Anna Lindh Foundation: Communication Officer (Egypt)

“Job

Communication Officer, Anna Lindh Foundation, Alexandria, Egypt (may start remotely due to the pandemic). Deadline: 15 March 2021.

The Anna Lindh Foundation is seeking to appoint a Communication Officer as a member of its team. They are looking for a dynamic and professional who shares our values and is passionate about scaling – up the impact and reach of intercultural action and voices across the Mediterranean region. The communication officer will support enhancing the Foundations’ media profile in publications and its presence on social media, handle news to the Foundation’s stakeholders, manage the Foundation’s website, support in developing communication and media strategies through different information, communication, visibility activities and tools, such as publications, website, social media, press relations, multimedia, etc. to communicate impact.

Arizona State U: Director of Global Initiatives (USA)

“JobDirector of Global Initiatives, Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona.  Deadline: March 10, 2021.

The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University is conducting an international search for a Director of Global Initiatives to lead the School’s growing international education and outreach initiatives. The Director will be responsible for managing the office of Cronkite Global Initiatives as well as leading the School’s curricular and co-curricular international efforts.

For nearly two decades, Cronkite Global Initiatives has fostered meaningful connections among Cronkite students, staff and faculty and international media professionals, scholars and citizens and worked to advance the practice and teaching of journalism and media communications around the world. The Cronkite School is home to the Hubert H. Humphrey Fellowship program in journalism.

Fulbright Teachers for Global Classrooms (USA)

Fulbrights2021-2022 Fulbright Teachers for Global Classrooms (Fulbright TGC) Program, US Department of State, Washington, DC. Application deadline: March 24, 2021.

The Fulbright Teachers for Global Classrooms Program is a yearlong professional learning opportunity and short-term exchange for elementary, middle, and high school educators from the United States to develop skills to prepare students for a competitive global economy. Fulbright Teachers for Global Classrooms equips educators to bring an international perspective to their schools through targeted training, experience abroad, and global collaboration.

Fulbright Teachers for Global Classrooms participate in a rigorous, semester-long online course focused on best practices in global education; gather for an in-person professional development workshop in Washington, D.C.; and travel abroad for two to three weeks to immerse themselves in another country’s culture and education system. Participants create a global education guide that serves as a resource in their local community to share the skills, experiences, and resources they have developed throughout the program.

Access more than 350 resource guides created by Fulbright TGC alumni in the Global Education Guides Resource Library.

KC16: Migration Translated into Spanish

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#16: Migration, which Saskia Witteborn wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Daniel Mateo Ordóñez has now translated into Spanish.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC16 Migration_Spanish

 

Witteborn, S. (2021). Migración. (Trans. D. M. Ordóñez). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 16. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2021/03/kc16-migration_spanish.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Musicosophia: Listening as a Necessary Part of Intercultural Dialogue

Applied ICDEscuela Internacional de Musicosophia, in Germany, trains people to listen deeply to classical music. They have suggested that their training may well be relevant to intercultural dialogue, and have shared steps and a meditation video with CID.

The 2020 CID Video Competition asked students to focus on listening, as listening is how intercultural dialogue starts. Listening is what happens when people stop focusing on what they say or do, and start attending to what someone else is saying or doing. Without listening, there can be no intercultural dialogue.

Putting these two together suggests that spending a little time learning to listen carefully to classical music might be useful training for engaging in intercultural dialogue. First, read the steps. Then, view the videotape by clicking on the image above. Try it and let us know what you think.

CFP NAMLE: Media Literacy & Social Justice (Online)

ConferencesCall for Proposals, National Association for Media Literacy Education (NAMLE): Media Literacy and Social Justice, Online,  July 16 – 18, 2021. Deadline: March 14, 2021.

CFP NAMLE 2021

Media literacy has many connections with social justice; in fact, many would say that media literacy is social justice. Specifically, media literacy helps us to understand the relationships between media, information, and power; this is often referred to as critical media literacy. The process of developing media literacy skills helps us to decipher what a piece of media wants you to believe and why, who benefits from you believing it, whose perspectives are valued in mainstream media, whose perspectives are marginalized or missing, and how we might elevate them. It helps us to unpack stereotypes and circulate ideas about various groups. Media literacy promotes inquiry into the effects that propaganda and mis/dis-information have on our politics and how they perpetuate injustices against marginalized groups, the environment, and our sociopolitical climate. In sum, media literacy helps us to understand issues of systemic inequity and who benefits from their maintenance, while also inspiring action, critical change, and the democratization of media industries. Given all of these connections, NAMLE finds it extremely salient to organize a conference around the topic of Media Literacy + Social Justice.

