tracey Quigley Holden, and Eddah Mbula Mutua, to be published by Routledge.

There are already 16 stories about Fulbrights posted to this website, but I am now asking these scholars, as well as anyone else who has held any of the various types of Fulbrights, to email me, so that I can include your story in this overview. (In addition, I would like to add more personal narratives about Fulbright experiences to this website, so if you have not yet told me about your experience, let’s talk.) The specific focus in my chapter will be on what happened after you returned to your home campus: how did you revise your own courses or influence others in your department in ways that helped to internationalize the curriculum?

Further details about what I plan to write:

Continue reading “Calling all Fulbrights!”

Holding Local, Not Global, Intercultural Dialogues

Resources in ICD“ width=The new UNESCO Intercultural Dialogue eLearning Platform was described in a prior post. Now, my essay entitled Holding Local, Not Global, Intercultural Dialogues has just been posted to that ePlatform. Their invitation was to write about something in my own domain of expertise. Because my research has always focused on interaction, I wrote about the need to study intercultural dialogue at the interpersonal, local level rather than only the political, global level, as is more common. As an example, I used research about intercultural weddings, published in Wedding as Text: Communicating Cultural Identities Through Ritual, in 2002.

The E-Platform is open to other scholars with interests in intercultural dialogue. As they say, “The platform is an evolving global hub of resources and information to record, inspire, share and exchange innovative and impactful action on intercultural dialogue among diverse audiences.” So contact them directly if you would like to post information about your own or your organization’s activities and/or research.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

KC10: Cross-Cultural Dialogue Translated into Polish

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#10: Cross-Cultural Dialogue, which I wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Michal Szwarc has now translated into Polish.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC10 Cross-cultural dialogue_PolishLeeds-Hurwitz, W. (2018). Cross-cultural dialogue [Polish]. (M. Szwarc, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 10. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2018/01/kc10-cross-cultural-dialogue_polish.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Internationalizing the Communication Discipline

Resources in ICD“ width=After several years of task forces on internationalizing communication, and a special issue of Spectra entitled The Communication Discipline Goes Global, the National Communication Association has now produced a brochure entitled Internationalizing the Communication Discipline. It likely will be useful primarily for those already convinced of the need, who want help in convincing colleagues and administrators.

A related prior resource available on the NCA website is a set of pages describing internationalization, which I prepared for them in 2011. All of the photos provided then have been removed or replaced, and the content has been revised to include specific recommendations from the 2013 task force on internationalization, on which I served. Here’s the introduction, explaining the topic, goals, and audience:

“Internationalization is about taking the rest of the world seriously, not only one’s home country, and can be thought of as the formal term for thinking globally before acting locally. It requires knowing enough about the larger world to act appropriately in a specific context and location, especially when interacting with cultural others. Internationalization is relevant for citizens of all countries, but the following comments are primarily intended for those based in the United States, where internationalization is still often viewed as an option. Internationalization applies to all domains and contexts, but these comments emphasize higher education.”

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

KC5 Intercultural Communication Translated into Greek

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#5: Intercultural Communication, which I published in English in 2014, and which Evelyn Vovou has now translated into Greek.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC5 Intercultural Communication_GreekLeeds-Hurwitz, W. (2017). Intercultural communication [Greek]. (E. Vovou, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 5. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/kc5-intercultural-communication_greek.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.