When Culture and Visible Identity Clash

Resources in ICD“ width=

What does Irishness look like? (2018). Directed by Ola Majekodunmi.

What is “Irishness”? And what do you think it looks like? Many have a stereotypical view of this when it comes to mind. However, there is no one way to look Irish.

A raw short video-documentary based on personal stories from 15 different people who are Irish but are often questioned about their identity. It challenges people’s prejudice and opens a discussion on how we think about identity.

 

For a related series of videos, see Yes, I’m Irish, from The Journal of Ireland.

See also Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, #22: Cultural Identity.

Virtual Marathon for Dialogue

Resources in ICD“ width=Virtual Marathon for Dialogue, Anna Lindh Foundation, Alexandria, Egypt (online resource).

The Anna Lindh Foundation Virtual Marathon for Dialogue consists in a series of cultural activities, weekly webinars on main issues for the promotion of EuroMed cultural cooperation, virtual trainings, seminars, exhibitions, debates led by the ALF Networks and partners, and building on all the work the ALF had done in preparation of MedForum 2020.

The main components include:

  • A regional launch event on 30 September 2020, in partnership with IEMED as the Head of the Anna Lindh Foundation Spanish National Network
  • The organization of a series of activities planned within the different programmes of the Foundation between September and December 2020 that will be the occasion to initiate the debate on the state and the future of EuroMed cooperation
  • The presentation of the ALF civil society contribution during the UFM regional Forum between 25 and 27 November in close coordination with the Secretariat of the Union for the Mediterranean
  • The launch of a social media campaign running through 2021 to broadly spread the messaging of the initiative and engaging a large audience and social media influences with a specific focus on youth
  • A traditional media campaign and coverage of the Virtual Marathon for Dialogue activities at the EuroMed level
  • A programme of virtual activities as mentioned earlier including regional conferences, workshops, exhibitions, trainings and debates in the first semester of 2021 to be organised in coordination with the ALF Heads of Network and network members as well as some of the ALF partners
  • And final regional outcomes activity in Croatia in 2021 where they had planned to implement MEDForum 2020

US Institute of Peace Offers Online Courses for Free in 2020

Intercultural PedagogyEntire catalog of online courses tuition-free, United States Institute of Peace, Washington, DC. Deadline: December 31, 2020.

As the coronavirus pandemic forces us to change the ways in which we interact with one another and as people across the United States and the world demand racial justice, today’s peacebuilders are in need of increased access to resources and tools to support them in transforming conflict. To meet that demand, the U.S. Institute of Peace is offering its entire catalog of online courses tuition-free from now until the end of 2020.

Course topics include: civil resistance, conflict analysis, community-based dialogue, peacebuilding, negotiation, and more, as well as access to the game Mission: Zhobia.

 

Wikipedia Entry for Intercultural Dialogue

Resources in ICD“ width=Daniel Mateo Ordóñez recently pointed out that Wikipedia did not yet have an article on intercultural dialogue, so I wrote one. That entry is now published.

 

If there are topics related to the concept that you would like to see included, send an email, or post a comment below.

As a reminder, CID does have its own Wikipedia entry, created several years ago, with the help of Minh Cao. Similarly, if there are additional topics you would like to see included on that entry, let me know.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

Intercultural/Interracial Dialogue at Home

Resources in ICD“ width=Intercultural connections of all kinds (race, ethnicity, nationality, religion) happen at two levels – in public, and in private. Most research focuses on the former, but there is much to be gained by studying the latter. People who have intercultural friends have to discuss and face their differences, and find a way to manage them, and this is even more true for intercultural couples and families, who often are making a longer term commitment to an Other. There is a growing literature addressing the topic.

A few relevant sources follow.

Breger, R., & Hill, R. (Eds.). (1998). Cross-cultural marriage: Identity and choice. Oxford, UK: Berg.

Bystydzienski, J. (2011). Intercultural couples: Crossing boundaries, negotiating difference. New York NY: New York University Press.

Dervin, F. (2013). Do intercultural couples “see culture everywhere”? Case studies from couples who share a lingua franca in Finland and Hong Kong. Civilisations, 62, 1–15.

Gonçalves, K. (2013). Conversations of intercultural couples. Berlin, Germany: Akademie Verlag.

Inman, A. G., Altman, A., Kaduvettoor‐Davidson, A. N. J. U., Carr, A., & Walker, J. A. (2011). Cultural intersections: A qualitative inquiry into the experience of Asian Indian–White interracial couples. Family Process, 50(2), 248-266.

Johnson, E. D. (2020). Say I’m dead: A family memoir of race, secrets and love. Chicago, IL: Lawrence Hill Books.

Karris, T., & Killian, K. (Eds.). (2009). Intercultural couples: Exploring diversity in intimate relationships. London, UK: Routledge.

Lee, Pei-Wen. (2006). Bridging cultures: Understanding the construction of relational identity in intercultural friendship. Journal of Intercultural Communication Research, 35(1), 3-22.

Leeds-Hurwitz, W. (2002). Wedding as text: Communicating cultural identities through ritual. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Leeds-Hurwitz, W. (Ed.). (2005). From generation to generation: Maintaining cultural identity over time. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press.

Martinez, L. V., Ting-Toomey, S., & Dorjee, T. (2016). Identity management and relational culture in interfaith marital communication in a United States context: A qualitative study. Journal of Intercultural Communication Research, 45(6), 503-525.

McFadden, J. (2001). Intercultural marriage and family: Beyond the racial divide. The Family Journal, 9(1), 39-42.

Moscato, G., Novara, C., Hombrados-Mendieta, I., Romano, F., & Lavanco, G. (2014). Cultural identification, perceived discrimination and sense of community as predictors of life satisfac- tion among foreign partners of intercultural families in Italy and Spain: A transnational study. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 40, 22–33.

Piller, I. (2002). Bilingual couples talk: The discursive construction of hybridity. Amsterdam, Netherlands: John Benjamins.

Piller, I. (2007). Cross-cultural communication in intimate relationships. In H. Kotthoff & H. Spencer-Oatey (Eds.), Handbook of intercultural communication (pp. 341–359). Berlin, Germany: Mouton de Gruyter.

Romano, D. (2008). Intercultural marriage: Promises and pitfalls. Nicholas Brealey.

Sandel, T. L. (2015). Brides on sale: Taiwanese cross border marriages in a globalizing Asia. New York: Peter Lang.

Tili, T. R., & Barker, G. G. (2015). Communication in intercultural marriages: Managing cultural differences and conflicts. Southern Communication Journal, 80(3), 189-210.

Wilczek‐Watson, M. (2017). Intercultural intimate relationships. In Y. Y. Kim (Ed.), The international encyclopedia of intercultural communication. New York: Wiley. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118783665.ieicc0058

See also Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue #1 on Intercultural Dialogue, #96 on Interreligious Dialogue, #12 on Third Culture Kids and #94 on Cross-Cultural Kids.

 

UNESCO: Culture & COVID-19

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Culture & COVID-19: Impact and Response Tracker, UNESCO, Paris, France.

Culture & Covid Issue 10

To address the profound impact the COVID-19 pandemic will have on the culture sector, UNESCO has launched a weekly “Culture & COVID-19: Impact and Response Tracker” to provide an overview of the rapidly evolving situation. It explores both the immediate impact of the health crisis and examples of how countries around the world are adapting to the situation. This is one of several initiatives by the Organization to respond to the impact of the pandemic on the cultural sector worldwide.

Ten issues have already appeared, examining such issues as the impact on world heritage sites, tourism, museums, archaeological sites, and indigenous peoples.

ICD Resource Center, Anna Lindh Foundation

Resources in ICD“ width=Intercultural Dialogue Resource Centre, Anna Lindh Foundation, Alexandria, Egypt.

The Anna Lindh Foundation has launched the Intercultural Dialogue Resource Centre in order to make research, good practices, learning activities, expertise and events on intercultural dialogue in the Euro-Mediterranean accessible to everyone. The Centre contains information on more than 100 curated academic publications and the biographies and contact information for 100 experts. It also offers visitors a selection of journalistic articles, events, learning activities developed especially for civil society and around 30 good practices presenting successful projects addressing a variety of issues relating to intercultural encounters, trends and affairs in the Euro-Mediterranean region.

Created in 2005, the Anna Lindh Foundation is an inter-governmental institution established by the countries of the Euro-Mediterranean partnership and the European Union in the framework of the Barcelona Process as the central institution for intercultural dialogue among the peoples of the region.

Conflict & Society Moving to Open Access in 2020

Resources in ICD“ width=Conflict and Society is a part of the Berghahn Open Anthro subscribe-to-open initiative, a pilot aiming to convert 13 Anthropology journals to full Open Access on an on-going and sustainable basis, starting with their volumes published in 2020.

Subscribe-to-open is a model of sustainable open access for scholarly journals in which institutions continue to “subscribe” to the journals that their communities value at similar prices and with the same quality as when those same journals were accessed under a conventional subscription. Subscribe-to-open is a form of subscription that allows libraries to direct funds through the same subscription channels routinely used to provide journal access to their own researcher community, while also supporting the journals’ readership across a wider community as an open access publication. In addition, if an institution has also established open access funds to support transitional initiatives or author open access publication, then these funds may also be used for this model through a simpler, journal-level process.

Thick Description as a Tool for ICD

Resources in ICD“ width=Leeds-Hurwitz, W. (2019). Thick description. In P. Atkinson, S. Delamont, M.A. Hardy, & M. Williams (Eds.), SAGE research methods foundations [Online]. doi: 10.4135/9781526421036765746

Several years ago I was asked to write about “thick description,” a concept used mostly by ethnographers. Briefly, thick description recognizes complexity and the role of context. It is often contrasted with “thin description,” understood to be limited and superficial.

Thick description typically takes a semiotic approach, emphasizing how people construct and convey meaning through signs and symbols, both for themselves and others.

The volume has just been published, which leads me to think about ways in which thick description might be useful to understanding and encouraging intercultural dialogue. The essay describes some research by Jeff Todd Titon which points in a useful direction. Titon is an ethnomusicologist who “proposes a move to multivoiced interpretive accounts, that is, ensuring that multiple voices be heard—not only that of the ethnographer but also those of multiple informants from different positions, exploring potential gaps or disagreements. He emphasizes dialogue (including study participants speaking back to the ethnographer), questioning the analysis, as well as ethnomusicology in the public interest.”

“Ensuring that multiple voices be heard” – now that seems useful to intercultural dialogue! So a thick description will typically involve multiple layers of meanings, supplied by different participants, gathered over time, which together permit a better understanding of human behavior by interweaving separate descriptions into a single, complex whole.

Communication Styles (by Country)

Resources in ICD“ width=The Centre for Intercultural Learning has created a set of explanations of communication styles and other cultural information published on the Global Affairs Canada website.

These descriptions cover not only Canada, intended to be helpful to those traveling to that country, but dozens of other countries, presumably mostly for Canadians traveling abroad. Topics range from what is typically addressed in a first conversation with someone (for Canada, “what do you do?” meaning in terms of work or occupation) to relationship-building (“meals are good spaces for building rapport”).

The Centre for Intercultural Learning is part of the Canadian Foreign Service Institute of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada.