ACLS Grants: Comparative Perspectives on Chinese Culture and Society

GrantsCFP ACLS Comparative Perspectives on Chinese Culture and Society. Deadline: November 7, 2018.

ACLS invites proposals in the humanities and related social sciences that adopt an explicitly cross-cultural or comparative perspective. Projects may, for example, compare aspects of Chinese history and culture with those of other nations and civilizations, explore the interaction of these nations and civilizations, or engage in cross-cultural research on the relations among the diverse and dynamic populations of China. Proposals should be empirically grounded, theoretically informed, and methodologically explicit.

The program supports collaborative work of three types: Continue reading “ACLS Grants: Comparative Perspectives on Chinese Culture and Society”

Study Abroad: New Zealand/Australia (2019)

Study AbroadStudy Abroad in New Zealand and Australia, Media and Society or Intercultural and International Communication, May 20 – June 13, 2019. Deadline: October 31, 2018.

Open to undergraduate and graduate students, who will experience the cultures first hand through visits to television and movie studios, live performances, guest lectures from professionals, and guided tours of museums, and cultural events.  The program has been offered most summers since 2005 in conjunction with an established International Education Provider having safety and emergency procedures and personnel in place on site.   The program is sponsored by Radford University and taught by Matthew Turner, Professor of Communication.  Students can apply at:    The application deadline is October 31.  Thank you for your help.

CFP IABC: Think Forward 2019 (Canada)

ConferencesThe International Association of Business Communicators (IABC) World Conference: Think Forward, June 9-12, 2019, Vancouver, Canada. Deadline: October 26, 2018.

With the theme Think Forward and an eye toward the latest trends, solutions and ideas, the 2019 IABC World Conference will explore new challenges and opportunities facing the communication profession. Renowned for it’s natural beauty, rich history, diverse cultures and mild climate, Vancouver was selected as the ideal location choice for this year’s event.

KC91: Peace Communication

Key Concepts in ICDThe next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. This is KC#91: Peace Communication, by Yael Warshel. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. Lists organized chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC91 Peace CommunicationWarshel, Y. (2018). Peace communication. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 91. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2018/09/kc91-peace-communication.pdf

NOTE: Yael Warshel also has presented a TEDx talk trying to answer a related question, Do Media Have the Power to Make Peace?  

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Queen’s U Job Ad: Cultural Anthro/Sociolinguistics (Canada)

Job adsAssistant Professor in Cultural Anthropology and/or Sociolinguistics, Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. Deadline: November 5, 2018.

The Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures in the Faculty of Arts and Science at Queen’s University invites applications for a Tenure-track faculty position at the rank of Assistant Professor with specialization in Cultural Anthropology and/or Sociolinguistics. The ideal candidate will have a scholarly interest, expertise and a publication record in the area of language in its social context, for example: ethnography; intercultural communication; language contacts or creole linguistics; Indigenous heritage and language revitalization; language and social justice; language and power; writing systems. We particularly welcome applications from candidates whose research relates to any of the languages offered in the department (Anishinaabemowin, Arabic, German, Hebrew, Inuktitut, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, Mohawk, Portuguese, and Spanish). The successful candidate will contribute to the new Languages, Literatures and Cultures (LLCU) Major and will demonstrate expertise in cultural diversity and inter-cultural sensitivity. The successful candidate will participate in developing and teaching a fourth-year capstone course for the LLCU Major, and is expected to teach one or more existing core courses in the Linguistics program.

U New Mexico Job Ad: Culture & Comm (USA)

Job adsAssistant Professor in Culture and Communication, Department of Communication & Journalism, University of New Mexico, NM. Deadline: November 14, 2018.

The intercultural emphasis at UNM defines culture broadly as pertaining to emergent identities; discursive practices and norms; performative, artistic, and mediated forms; locations of speaking/acting/producing; organizational systems; and institutional structures. Culture is socially constructed and structurally produced and therefore a factor that is influential across all communication contexts. Courses reflect this emphasis, focusing on questions and critiques of “diversity” in and across local, national, and global contexts; identities and subjectivities (i.e., nationality, race, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, class, multivocality, intersectionality, positionality, and agency); and places and spaces (i.e., transnationalism and globalization, migration, borderlands, social activism and change, and sustainability).

Intercultural Communication MOOC

Job adsMOOC (Massive Open Online Course): Intercultural Communication. Starts: October 15, 2018.

Learn to appreciate, adjust to, and work or study in different cultures, with this free online intercultural communication course. This course assumes no prior knowledge and is suitable for pre-university, undergraduate and post-experience students. It does require high school-level English or above, an interest in international issues, and curiosity about, exposure to or experience with other cultures.

Taught by Steve Kulich, Hongling Zhang, and Ruobing Chi, all at the Intercultural Institute of Shanghai International Studies University, China, on the FutureLearn platform (other relevant MOOCs on this platform include Cultures and Identities in Europe or Introduction to Intercultural Studies: Defining the Concept of Culture, offered by the European University Institute and the University of Leeds, respectively).

