Interfaith Dialogue Through Chocolate

Applied ICDBorn in Morocco, now based in Germany, Nadia Doukali has created Iftarlade chocolate which is both kosher and halal, with a label in Hebrew, Arabic, and German.

Doukali first designed a Ramadan calendar, which she called “Iftarlender,” (made up of the word “Iftar” – the evening meal during Ramadan used to break each day’s fast, and the German word “kalender” for the German advent calendars with small paper doors, and sayings or candy behind them). Then she created Iftarlade chocolate (“Iftar” + “schokolade”, or chocolate in German). She decided to make it halal, and then wanted it to be kosher as well, so she worked to gain the appropriate certifications. She sees her products as a way for people to be “united in chocolate.”

Read more here:

Avidan, Igal. (28 May 2020). Muslim German sets new bar for interfaith relations with kosher-halal chocolate. The Times of Israel.

Loho, Petra. (20 May 2020). Counting down to Eid? In Germany, Nadia Doukali gave the traditional Advent calendar a Muslim twist. Salaam Gateway.

 

CFP Mentoring Interculturally

“PublicationCall for Chapter Proposals: Mentoring Interculturally/Mentoring in Intercultural Contexts. Editors: Ahmet Atay and Diana Trebing. Under contract with Peter Lang. Deadline: June 15, 2020.

Editors are looking for a few additional chapters in mentoring related to different cultural contexts. Mentoring occupies a major role in higher education. We mentor students and fellow faculty members, many of whom come from diverse backgrounds, such as first-generation, LGBTQ, and other countries among others. Perhaps as scholars and educators we do not spend or have enough time thinking about mentoring. It might also not be something that we formally discussed in graduate school. As we find ourselves mentoring various groups of people in higher education, we try to model our own mentors who helped us as students or faculty. Due to lack of formal training, perhaps we might use a trial-error approach or simply find spontaneous ways to mentor.

Continue reading “CFP Mentoring Interculturally”

CFP Discourse & Rhetoric Amid COVID-19

“PublicationCall for papers: Special issue on Discourse and Rhetoric amid COVID 19 Pandemic: Dis/Articulating The ‘New Normal’ for Rhetoric and Communications E-Journal. Deadline: October 1, 2020.

Guest Editors: Andrea Valente and Paola Giorgis

The coronavirus disease (SARS-CoV-2) with its global and local pandemic has been on the top agenda of Government leaders, scientists, health professionals, as well as on the daily headlines across journalistic media. New governmental measures, decrees, scientific recommendations, and sanitary campaigns emerge everyday to combat or alleviate the pandemic which are endorsed and spread through mainstream media. On the one hand, a new discourse and rhetoric has been articulated to create, support, and even impose a ‘new normal’ that reconfigures how human beings communicate, interact, and socialize in public and private spaces. On the other hand, the new normal has triggered responses from skeptics, ‘Covideniers’ and protesters who try to disarticulate it by polarizing and politicizing the coronavirus pandemic.

With this in mind, this Special Edition invites junior and senior scholars to collaborate with articles that explore and analyze the various languages, rhetorical strategies, and discourses used during the Covid19 pandemic in order to either articulate (e.g. construct, endorse, conform) or disarticulate (e.g. contest, deny, undermine) the ‘new normal’. This Special Edition looks forward to collaborations in the field of argumentative theory, critical/discourse analysis, rhetoric, critical sociolinguistics, communication studies, and others alike.

RAI Film Festival (UK)

FellowshipsRoyal Anthropological Institute (RAI) Film Festival, Bristol, UK. Deadline: 15 August 2020.

The RAI Film Festival celebrates documentaries and non-fiction films from around the globe that engage with themes of culture & society. It has a special focus on anthropological and ethnographic films. First held in 1985, and one of the longest-established in its field, the RAI FILM FESTIVAL serves as a leading forum for exploring the multiple relationships between documentary film-making, anthropology, visual culture, and the advocacy of cultural diversity and intercultural dialogue through film.

Calling for short, mid- and feature length documentaries, ethnographic / anthropological films, student films. Open to all.

The 17th RAI Film Festival will take place 25-28 March 2021 in Bristol, UK.

KC35 Media Ecology Translated into Russian

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#35: Media Ecology, which Casey Man Kong Lum wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Milana Petrova has now translated into Russian.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized alphabetically by conceptchronologically by publication date and number, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

 

KC35 Media Ecology_RussianLum, C. M. K. (2020). Media ecology [Russian]. (M. Petrova, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 35. Available from https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2020/05/kc35-media-ecology_russian.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

York St. John U: TESOL/Linguistics (UK)

“JobLecturer, TESOL and Linguistics, School of Education, Language and Psychology, York St. John University, York, UK. Deadline: 15 June 2020.

York St. John University is currently seeking a Lecturer in TESOL and Linguistics to start 1st August 2020. The successful candidate will join a team of fifteen Languages and Linguistics academics based within the School of Education, Language and Psychology. They offer BA and MA programmes in British Sign Language, Deaf Studies, Educational Linguistics, English Language and Linguistics, Intercultural Communication, Japanese, Korean, Language and Social Justice, and TESOL. The successful candidate will contribute to undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in TESOL and Linguistics.

Candidates should have the experience and expertise to teach across a range of linguistics modules such as introductory grammar and phonetics, second language acquisition and multilingualism. It is essential that candidates hold a doctoral level qualification, or are near completion, and are actively engaged in research. Research expertise should be in TESOL, and may also be related to one or more of the following areas: applied linguistics; corpus linguistics; digital communication; discourse analysis; forensic linguistics; language acquisition; psycholinguistics; queer and feminist linguistic theory; sociolinguistics; syntax.

Hong Kong Baptist U: Translation/Intercultural Studies (China)

“Job2 positions for Assistant Professor, Department of Translation, Interpreting and Intercultural Studies, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong, China. Deadline: July 19, 2020.

Preference will be given to those with expertise in at least one of the following clusters: (i) translation theory; (ii) translation technology, translation-related applications of big data, and localization; (iii) interpreting studies; and (iv) intercultural studies, preferably with interests in minority cultures. Given the Chinese/English orientation of the majority of the Department’s course offerings, a command of Chinese is expected.

 

 

Being Korean AND Black

“Book

Kang Hyun-kyung. (May 23, 2020). I am Korean yet culturally black. The Korea Times.

Cindy Wilson, author of Too Much Soul: The Journey of an Asian Southern Belle, was born I Wol-yang in Seoul and adopted by African-American parents in 1975 when she was a few months old. Her name was changed to Cindy and she was brought to America by her adoptive parents the following year. Raised in Mississippi, Wilson identifies as being part of the African American community, even though she is Asian.

Too much soul

The article, and the book that sparked it, seem likely to start interesting class discussions about racial vs. cultural identity. Biracial students, or students adopted across racial lines as in this case, are often particularly skilled at helping other students in a course help learn how to gracefully discuss the issues.

 

Abe: Using Film in ICD

Intercultural PedagogyAbe, a film by Brazilian director Fernando Grostein Andrade, uses fusion foods as a way to approach intercultural dialogue.

Finding one’s identity is a challenge everyone faces, but few have the pressure that 12-year-old Abe feels as the son of an Israeli mother and Palestinian father. Though his parents have raised him in a secular household, both sets of grandparents insist he chooses between being Jewish or Muslim. Abe’s passion for food allows him some escape from the escalating family tensions. While exploring Brooklyn to discover new foods, he meets Chico, a Brazilian chef who believes “mixing flavors can bring people together.”

If you use other films in your work or teaching that relate to intercultural dialogue, please take a moment to send an email with a short note, as CID is currently preparing a list of such films to post as a resource.

Carnegie African Diaspora Fellowship Program

FellowshipsFellowships, Carnegie African Diaspora Fellowship Program. Deadline: June 30, 2020.

The Carnegie African Diaspora Fellowship Program (CADFP) is a scholar fellowship program for educational projects at African higher education institutions. Offered by IIE in collaboration with the United States International University-Africa, the program is funded by a grant from Carnegie Corporation of New York. A total of 471 African Diaspora Fellowships have been awarded for scholars to travel to Africa since the program’s inception in 2013. CADFP exemplifies Carnegie’s enduring commitment to higher education in Africa. IIE manages and administers the program, including applications, project requests and fellowships. USIU-Africa provides strategic direction through the Advisory Council.

Accredited African universities in six host countries (Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, Tanzania and Uganda) can submit a project request to host an African-born scholar currently living in the United States or Canada to work on projects in research collaboration, graduate student teaching/mentoring and curriculum co-development. Or African-born academics currently living in the United States or Canada and working at institutions of higher education can submit a Scholar Application to the Scholar Roster.