Constructing Intercultural Dialogue #8: A Flying Miracle

Constructing ICD #7The next issue of Constructing intercultural Dialogues is now available, A Flying Miracle by Inga Milēviča. As a reminder, the goal of this series is to provide concrete examples of how actual people have managed to organize and hold intercultural dialogues, so that others may be inspired to do the same. As with other CID series, these may be downloaded for free. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF.

Constructing ICD #8Milevica, I. (2017). A flying miracle. Constructing Intercultural Dialogues, 8. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/constructing-icd-8.pdf

If you have a case study you would like to share, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz.


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Key Concept #55: Stereotypes Translated into Russian

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#55: Stereotypes, which Anastacia Kurylo wrote for publication in English in 2015, and which Inga Milēviča has now translated into Russian. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC55 Stereotypes_RussianKurylo, A. (2017). Stereotypes [Russian]. (Inga Milēviča Trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 55. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/kc55-stereotypes_russian.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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CFP Interracial Communication: A Global Phenomenon

Publication OpportunitiesCall for Papers, special issue of Journal of Intercultural Communication Research: Interracial Communication: A Global Phenomenon in Diverse Socio-Political Contexts. Special Issue Editors: Drs. Tina M. Harris, Carolyn Calloway Thomas, and Eddah Mutua

Recent socio-political events, both tragic and triumphant, throughout the world continue to articulate to the world that “race does matter.” From immigration to racial profiling and police brutality, Europe and North America are two of many other countries that are rife with racial tensions that are resulting in civil war and death, in some cases. While government officials and agencies are ignoring, minimizing, or trying to resolve these issues, communication scholars throughout the world are addressing these global issues in their scholarship. In order to contribute to these efforts, my colleagues and I are co-editing a special issue of the Journal of Intercultural Communication Research. We will feature research that addresses interracial communication occurring in a global or international context.

The outcome of the 2016 presidential election in the U. S., as an example, has revealed racial tensions amongst and between different racial groups. The idea of a post-racial country have been dismantled. Much of the contemporary dialogue surrounding the election has generated international discourse regarding racism, sexism, xenophobia, and other forms of systemic oppression. This phenomenon can be best understood through interracial/intercultural communication research, which entails the use of theories and the gathering of data to facilitate societal change. As communication scholar Jennifer Johnson (1992) succinctly explains it, the “centrality of communication [must be understood] as both a critical process in changing a world and a key to understanding the changes occurring in that world” (p. 39). To that end, this special issue will showcase a spectrum of methodologies that are  used to enlighten audiences to the global nature of interracial communication from an international worldview or context. This collection of essays will demonstrate how differences are central to the production of scholarship that has implications for use in a real world context. It is our hope that this body of work also provide schools, organizations, and citizens with the tools necessary for moving theory into practice.

In keeping with the aims of the theme of this special issue, the following is a list of possible topics; however, it is not exhaustive. It is our expectation that each submission will address the global implications of interracial communication.
1. Social construction of interracial communication as a global phenomenon
2. Interracial communication within a multicultural context
3. Pedagogical approach to the internationalization of interracial communication
4. Interracial communication within the context of family
5. Intersectionality and interracial communication
6. Interracial communication and global citizenship
7. Interracial communication and colorism
8. Interracial communication and romantic relationships
9. Interracial communication and queer identity
10. Interracial communication and mass media
11. Critical race theory and interracial communication

Submission Information
Manuscripts must be submitted online via the Manuscript Central website by September 15, 2017 for consideration. All submissions must adhere to the Journal of Intercultural Communication Research style requirements. We are adhering to the blind peer review process; thus, we are requiring all authors to remove all l self-identifying references.  We are requesting that submitting author(s) include the following statement on the title: “For consideration in the special issue on interracial communication.” All inquiries about this very important special issue must be directed to all three editors: Tina M. Harris, Carolyn Calloway-Thomas, and Eddah Mutua.

PHD Studentships & Research Fellow Linköping U (Sweden)

FellowshipsPhD student in Language and Culture within the research project ”Vocal Practices of Coordinating Human Action” in the Department of Culture and Communication (IKK), at the Graduate School of Language and Culture in Europe, Linköping University.

Research fellow in Language and Culture, within the project “Vocal Practices of Coordinating Human Action” for the duration of one year, with possible extension up to 4 years in total, formally based at the Department of Culture and Communication (IKK), Linköping University. The duties of the research fellow include fieldwork (video ethnography), transcription, analysis, and research output towards the goals of the project, with possible participation in PhD supervision.

Starting date 
By agreement (during the fall 2017).

PhD student in Language and Culture focused on the field literature, media and ecology. The position is linked both to the research group Literature, Media History and Information Cultures (LMI) and the research program The Seed Box. A Mistra-Formas Environmental Humanities Collaboratory, and is formally placed at the Department of Culture and Communication (IKK), at the Graduate School of Language and Culture in Europe, Linköping University.

British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowships

FellowshipsThe British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowships are three-year Fellowship awards made to an annual cohort of outstanding Early Career Scholars. The aim is to offer opportunities for outstanding early career researchers to strengthen their experience of research and teaching in a university environment which will develop their curriculum vitae and improve their prospects of obtaining permanent lecturing posts by the end of the Fellowship. The primary emphasis is on completion of a significant piece of publishable research, which will be assisted by full membership of an academic community of established scholars working in similar fields.

