CID Report for UNESCO Futures of Education

“UNESCO”UNESCO invited CID to host focus groups as part of the Futures of Education Initiative. Three focus groups held discussions in January. The report has now been completed, and submitted to UNESCO.

We are delighted that UNESCO invited our participation, and hopeful that they will incorporate our recommendations into their final conclusions. A copy of the report may be had by clicking on the image below.

CID Focus Groups report for UNESCO

Thanks to Linda de Wit, former CID intern and skilled graphic designer, for taking on the project of turning the written report into a polished final document. Thanks to Nazan Haydari, Advisory Board member, for moderating one of the focus groups, and managing the technology for all of them. Thanks to all of the participants, who are named in the report, for their ideas, their time, and their energy for this project.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

UNESCO Futures of Education Focus Groups Completed

“UNESCO”

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue held 3 focus groups as part of the UNESCO Futures of Education Initiative, January 28, 29, and 30, 2021.

UNESCO Futures of EducationThanks first to Nazan Haydari, member of the CID Advisory Board, who who served as moderator of one of the groups, and organized the technology through Istanbul Bilgi University.

Thanks next to all of the participants for all of their ideas. They included: Evangelos Afendras (Greece), Chukwuemeka Amajo (Nigeria), Diana Bebenova-Nikolova (Bulgaria), Giovanna Carloni (Italy), Ivett Rita Guntersdorfer (Germany), Mohammed Guamguami (Morocco), Maria Hussain (UK), Teresa Joseph (India), Emilija Jovanovska (USA/Macedonia)
Lasana Kazembe (USA), Sergei Kladko (Russia), Maura Di Mauro (Italy), Katrien Mertens (Belgium), Isabel Mohedano Sohm (Spain), M. L. Papusa Molina (Mexico), Maja Nenadovic (Netherlands), Sushil Oswal (USA), Chris Peltier (France), Anne-Nelly Perret-Clermont (Switzerland), Yehuda Silverman (Canada/USA), and Arianna Vettorazzi (Netherlands/Italy).

The report synthesizing our discussions will be completed, submitted to UNESCO, and posted to this site shortly. [update: now posted here]

For everyone else with an interest in the topic but who was unable to respond quickly enough to participate, in addition to the relevant publications posted previously, UNESCO has now offered several additional possibilities:

Passive participation: you may follow the developments on their website, as they post updates.

Active engagement: there are several possibilities:

  • Take the 1-minute survey on the top 3 challenges and purposes of education
  • Write your thoughts on what they see as the one major issue for the futures of education (max 1000 words).
  • Submit an original artwork of what education might look like in 2050.

Update: UNESCO Futures of Education Focus Groups

“UNESCO”

Update, UNESCO Futures of Education focus groups organized by the Center for Intercultural Dialogue.

 

UNESCO Futures of EducationFirst, thanks to all those who immediately responded to last week’s invitation by saying they want to participate in a focus group on this topic, and contribute ideas to the UNESCO Commission. Participation is now closed, and we’re actively organizing to hold multiple focus groups, as a way to include as many people as possible. (UNESCO requested one focus group; we’ll be giving them three.)

Second, thanks to Nazan Haydari, member of the CID Advisory Board, who has agreed to serve as one of the focus group leaders. The other two will be led by Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, CID Director. [update: final report now posted here]

For everyone else with an interest in the topic but who was unable to respond quickly enough to participate, the following are relevant materials to read.

Publications on education produced by prior UNESCO Commissions, which serve as the background for this one:

Faure, E., et al. (1972). Learning to be: The world of education today and tomorrow. Paris: UNESCO.

Delors, J. (1996). Learning: The treasure within; report to UNESCO of the International Commission on Education for the Twenty-first Century. Paris: UNESCO.

Elfert, M. (2015). Learning to live together: Revisiting the humanism of the Delors report. Education Research and Foresight Working Papers, 12.

UNESCO. (2015). Rethinking education: Towards a global common good? Paris: UNESCO.

Materials already produced by the current Commission:

UNESCO. (2020). Visioning and framing the Futures of Education. Paris: UNESCO.

UNESCO. (2020). Education in a post-COVID world: Nine ideas for public action. Paris: UNESCO.

UNESCO Invites Contributions to Futures of Education initiative

“UNESCO”If you are interested in participating in a cooperative CID-UNESCO focus group on the role of intercultural dialogue in the futures of education, then please read the following and send an email immediately as this event will be scheduled for late January at a mutually convenient day/time. We cannot guarantee participation, as this will be a small group, but you will also be able to organize your own event if so desired. There will only be one meeting, and then a report of the discussion sent in to UNESCO. 

