CFP: Language & Migration (USA)

ConferencesCall for papers: Language and Migration: Experience and Memory, MAY 7-9, 2020, New York City and Princeton University. Deadline: November 1, 2019.

Migration Lab: People and Cultures across Borders, Princeton University and The Study Group on Language and the United Nations announce a collaborative symposium on “Language and Migration: Experience and Memory” MAY 7-9, 2020.

  • Part I, New York City: Thursday May 7 to Friday May 8, noon, will consider how language affects the experiences of permanently or temporarily settled refugees and migrants, those in transit, and the larger population around them. Keynote Speaker: Ingrid Piller, Professor of Applied Linguistics, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.

  • Part II, Princeton University:  Friday evening May 8 to Saturday, May 9, evening, will focus on memory in the cultural work of migrants and immigrants. Keynote Speaker: Viet Thanh Nguyen, Aerol Arnold Professor of English, University of Southern California, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for The Sympathizer.

Language is a vital, but underexplored, factor in the lives of migrants, immigrants and refugees. It has a direct impact on the experiences and choices of individuals displaced by war, terror, or natural disasters and the decisions made by agents who provide (or fail to provide) relief, services, and status. Distilled through memory, it shapes the fictions, poems, memoirs, films and song lyrics in which migrants render loss and displacement, integration and discovery, the translation of history and culture, and the trials of identity.

This interdisciplinary, international symposium on Language and Migration will examine the role of language in the lives and works of migrants.

E-Seminar: Linguistic Diversity & Social Justice

The Linguistic Ethnography Forum will host a free e-seminar devoted to Ingrid Piller’s new book Linguistic Diversity and Social Justice: An Introduction to Applied Sociolinguistics. Please join in this opportunity to discuss the book with the author and a group of leading international scholars.

What: An email-based presentation and discussion of Chapters 1 and 2 of Ingrid Piller, Linguistic Diversity and Social Justice (Oxford University Press, 2016)
When: May 25: Distribution of reading materials; June 01: E-Seminar opens; June 21: E-Seminar closes
Where: The Linguistic Ethnography Forum mailing list
How: Simply sign up to the Linguistic Ethnography Forum mailing list in order to participate
Who: Professor Ingrid Piller as speaker; Dr Huamei Han as discussant; Livia Gerber as moderator; and the list members, including leading international experts in Linguistic Ethnography

Linguistic Ethnography Forum
The Linguistic Ethnography Forum (LEF) brings together researchers conducting linguistic ethnography in the UK and elsewhere. It seeks to explore a range of past and current work, to identify key issues, and to engage in methodologically and theoretically well-tuned debate.

Linguistic Ethnography holds that language and social life are mutually shaping, and that close analysis of situated language use can provide both fundamental and distinctive insights into the mechanisms and dynamics of social and cultural production in everyday activity.
LEF is a Special Interest Group of the British Association of Applied Linguistics (BAAL).
LEF hosts a free annual e-seminar open to all list members.

Linguistic Diversity and Social Justice
Linguistic diversity is a universal characteristic of human language but linguistic diversity is rarely neutral; rather it is accompanied by linguistic stratification and linguistic subordination. Ingrid Piller’s new book Linguistic Diversity and Social Justice employs a case-study approach to real-world instances of linguistic injustice in liberal democracies undergoing rapid change due to high levels of migration and economic globalization. Focusing on the linguistic dimensions of economic inequality, cultural domination and imparity of political participation, this book offers a detailed examination of the connection between linguistic diversity and inequality in domains critical to social justice such as employment, education, and community participation.

The e-seminar will use Chapter 1 (“Introduction”) and Chapter 2 (“Linguistic Diversity and Stratification”) as a starting point for the discussion.

Ingrid Piller is Professor of Applied Linguistics at Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia. Her research expertise is in Intercultural Communication, the Sociolinguistics of Language Learning and Multilingualism, and Bilingual Education. She serves as editor-in-chief of the international sociolinguistics journal Multilingua and curates the sociolinguistics portal Language on the Move.

 

CFP Intercultural Competence in Communication and Education (Malaysia)

Call For Papers
(Deadline for submissions: 31st December 2014)

International Conference on
Intercultural Competence in Communication and Education (ICCEd-2015)
8-9 April 2015

Presented by the Faculty of Modern Languages and Communication,
Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia
In cooperation with the Department of Teacher Education, University of Helsinki, Finland and the Helsinki School of Interculturality

Plenary speakers:
*Adrian Holliday, Professor
University of Canterbury Christ Church, United Kingdom
*Fred Dervin, Professor
University of Helsinki, Finland
*Ingrid Piller, Professor
Macquarie University, Australia
*Ezhar Tamam, Professor
Universiti Putra Malaysia

About the Conference
Contradictorily the concept of intercultural competence is both polysemic and empty at the same time. Researchers, practitioners but also decision makers use it almost mechanically without always worrying about its meaning(s), the ideologies it represents, the impact(s) it has on those who are embedded in its discussions and the injustice it can (too easily) lead to such as neo-racism. A few ‘usual suspects’ – mostly derived from English-speaking researchers/practitioners who enjoy prestige thanks to the symbolic violence of English as a World Language and/or prestigious supranational support – whose work is systematically (and uncritically) mentioned have often managed volens nolens to keep mainstream global understandings of intercultural competence simplified, fuzzy, idealistic and/or unrealistic. For example the ‘faulty’ keywords of culture, tolerance and respect are still present in discussions of intercultural competence.

This call for papers is interested in new, critical and original discussions and approaches to intercultural competence that go beyond these problematic ‘macdonaldised’ models and ‘reinventing the wheel’ perspectives. The conference is interdisciplinary and covers the ‘broad’ fields of communication and education.

The organisers are looking for contributions which are questioning the most ‘influential’ models of intercultural competence and/or who have attempted (un)successfully to develop new understandings and models of intercultural competence. The organisers wish to promote the idea that failure is also inherent to intercultural competence. The question of assessment can be touched upon but the idea that intercultural competence can be summatively assessed should be abandoned. The organisers consider intercultural competence to be synonymous with multicultural competence, cross-cultural competence, global competence, etc. as these labels are also unstable and have many different meanings.

The organisers are especially interested in fresh perspectives from all parts of the world. Historical/diachronic papers ‘denouncing’ reinventing the wheel approaches as well as alternative methods and approaches are very welcome (e.g. use of bodily experiences).

The following themes (among others) can be dealt with:
–  What’s wrong with current approaches? What mistakes have been made in the past and today – especially from researchers’ perspectives?
–  What are the myths around the concept of intercultural competence?
–  Is the idea of intercultural competence a thing of the past? How does it compare to intracultural competence (if such a thing exists)?
–  Can the idea of intercultural competence be really useful for conflictual situations? How can we explain conflicts – which are necessary – beyond the usual suspect of cultural difference?
–   What can we do with old and tired concepts such as identity, culture and community when we talk about intercultural competence?
– How is Intercultural competence understood/taken into consideration in the context of Arabic/English/French/Mandarin… as a lingua franca?
– How do students and e.g. mobile students understand intercultural competence? What seems to influence them?
– How is the ‘teaching’ of intercultural competence implemented in second/foreign language classrooms? Does it echo the teaching of intercultural competence in communication/ management and vice versa?
–  (How) can we move from an individualistic approach to intercultural competence to interactive and co-constructivist ones?
– With increasing use of digital technologies, how does intercultural competence fare?
–  Can neurosciences contribute to renewing the idea of intercultural competence? What about art, music, etc.?

Proposal submission
We invite scholars and professionals to submit proposals (in English) before 31st December 2014. Abstracts should be submitted by email.
Please embed your abstract in the body of your message – no attachment!

Paper and colloquia proposals are invited.
1 Individual paper proposals (200-300 words; duration: 30 minutes including a twenty-minute presentation, with an additional ten minutes for discussion).
2 Colloquia proposals (200 words for the colloquium concept and 200-300 words on each paper, duration: 3h, max. 5 participants – conveners and discussant included)

Please note that only one paper per person can be submitted.
Abstracts will be reviewed by the scientific committee for originality, significance, clarity and academic rigour. Decisions about the submitted papers: 15 January 2015

International publications will report on the conference in 2016-2017 (information forthcoming).

Registrations fees:
Early bird (by 31 January 2015):
•    Local presenters/participants: RM400
•    Local students: RM250
•    International presenters/ participants: US175
•    International students: US145

Registration (1 February- 1 April 2015):
•    Local presenters/ participants RM500
•    Local Students: RM350
•    International presenters/participants US220
•    International students: US190

Partners:
•    Faculty of Modern Languages and Communication, Universiti Putra Malaysia
•    University of Helsinki, Finland
•    Helsinki School of Interculturality, Finland

Scientific Chairs and Chairs of the Organizing Committee:
•    Chairperson: Dr. Régis Machart, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia
•    Deputy Chairperson, Head of the Scientific Committee: Prof. Fred Dervin, University of Helsinki, Finland

International Scientific Committee:
•    Andreotti Vanessa, University of British Columbia, Canada
•    Baker Will, University of Southampton, UK
•    Barbot Marie-José, University of Lille, France
•    Brunila Kristiina, University of Helsinki, Finland
•    Byrd Clark Julie, University of Western, Canada
•    C. K. Raju, Albukhari International University, Malaysia
•    Du Xiangyun, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
•    Holmes Prue, Durham University, UK
•    Kaur Jagdish, University Malaya, Malaysia
•    Kyeyune Robinah, Makerere University, Uganda
•    Phipps Alison, University of Glasgow, UK
•    Risager Karen, University of Roskilde, Denmark
•    Skyrme Gillian, Massey University, New Zealand
•    Trémion Virginie, Catholic University of Paris, France
•    Tushar Chauduri, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong
•    Wolf Alain, University of East Anglia, UK
•    Zotzmann Karin, University of Southampton, U

University of Macau

On April 15, 2013 I gave a talk entitled: “Asking cultural questions: Using ethnography to answer questions about cultural identity” for the Department of Communication at the University of Macau. The topic and case studies provided were related to my research.

UMacau-class

On April 16, 2013, I gave another talk in the Department, entitled “Intercultural dialogue: Catching up to the practitioners.” This talk was related to the Center for Intercultural Dialogue.

small-416 poster

My thanks to Dr. Todd Sandel for organizing these events, and for all the time spent showing me around Macau, and to his students and colleagues for providing such a good audience, and asking provocative questions.

Sandel and graduate students with Leeds-Hurwitz
Sandel and graduate students with Leeds-Hurwitz

While at the University of Macau, I had the opportunity to connect with Dr. Martin Montgomery (Chair Professor and Head of Department), Dr. Timothy Simpson (Associate Dean, Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities), Dr. TAN See Kam, Dr. Annie YANG, Dr. Ozge GIRIT, Dr. Mike Chinoy, and Dr. Andrew Moody. As Dr. Ingrid Piller (at Macquarie University in Australia) also happened to be present to give a talk of her own, I also was able to meet her. I am looking forward to continuing the conversations started on this trip.

Being in Macau was particularly interesting given the combination of Chinese and Portuguese influences on the city. Whether on campus or elsewhere, most signs provide information in Chinese and Portuguese, and often English as well, as documented below.

UMacaulogo

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue