USIP: Dialogue & Peace Process Support (USA)

“Job

Senior Expert, Dialogue and Peace Process Support, United States Institute of Peace, Washington, DC. Deadline: Open until filled, posted January 23, 2020.

The Senior Expert position will serve as program lead on promoting and enhancing dialogue as a predominant peacebuilding method for the Inclusive Peace Processes Team, which is located in USIP’s Center for Applied Conflict Transformation. The Senior Expert will oversee USIP’s thought leadership on dialogue as well as develop practice, particularly to support transformation in peace processes globally. This position will provide strategic guidance and practice-oriented training, and serve as a comparative analyst on issues related to dialogues including political dialogues and consultations, intercultural dialogues, national dialogues, track II dialogue, among others.

The Inclusive Peace Processes team provides support to a range of internal and external stakeholders working at various stages of peace processes. The team provides capacity-building support as well as technical expertise on issues related to peace processes such as power-sharing, ceasefires, and mediation support. The Senior Expert will report to the Director, Inclusive Peace Processes and Reconciliation. This position will be a Full-Time position, however ISIP is open to include candidates that are available to work Part-Time as well.

2020 Video Competition and Listening

CID Video CompetitionThis year’s CID Video Competition has as its theme listening, on the grounds that listening is how intercultural dialogue starts. In these days of the Coronavirus pandemic, a very different video on listening has been circulating. Despite the fact that it has no other connection to the competition, it is well worth watching. It is titled #Ascolta in the original Italian, and An imagined letter from COVID-19 to humans in the English. Perhaps it will give ideas to those who are preparing videos for the CID competition.

Video made by: Darinka Montico
Written by: Kristin Flyntz [link goes to complete text]
Music: Cold Isolation · David Fesliyan [link goes to the album]
Subtitle Edit: Iris Kalpouzou

KC35 Media Ecology Translated into Turkish

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#35: Media Ecology, which Casey Man Kong Lum wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Uygar Doğan has now translated into Turkish.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized alphabetically by conceptchronologically by publication date and number, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC35 Media Ecology_Turkish

Lum, C. M. K. (2020). Medya ekolojisi. (U. Doğan, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 35. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/kc35-media-ecology_turkish.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Loughborough U Residential Fellowships (UK)

Fellowships

Residential Fellowships, Institute for Advanced Studies Loughborough University, Leicestershire, England, UK. Deadline: 15 May 2020.

Loughborough University’s Institute of Advanced Studies has announced a major new initiative, the IAS Residential Fellowship programme, which will begin from September 2020. The Residential Fellowship programme adds significantly to the current portfolio of opportunities offered by the Institute to bring leading international scholars to the University as IAS Fellows.

IAS Residential Fellowships are open to outstanding international researchers from across all disciplines and career stages who wish to pursue a month-long research residency within the scholarly community of Loughborough University and its Institute of Advanced Studies.

CFP Contemporary Media Culture & Society (Argentina)

ConferencesCall for papers: Contemporary Developments on Media, Culture and Society: Argentina and Latin America, The Center for the Study of Media and Society in Argentina (MESO), Universidad de San Andrés, Buenos Aires, Argentina, August 27-28, 2020. Deadline: April 30, 2020.

Submissions should contribute to ongoing conversations about media, culture, and society in empirical, theoretical or methodological ways. They might also broaden our knowledge about the relationship between media, culture, and society at the national and regional level. Articles may refer to different aspects of communication, media, and cultural goods and services in the areas of journalism, entertainment, cinema, theater, television, music, etc. – advertising and marketing, public relations, social media, and video games, among others. This sixth annual conference is sponsored by the Center for Global Culture and Communication at Northwestern University.

CID Video Competition FAQ 2020

Job adsIn past CID Video Competitions, a number of questions have been asked. In hopes this will help others, they are posted here, along with answers. As new questions are asked, they will be added and answered. 

Please read the basic information for the CID Video Competition in 2020, including especially the entry rules, carefully! If submissions do not meet the requirements, they cannot be considered for a prize until and unless they are revised. When ready, submit your video. [Link for uploading to be added May 1]

But…coronavirus!
At this point the competition is still on, despite the pandemic. Some instructors have suggested this can be a particularly useful assignment for courses suddenly moved online. If there is a change, it will be clearly posted, but it is most likely to be an extended deadline rather than a cancellation. So go ahead and make your videos!

This year’s topic is listening. What does that entail?
Listening means paying attention to someone else rather than focusing on your own words and ideas. This is easiest with someone you know well, and hardest with a stranger, especially if that person shares few characteristics with you. But listening is the start of intercultural dialogue, so it’s important. For more details, see this list of additional Resources.

What exactly is intercultural dialogue, anyway?
The short answer: Intercultural dialogue requires at least two people from different cultural groups (so, it can be international, interracial, interethnic, or interfaith). It is active (people actually communicating in some way, having dialogue) rather than passive (knowledge in people’s heads). Here’s a longer answer: Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 1: Intercultural Dialogue. For more details, see this list of additional Resources.

What about intergenerational dialogue, is that intercultural as well?
NO, intergenerational dialogue within a single culture is not usually considered a form of intercultural dialogue. An argument could presumably be made, but that may be difficult given the short time limit for the video.

Can a group of students submit a video instead of one person?
Yes, absolutely. In fact, that is encouraged, as the perfect way to demonstrate listening to different points of view.

How many people maximum in a group are allowed?
Whatever works best for the students – and the instructor in a particular course if the competition is being used as a class assignment – will be fine. We’ve never set a limit.

Can faculty members participate?
NO, this is a competition for students only. Faculty members can serve as informal advisers or critics, and are certainly asked to encourage participation, or even require participation as part of a course if that suits their needs. But faculty members should NOT be part of the group that actually works on the video, and should NOT be the one submitting a video.

Can audiotapes be submitted in lieu of videotapes?
NO, sorry, audiotapes are NOT videotapes.

Where should videos be uploaded?
The link will be added by May 1. You will have to create an account when you get to the site, with your email, name, and a password. Videos should NOT be uploaded directly to YouTube or any other server, please!

Help, I don’t understand the directions when I get to the upload site!
You are asked to “Login or create an account.” The first time there, you need to choose “Create an account,” which requires providing your email address, first name, last name, and making up a password which you provide twice to confirm. Then click on “Register.” At that point you need to answer the questions on the application. If you don’t finish the first time, when you go back to the site, choose “Login” and then finish. Your email is your “Login ID” and the password is the same one you provided when you created the account.

My students are having difficulty submitting their videos. Can a faculty member help with this step?
YES, absolutely. The goal is to have student-created videos. There’s no problem with a faculty member helping to get those videos uploaded so they can be entered in the competition. However, please do NOT do it for them – the account should not be in the faculty member’s name. Let the student create an account, and then help as needed with any technical or translations issues.

My students created videos for this competition as a course assignment, so there are several different videos to be uploaded. Does each video need to be submitted separately?
YES, absolutely. Each video, whether created by one student or by a group of students, should be uploaded separately so it can be evaluated by the judges.

Four of us worked on a video together. Do we submit it once or 4 times?
ONLY ONCE! A group video should be submitted once, with all students who worked on the video being listed as creators. Choose a student who checks their email fairly often as the one to upload the video, so if there are any questions, they will see the email and be able to respond.

Can 30-minute videos be considered?
What part of “no less than 30 seconds, no more than 2 minutes” is unclear?

Is there a language requirement for the videos?
YES, the videos either must be in English or subtitled in English. Permitting other languages would imply having judges who know all the several dozen languages currently represented on the site, which would be impossible. However, choosing to have most of the video silent, with few words, or using another language with English subtitles, are appropriate ways to finesse the language requirement for those who are not native speakers.

Do the videos have to be live action?
NO, animation has been successfully incorporated into several submissions in the past. However, a PowerPoint slideshow is unlikely to result in an award, as that doesn’t make a very successful video.

I want to use video I made of a group singing a song in live performance. I have their permission, but not that of the copyright holder for that song. Is that fair use?

Unfortunately, the short answer is no, you would need permission of the copyright holder of the song. The long answer is that for all fair use questions, see the Documentary Filmmakers Statement of Best Practices in Fair Use and the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Online Video; these and other such best-practices codes are available from the Center for Media and Social Impact.

UCL: Language Learning and Intercultural Communication (UK)

“Job

Professor of Language Learning and Intercultural Communication, Institute of Education, University College London (UCL), London, UK. Deadline: 9 April 2020.

The postholder will provide strategic leadership in the development of research and teaching in the areas of intercultural communication and modern language education, at the IOE and across UCL. The Professor will work with a team of academics whose expertise spans a range of areas in diverse education contexts.

You will develop and lead a new Master’s programme in Intercultural Communication for Language Teaching and Learning, and to lead on the development of an effective research strategy that enables the team to work towards national and international recognition of their work.

Kent State U: Center for International/Intercultural Education (USA)

“Job

Director, Center for International and Intercultural Education, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, USA. Deadline: May 1, 2020.

Kent State seeks a full-time Director for the Gerald H. Read Center for International and Intercultural Education. The successful applicant will lead the mission and activities of the Center and the College of Education, Health, and Human Services in its international and intercultural programming. The Center serves as a catalyst for the advancement of international and intercultural education at Kent State University and beyond. The Director reports directly to the Dean of the College.

CFP: Immigrant Generations, Media Representations and Audiences

“Publication

Call for Proposals: Immigrant Generations, Media Representations and Audiences, book to be edited by Omotayo Banjo. Deadline for abstracts: April 20, 2020.

According to the Pew Research Center, foreign-born immigrants comprise about fourteen percent of the American population. Second-generation Americans (U.S. born children of immigrants) comprise about 12% of the population and is projected to increase to 18% in the next 30 years. As a result, Schildrkraut (2007) argues that multiculturalism is a competing definition of Americanism as it “endorse[s] this notion that America’s unique identity is grounded in its immigrant legacy and in its ability to convert the challenges immigration brings into thriving strengths, pg. 600.” According to the Institute of immigration research report (2015), foreign-born immigrants comprise up to 11% of the entertainment industry with up to six percent representing producers and directors.

Series like Master of None, Jane the Virgin, and films like My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 and Crazy Rich Asians have emerged telling stories which resonate with the intergenerational and intercultural characteristics of American identity. Recently, the Hollywood Reporter initiated a video series hosted by Charlamagne Tha God titled Emerging Hollywood. This interview-platform show captures some new game players in Hollywood who engage American cultural politics from their ancestral perspective and as such offer a more nuanced view of what it is to be American. Entertainers and producers like Hasan Minhaj (Patriot Act), Yvonne Oriji (Jesus and Jollof), Ali Wong (Fresh off the Boat), and Gina Yashere (Bob Hearts Abisola) unashamedly represent their (or their parents’) ancestral land within their home country and engage this hybridity with ingenuity.

Challenging Hollywood’s beliefs that White dominated narratives are universal, these new players demonstrate the story of immigrants and their children both resonates and presents an evolving definition of American identity.

The aim of this anthology is to make room for scholarship which examines how immigrants and their U.S. born children use media to negotiate their American identity and how audiences engage with mediated narratives about the immigrant experience (i.e., cultural adjustments, language use etc).

Submissions may include textual or audience analysis, survey or experimental methods. Texts of interest include film (mainstream and independent), television, web series, original series, books, online magazines, and music which speak to the first and second-generation experience. If possible, the topics should engage to some extent questions of migration, diaspora and media and acculturation. Although the project is under way, newer submissions are welcome to make the volume stronger. Please contact the editor with any questions.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:

  • Deadline for abstracts (approx. 300- 500-words excluding citations): April 20, 2020.
  • Include a cover page with all of the authors’ contact information, key terms, and an abridged c.v. for each author
  • Submit proposals to Omotayo Banjo with “First Gen Media” in the subject line.
  • Invitations to submit full manuscripts will be sent by May 4, 2020
  • If selected, a draft of your chapter submissions must be original works of at least 3000-6000 (estimate) words, references included. Chapter draft deadline: July 24, 2020.

Uygar Doğan Researcher Profile

Researcher Profiles

Uygar Doğan is an Agile Program Lead with Capital One Tech and a language enthusiast. She holds an MBA degree from State University of New York (SUNY) Albany.

Uygar DoganBorn in Turkey, she immigrated to the USA in 1998. She studied English and German as part of her school curriculum in Turkey, and she enjoys translating between the languages of Turkish, German and English. In her current job, she helps software engineers accomplish their goals via Agile methodologies. She currently lives in New York City and appreciates the immense diversity the city has to offer. Her other interests include traveling the world and discovering good Plant Based food wherever she goes. She is happy to be a part of CID’s research community and hopes that through such exchange, the world will learn to become one and appreciate our differences as well as our similarities.