Lûiz Fêrnando da Silva Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesLûiz Fêrnando da Silva is an experienced Brazilian specialist in TV market and lecturer.  TV market enthusiast with a professional and personal interest in content marketing, brand content, content strategy, windowing, streaming, content for social media, TV market regulation and laws, customer and audience insights, content trends, technologies for production and consumption of content and innovation in general.

Lûiz Fêrnando da Silva

Over the last years, he has worked for Globo TV, the biggest media group in Brazil and taught for Escola Superior de Propaganda (ESPM) e Marketing and Agência Nacional de Cinema, the latter being the main public investor on TV production in Brazil.

At Globo TV, he built experience with TV shows creation, development, production planning and programming for free and pay TV (Globo TV & Globosat), streaming services (GloboPlay & GlobosatPlay) and TV on demand (available through NET and SKY). During the years working as a researcher for Globo TV, he attended a variety of conferences – SXSW, TED, Mipcom, MipTV, L.A. Screenings and Natpe, to look for insights and trends to support creation, development and programming decisions. He became familiar with FremantleMedia Formats, and had the opportunity to visit some company displays at Mipcom and Natpe Miami.

As a researcher, his area of study is the Political Economy of Communication and Cultural Studies, with a specific interest in the investigation of national and international broadcasting systems and the way the Internet (streaming: VOD, SVOD, TVOD) imposes new regulatory and marketing challenges on local, regional, national, continental, and global levels. In addition, he has interests in subjects such as multiculturalism, gender, and race, and how they are being represented through media culture products.

Currently he is conducting a post-doctoral study entitled “Globo and Netflix: unfolding of the coexistence between the services of SVOD in Brazil.” In this investigation the goal is understanding how Netflix causes changes in the country’s two largest broadcasting companies, TV Globo (open TV) and Globosat (cable channel programmer), both owned by Grupo Globo. The research is being conducted at the Center for Communication and Society Studies (CECS), Minho University, in Braga, Portugal.

CFP NAMLE 2019 (USA)

ConferencesCall for Papers: National Association for Media Literacy Education (NAMLE) Conference: A Path Forward: Elevating Conversation, Unifying Voices, June 26-28, 2019, Washington, D.C. Deadline: November 1, 2018.

The National Association for Media Literacy Education is now accepting proposal submissions for the 2019 Conference to be held in Washington D.C. from June 26-28, 2019. The conference theme, “A Path Forward: Elevating Conversation, Unifying Voices” aims to provide a platform for including voices from diverse disciplines as we explore the future of media literacy in a rapidly shifting media landscape. To this end, the conference includes innovative session formats and built-in networking opportunities to facilitate the sharing and discussion of new ideas. Through these collaborative sessions, educators, researchers, and practitioners from diverse fields within and outside of media literacy education can work with other participants of the conference to create innovative tools, practices, and strategies for moving media literacy beyond Fake News.

Translation & Translanguaging Films

Resources in ICD“ width=The 11 short films produced by the Translation and Translanguaging TLANG team provide a teaching and research resource in the areas of multilingualism, superdiversity, and sociolinguistics. They also document engagement approaches with different stakeholders. Those investigating linguistic and social diversity, migration, translation and translanguaging, may find them particularly useful. TLANG was a major research project active 2014-18; its aim was to understand how people communicate across diverse languages and cultures.

  1. Voices of the Bullring Markets : This video provides an introduction to the superdiverse nature of the Bullring meat and fish markets in Birmingham.

  2. The Library of Birmingham : This video provides an account of language and interaction at the Library of Birmingham.

  3. Communication in the Multilingual City: This film of the final TLANG conference contains discussions about translanguaging and offers a range of interpretations.

  4. Translanguaging and the Arts: A Creative Conversation:  This film explores researchers, artist and creative practitioners working together to represent multilingualism and superdiversity in new and engaging ways.

  5. Overcoming Barriers to University Education in South Africa: Highlights from workshops held in South Africa to engage university lecturers and managers in discussions about translanguaging as pedagogy in higher education in South Africa, and the role of South Africa’s official languages in university classrooms.

  6. Researching Translanguaging Summer School: Scholars from all over the world attended this summer school which explored different conceptualisations of translanguaging and methodological approaches for researching linguistic diversity.

  7. Women & Theatre: The TLANG team collaborated with a creative company, ‘Women and Theatre’, who produced an original piece of theatre in response to their engagement with the research project. The show was performed 22 times in four cities, to enthusiastic and appreciative audiences.

  8. A Network Assembly I:  This captures how a range of different stakeholders including policy makers, councillors, museum curators, local business people, artists, academics and students engage with concepts such as superdiversity, translanguaging and multilingualism.

  9. Changing Lives: This film shows the work of a Chinese community Centre and provides an account of how the lives of people visiting the centre are changing.

  10. Team Work in the City:  This film shows the coaching practices of a volleyball coach communicating with volleyball players from different countries around the world.

  11. Crossing Borders: Translanguaging as Social Practice.This short film captures our partnership with a range of stakeholders including artists, policy makers, academics and community activists around the themes of language, superdiversity, sport and law.