Proposals will be given special consideration if they (1) articulate concrete connections to social justice, and (2) offer a fresh point of view of an issue within the field of media literacy education.

CID Poster #14: 10 Ideas

CID Posters

This is a bonus poster, designed by Linda J. de Wit who was the CID intern in 2017, and who has now returned as an occasional graphic design consultant.

This poster illustrates the recommendations of the CID Focus Groups Report for UNESCO’s Futures of Education Initiative to add a 10th idea to their list of 9 ideas, as described in their report, Education in a post-COVID world: Nine ideas for public action.

CID Poster 14: 10 Ideas

In the report, we ask that they consider intercultural dialogue as essential to learning to live together.

Intercultural dialogue permits not merely living together with a wide range of other people but living together with (and despite) our differences, taking empathy, compassion, and respect for all as a given.

Just in case anyone wants to cite this poster, the following would be the recommended format:

Center for Intercultural Dialogue. (2020). Ten ideas. CID Posters, 14. Available from:

As with other series, CID Posters are available for free on the site; just click on the thumbnail to download a printable PDF. This may be downloaded, printed, and shared as is, without changes, without cost, so long as there is acknowledgment of the source.

As with other series, if you wish to contribute an original contribution, please send an email before starting any work to receive approval, to minimize inadvertent duplication, and to learn about technical requirements. As is the case with other CID Publications, posters should be created initially in English. If you want to volunteer to translate a poster into a language in which you are fluent, send in a note before starting, to receive approval.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

U Edinburgh: IASH Fellowships on Decoloniality (UK)

“JobFellowships, Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities (IASH), University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. Deadline: various, mostly April 30, 2021.

IASH is pleased to announce a new three-year project examining a variety of topics centred on decoloniality. The Institute Project on Decoloniality 2021-2024 (IPD ‘24) is now open for applications. The Institute and its partners warmly encourages Fellowship applications from scholars around the world, exploring issues including but not limited to: decolonising gender and sexuality, anticolonial and decolonial theory, race and racialisation, and Scotland’s role in the British Empire. As well as in-person Fellowships, the IASH is happy to accept applications for hybrid / remote-working Fellowships for applicants who are unable to travel to Edinburgh. It is important to note that they still welcome applications on all topics and in all areas of the arts, humanities and social sciences to continue IASH’s traditional interdisciplinary work across disciplines, alongside IPD’24.

U Ghana: MIASA Fellowships (Ghana)

“JobJunior/Senior individual and tandem fellowships, Maria Sibylla Merian Institute for Advanced Studies in Africa (MIASA), University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana. Deadline: March 31, 2021.

The Maria Sibylla Merian Institute for Advanced Studies in Africa (MIASA) offers five Individual Fellowships (Junior/ Senior) for 3-5 months each, and one Tandem Fellowship (Junior/ Senior) for two fellows for 3-5 months each at the University of Ghana for the period between 15 January and 31 July 2022. Individual fellowships will allow researchers to conduct a project of their own choice. These projects can be of an opening, continuing, or closing nature. The successful applicants will become MIASA Fellows with all the corresponding rights and obligations for the agreed fellowship period. The tandem fellowship will allow the researchers who are teaming up to pursue a joint academic project, which can be of an opening, continuing, or closing nature. Two researchers – one from Africa and one from Germany – will work in a collaborative manner on a particular research topic in the Humanities and Social Sciences, addressing in one way or another MIASA’s overarching aims. Their joint application must highlight the additional academic value of their cooperation. The application should also define the objectives and anticipated outcomes of their collaboration. The successful applicants will become MIASA Fellows with all the corresponding rights and obligations for the requested funding period.

Intercultural Competencies Applied to Public Administration (Spain)

Applied ICDGuide on Intercultural competencies applied to the development of public administration projects, Intercultural Cities Programme, Spain.

Guide to intercultural competencies

In response to a grant from the Intercultural Cities Programme, several cities in Spain have successfully concluded a project on developing the intercultural skills of public administration staff as a key element for advancing further in the building of strong intercultural cities and territories. The assumption is that an intercultural competent staff at the service of the public administration will result in better municipal services, increase users’ satisfaction, and contribute to greater trust and sense of belonging.

The project responds to the existing gap in documentation by designing a practical handbook for city officials, transforming the concept of intercultural competence into practical language for local administration officers,  defining the basics of an intercultural competent public action, and training  local administration staff.