UPDATE: Several focus groups are now full, thanks to the many responses – more details to be posted shortly as there are results to report. [Second update: the final report is now posted here]

UNESCO Futures of Education

UNESCO’s Futures of Education initiative is an ambitious attempt to rethink education and help shape the future. The initiative is catalyzing a global debate on how education, learning and knowledge need to be re-imagined in a world of increasing complexity, uncertainty, and precarity.

As part of this initiative, UNESCO has appointed a high-level International Commission of thought leaders with diverse expertise and perspectives from the worlds of politics, academia, the arts, science and business. The International Commission will prepare a report, to be released in November 2021, that will provide an agenda for action and discussion by policymakers and practitioners.

The report of the International Commission will emerge out of a range of work modalities that emphasize co-creation, a broad participatory and partnership structure, the inclusion of diverse perspectives, and the absence of pre-specified conclusions. Towards this end, UNESCO is encouraging individuals, organizations and networks to organize focus group discussions with their constituencies, inputs from which will feed into to the Commission’s work.

The objective of these consultations is to generate a set of diverse perspectives on the challenges and opportunities for education and learning that can be both anticipated/predicted and imagined/envisioned when looking towards the year 2050. Rethinking as well as fully reimagining the way we live together are key dimensions explored by UNESCO; this is why the Center for Intercultural Dialogue has been approached to mobilize its members in the organization of a focus group discussion. Please send an email asap if you wish to participate!

Holding Local, Not Global, Intercultural Dialogues

“UNESCO”The new UNESCO Intercultural Dialogue eLearning Platform was described in a prior post. Now, my essay entitled Holding Local, Not Global, Intercultural Dialogues has just been posted to that ePlatform. Their invitation was to write about something in my own domain of expertise. Because my research has always focused on interaction, I wrote about the need to study intercultural dialogue at the interpersonal, local level rather than only the political, global level, as is more common. As an example, I used research about intercultural weddings, published in Wedding as Text: Communicating Cultural Identities Through Ritual, in 2002.

The E-Platform is open to other scholars with interests in intercultural dialogue. As they say, “The platform is an evolving global hub of resources and information to record, inspire, share and exchange innovative and impactful action on intercultural dialogue among diverse audiences.” So contact them directly if you would like to post information about your own or your organization’s activities and/or research.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

UNESCO e-Platform on ICD

“UNESCO”UNESCO has created an e-platform for intercultural dialogue. It is designed to be “a global collaborative hub” intended “to promote good practices  from all over the world, that enable to build bridges between people from diverse backgrounds in order to create more inclusive societies through mutual understanding and respect for diversity.”

One major section presents short explanations of about 2 dozen relevant core concepts, from intercultural dialogue to cultural identity to intercultural citizenship. These will be particularly familiar to all those who have previously read Intercultural Competences: A conceptual and operational framework from 2013, which I drafted for UNESCO (with many contributions by others named in the notes), as they all come directly from that publication. The new e-platform describes that booklet as “A comprehensive reference publication on the basic terminology needed in order to develop intercultural competences and to permit intercultural dialogue, as well as outlining a series of minimally necessary steps to take in sharing this knowledge with the largest number of others, across the greatest selection of contexts, possible.”

Another major section provides a wide range of resources documenting best practices for a wide range of topics, from awareness raising to advocacy, from celebrating diversity to capacity building, and from research to policy advice. CID publications have been submitted to be added to the list. This section is open to contributions from anyone who is doing relevant work and wants it noted. (Just click on the “Login/Registration” button on the top right of any page.)

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

Intercultural Competences – UNESCO

“UNESCO”UNESCO has just published “Intercultural competences: A conceptual and operational framework.” (Paris, France: UNESCO, 2013).

interculturalcomp_cover

This document is a synthesis of, and expansion upon, the numerous documents prepared for, and especially the discussion held during, the UNESCO Experts Meeting on Intercultural Competences, October 21-22, 2011, in Paris, France, organized by the Intersectoral Platform for a Culture of Peace and Non-Violence under the coordination of Katérina Stenou (who also serves as a member of this Center’s Advisory Board). The report benefited particularly from the following sources: a) five regional reports prepared by Milena Dragićević Šešić & Sanjin Dragojević, Alejandro Grimson, Prue Holmes, Melissa Steyn, and Magdi Youssef; b) a synthesis thereof by Darla Deardoff; and c) the stimulating discussions at the experts’ meeting, which included not only all of the regional report authors except Dragojević and Steyn, but also Eric Cattelain, Yolanda Onghena, Hanna Schissler, and Yves Winkin. In addition, many of UNESCO’s Chairs on Interreligious Dialogue for Intercultural Understanding joined the discussion on October 22, 2011. I drafted this report on behalf of the group, and with considerable input from the others, as well as from UNESCO staff. My thanks to Katérina Stenou for involving me in this project, and to the amazing set of international colleagues I met during the process.

This was the first time I was asked to participate in the design of a publication as well as the content, so I also thank the designers involved in the process for teaching me so much. The images of people or writing included in the report were provided by UNESCO; all of the other photographs were taken either by me or my husband on our international travels over the past several years. The cover uses a photograph of a hotel window in downtown Coimbra, Portugal, taken while I was there as a Fulbright Senior Scholar – the ultimate result of a connection made by Eric Cattelain at the experts meeting, and a good example of just the sort of expanding international network that this Center is designed to facilitate.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue

(See this discussion of the document by AFS.)

Update: Now available also in Arabic, FrenchSpanish and Russian.

2nd World Forum Intercultural Dialogue

The 2nd World Forum on Intercultural Dialogue will be held from May 29 to June 1, 2013 in Baku, Azerbaijan in partnership with UNESCO, UN Alliance of Civilizations, UN World Tourism Organization, Council of Europe, CoE North-South Center and ISESCO. The opening ceremony and the lst East-West Ministerial Conference will take place on May 30, 2013.

The program of the upcoming forum implies several sessions and side events to be prepared and led by partner organizations, including the celebration of “Do one thing for Diversity and Inclusion,” Intercultural Innovation Award ceremony for Central Asia, Black Sea and Mediterranean regions, 1st Alumni Meeting of the “Emerging Leaders Network,” the workshops “Intercultural Dialogue through History Teaching: Best Practices and Challenges,” and “Urban policies for diversity in 21st century: the Intercultural Cities paradigm,” the sessions of “Tourism as a key driver of mutual understanding and tolerance among cultures,” “The New Era of Globalization: Hybridity of cultures in a changing world” and “Capitals of Culture: Trends and roles, intercultural dialogue through faith and science,” etc.

The 1st World Forum on Intercultural Dialogue was held on April 7-9, 2011, also in Baku. More than 500 representatives from 102 countries and many international organizations, NGOs, media representatives, scholars, experts, etc. participated. Details about that event, and this Center’s participation in it, available here.

Save

World Forum on Intercultural Dialogue – Report

On April 7-9, 2011, the World Forum on Intercultural Dialogue was held in Baku, Azerbaijan. I gave a presentation entitled: “Dialogue about Dialogue: Taking a (Meta)Communication Perspective on the Role of Women in Intercultural Dialogue.” All presentations will be posted to the Forum site in the near future, and published in a proceedings volume.

The World Forum was supported by the UN Alliance of Civilizations, UNESCO, Council of Europe, North-South Center of the Council of Europe, ISESCO and Euronews. Building on several prior events, the Forum highlighted intercultural dialogue as one of the most pressing challenges that the global community faces today. The forum addressed conceptual, governmental, policy and practical aspects of intercultural dialogue, providing an opportunity for sharing good practices and making new connections. In addition, since the event was hosted by the President of Azerbaijan, we were all treated as guests of the state, and went everywhere with a security escort. Highlights were the formal entertainment and elaborate banquets on both Thursday and Friday evenings. Upon our arrival, we were given not only the usual conference program, small notebook and briefcase labeled with the conference information, but also dozens of brochures and a guidebook about Azerbaijan. When we returned from closing ceremonies, a gift package was waiting, with a small handmade carpet and hand-painted silk scarf (local craft specialties), a mug and local tea, as well as a bronze plaque noting our participation. In fact, there were so many presents that I mailed them back to the US rather than carry them around with me for the next several months.

The Forum was opened by the President of the Republic of Azerbaijan, His Excellency Mr. IIham Aliyev. The plenary panel on which I participated was “Women as Key Agents of Intercultural Dialogue.” This panel was co-chaired by Dr. Katérina Stenou (Director, Cultural Policy and Intercultural Dialogue, UNESCO, and member of this Center’s Advisory Board) and the First Lady of Azerbaijan, Ms. Mehriban Aliyeva (she is also President of the Heydar Aliyev Foundation, and UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador). Rapporteur for the panel was Ms. Pramila Patten (CEDAW expert). The other panelists were: Ms. Hijran Huseynova (Chairperson of the State Committee on Family, Women and Children Affairs, Azerbaijan); Ms. S.Y.Orlova (Deputy chair of Council of Parliament of Russian Federation), Ms. Rachida Dati (Mayor of the 7th arrondissement of Paris), Ms. Concepcion Olavarrieta (Chair of the Mexican Node of  the Millennium Project), Ms. Mbarka Bouaida (Member of Parliament, Morocco), and Mr. Alexander Ageev, (General Director of Institute of Economic Strategies, Department of Humanitarian Sciences, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russian Federation). Respondents to the panel included several ministers of culture, as well as Dr. Ruth Halperin-Kaddari (Director, The Ruth and Emanuel Rackman Center for the Advancement of Women’s Status, Bar-Ilan University, Israel), Dr. Bibi Bakare-Yusuf (publisher of Casava Republic Press, based in Abuja, Nigeria), and Ms. Natalia Molebatsi (performance poet and storyteller, based in South Africa).

The majority of the Forum’s participants were ministers of culture or other politicians (and I did meet a few, including Ms. Irina Cajal-Marin, Under Secretary of State for the Ministry of Culture in Romania, and Mr. Ali Elamin, Director of the Minister’s Office for Sudan). Others were CEOs of NGOs or non-profits (and among those I met were Ms. Wajiha Haris, President of Scheherazade, in Bucharest, Romania, Dr. Catherine Fieschi, Director of Counterpoint, just separated from the British Council, in London, Ms. Lila de Chaves, President of Heritage & Museums, in Athens, and Mr. Peter Gorgievski, CEO of Global Dialogue Foundation in Moonee Ponds, Australia). There were also a number of people connected to one of the international organizations co-sponsoring the event (I met several, including Mr. Hans d’Orville, Assistant Director-General for Strategic Planning of UNESCO in Paris, Dr. Liubava Moreva, Program Specialist for Culture in UNESCO’s Moscow office, and Ms. Neslihan Demirkol Sonmez, representing the Turkish National Commission for UNESCO; as well as Dr. Mir Asghar Husain, of the North-South Centre Think Tank for the Council of Europe). There were even a few other faculty present (I met Dr. Darla K. Deardorff, Executive Director of the Association  of International Education Administrators, based at Duke University in the US). And these are only some of those with whom I exchanged business cards – I am looking forward to continuing conversations with dozens of people as a result of the event.

Two other events occurred simultaneously with the Forum, an academic conference (“Traditions and prospects for intercultural dialogue in CIS countries: culture, education and communication”), as well as the first convention of the Global Youth Movement for the Alliance of Civilizations, and so I met some individuals from each of those events. For example, Ms. Emilia Katosang (Deputy Permanent Representative, Permanent Mission of Palau to the UN) and Ivaylo Stoimenov (a Bulgarian journalist) were both part of the GYM meeting; Prof. Samir Sleiman (cultural anthropologist in Lebanon, and Editor in Chief of Le Debat) presented at the academic conference. I also met several of the many international journalists covering the event, including Mr. Mohammad Malick, of The News, in Pakistan, and Mr. Ghassan Ali Osman, covering the event for Sudan. And, like most of the presenters, I was interviewed for Azerbaijani television. The audience was so large (600-1000, depending on whether participants of the 3 events overlapped at the same event or not), that two screens were used to ensure everyone could view the speakers. Look for images of Katérina Stenou on screen, and then being interviewed in the gallery included below.

Ms. Samaya Mammodova and Ms. Chinara Shakarova, two English majors studying in Baku, were assigned to help the dozen participants from the USA. Since I had a few hours free Saturday morning, after the conference concluded but before leaving for the airport, they took me on a personal tour of Icheri Shekhar (the old city in Baku). A few photos are below, for those who have not yet been to Baku themselves, along with photos of the conference.

My thanks to Katérina Stenou for my invitation to participate in this fascinating event. And thanks to Neslihan Demirkol Sonmez for 2 of the photos included below (the one of the dinner celebration, and 4 of us talking).

Euronews video coverage of the event is now available online. (I’m included, but as part of a conversational grouping, so look carefully!)

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


World Forum on Intercultural Dialogue

The Government of Azerbaijan is organising a “World Forum on Intercultural Dialogue”, to be held in Baku from 7 to 9 April 2011. The initiative has the support of the Council of Europe, including the North-South Centre, UNESCO, the UN Alliance of Civilizations and ISESCO. Building on previous events on this theme held in the Azerbaijani capital – known as the “Baku process” – and on the corpus of work developed by the stakeholder organisations in recent years, the Forum highlights the fact that intercultural dialogue is one of the most pressing challenges in the world today.

The Forum will address the conceptual, governance, policy and practical aspects of the challenge of intercultural dialogue. It will tackle issues such as the barriers to dialogue and the diverse contexts in which it can be pursued. It will also provide an opportunity to share good practice and launch new initiatives. A wide range of practitioners and experts in the field of culture will attend the Forum, from global leaders and public figures to prominent intellectuals and activists. The synergy between political leaders and officials, experts and practitioners will be encouraged by the scope for informal networking organised around the event.”

(Original from http://www.coe.int/t/dg4/cultureheritage/culture/CDCULT/Newsletter/newsletter2_en.asp)