[Many universities participate – but this notice in particular, from the Department of English, Linguistics and Cultural Studies, has come to our attention.] The University of Westminster is committed to supporting postdoctoral and early career fellowships. We are keen to consider eligible applications from suitable PhD students and early career researchers of postdoctoral standing, whether or not they have a current affiliation with the University.
All potential applicants for this scheme must first submit an application to the University.
To apply, eligible applicants will need to complete a short proforma describing their research and why they have selected the University of Westminster as their host institution. Please email the proforma to us for selection. Successful candidates will be supported by Westminster through the British Academy Post-Doctoral Fellowship application process.
All applications will be considered on the basis of research excellence: the scholarly importance of the project; your ability to carry out the research successfully; the feasibility of the proposed research programme, especially the proposed methodology and timescale; and your publication record to date. Successful candidates will need to demonstrate in their CV a clear research trajectory and some standing in the field.
All applicants will need to identify a mentor prior to submitting their application. You should discuss your application with your mentor. We will not be able to consider an application submitted without a mentor.
Before writing an application, we recommend that you check the British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship Guidance Notes, FAQs and guidance on how the British Academy reviews and evaluates applications for funding
All applicants must complete the proforma and submit it by email to bidsupport@westminster.ac.uk, along with a CV of no more than four pages, by 23:59 on 19 July 2017. Successful applicants will receive feedback by Friday 11 August 2017.

Key Concept #17: Multilingualism Translated into Chinese

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#17: Multilingualism, which Josep Soler-Carbonell first published in English in 2014, and which Yan Qiu has now translated into Simplified Chinese. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC17 Multilingualism_Chinese-simSoler-Carbonell, J. (2017). Multilingualism [Simplified Chinese]. (Y. Qiu, Trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 17. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/kc17-multilingualism_chinese-sim.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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Yan Qiu Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesYan Qiu is a graduate of the Master of Arts in Intercultural and International Communication program at Royal Roads University in Canada, and is now a teaching assistant at RRU. Her professional experience includes working at a language arts training center, and as a teacher in China, and helping to prepare students applying to Chinese universities. Yan has also worked in television in China, with experience in improvisational oral expression, talent performance, language skill and broadcast phonation techniques in Mandarin; as a result, she is familiar with the operation of the Chinese media industry, and television production. Currently she manages the official Facebook pages for the Canada Youth Robotics Club, and Sager Education in Canada, managing both social media sites and editing videos.

Yan QiuYan’s areas of interest include Communication and Media, Intercultural Communication, Film, Second Language Acquisition, and Applied Linguistics. She has studied media development in ancient China and China today, the management pattern and political trends in the Chinese media industry, as well as Chinese scholarship in communication and media theory today.

Yan has traveled not only in China, Canada, and the United States, but also Cuba, Russia and Korea. Her goal is to promote cultural diversity, cross-cultural understanding and second language acquisition through travel and applied approaches.

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New CID Series: CID Posters

CID PostersAcademics typically write a lot of words, and don’t worry much about how they are displayed, on the assumption that ideas stand on their own merits. One advantage in having a website is the ability to integrate images with words, and thus to change the ways in which words are shown and shared. This is important because research shows that images are shared far more often than just words. In recognition of these facts, CID will shortly be starting a new series, CID Posters, which will highlight a particular quote or concept by showing it visually.

The first set of posters is being created by Linda J. de Wit, as part of her internship with CID. However it will also be possible for others to submit posters, just as the regular publication series have been opened to a wide range of contributors. As with other series, please send an email before starting any work to receive approval, to minimize inadvertent duplication, and to learn about technical requirements.

As with other series, posters will be made available for free on the site. They may be downloaded, printed, and shared as is, without changes, without cost, so long as there is acknowledgment of the source.

Presumably most posters will display and then illustrate a quote or concept either about intercultural dialogue or on a closely related topic, although if anyone has other ideas, feel free to send in a note about what you would like to do.

As is the case with other CID Publications, posters should be created initially in English. Given that translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue have received so many views, anyone who wishes to translate their own poster into another language (or two) is invited to provide that as well. If you want to volunteer to translate someone else’s poster into a language in which you are fluent, send in a note before starting, to receive approval and to confirm no one else is working on the same one.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com

Key Concept #5: Intercultural Communication Translated into Latvian

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#5: Intercultural Communication, which I wrote and first published in English in 2014, and which Inga Milēviča has now translated into Latvian. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC5 ICC_Latvian Leeds-Hurwitz, W. (2017). Starpkultūru komunikācija. (Inga Milēviča Trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 5. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/kc5-icc_latvian.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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U Neuchâtel PHD Candidate Positions: CA/Interactional Linguistics (Switzerland)

FellowshipsThe Centre for Applied Linguistics at the University of Neuchâtel (Switzerland), member of the Competence Centre CRIS (Centre for Research on Social Interaction) is inviting applications for two PhD-candidate positions (= two 50% doctoral assistant positions) in Conversation Analysis / Interactional Linguistics.

Start date: October 1, 2017
Duration: 4 years

The successful candidate should hold an MA degree in Linguistics (or an equivalent degree), be trained in conversation analysis and/or interactional linguistics, and motivated to develop an original PhD thesis project in either one of these fields. He or she should show an interest in contributing to one of the Centre’s main research areas (interactional competence, second language talk, grammar-in-interaction). He or she should have an operational mastery of French (or develop such a mastery
within one year), allowing him or her to interact with students and colleagues and to participate in data sessions where French conversational data is being analyzed.