1 Minute Intervention to Reduce Prejudice Through Logic

Applied ICD

Berger, Michele W. (October 7, 2019). A simple intervention enduringly reduces anti-Muslim sentiment. Penn Today.

“Research from the Annenberg School for Communication found that calling out the hypocrisy of collective blame—holding an entire group that’s not our own responsible for acts of a single person—significantly lessened hostile sentiments toward that group…Emile Bruneau, who runs the Peace and Conflict Neuroscience Lab at the University of Pennsylvania, wanted to understand why collective blame—holding an entire population responsible for the acts of a single person belonging to that group—happens and how challenging it might be to change. He and colleagues from Northwestern University and the University of Granada found that by using a simple, one-minute intervention, they could reduce anti-Muslim sentiment on the spot. What’s more, the effect held when tested again a month, and a year later.

“For the experimental group, participants went through what the researchers dubbed a “Collective Blame Hypocrisy” intervention at the initial encounter. First, participants read three descriptions of violence committed by white Europeans like Anders Breivik, a right-wing extremist who went on a shooting rampage, killing 77 people in Norway in 2011. After each example, participants rated how responsible they felt white Europeans were as a group, and how responsible they personally were, for those attacks.

“Next, they read a description of the 2015 Islamic State–led violence in Paris, accompanied by the biography of a Muslim woman named Fatima Wahid who owned a bakery there. How responsible were Fatima and others like her, participants were asked, for the violence they’d just read about? “The Spaniards who went through the simple exercise replied with a 10 on the 100-point scale,” Bruneau says. “That’s a fourfold difference from the control group.” Responses to questions about participants’ anti-Muslim sentiments (which included those assessing support for allowing Muslim refugees into Spain and for anti-Muslim policies such as closing down mosques in Spain) also improved for those who did the intervention.

“That difference in perception remained steady even a year out—the finding Bruneau says he is most excited by. “A one-minute, logical activity shook the collective blame of Muslims enough that anti-Muslim sentiments were less than the control group a full year later,” he says.

Original publication citation:
Bruneau, E., Kteily, N. S., & Urbiola, A. (2019). A collective blame hypocrisy intervention enduringly reduces hostility towards Muslims. Nature Human Behavior.

Atsushi Katayama Researcher Profile

Researcher Profiles

Atsushi Katayama is a PhD candidate in Communication Studies at Tokyo Keizai University in Japan.

Atsushi Katayama

He earned his MA in Media Studies from New York University. He has been working in the advertising industry as a creative director and copywriter for about thirty years. Throughout his experience in both  the professional and academic fields, he has been fascinated by the concept of “narrative” and the ways in which it works as a communication system in advertising.

Effective Student Dialogue

Intercultural Pedagogy

Jamison, I. (2016, November 16). Effective student dialogue: Critical thinking and active listening.

This is a webinar presented by Dr. Ian Jamison, Head of Education at Generation Global. The moderators are Scott Chua, a first year student at Yale-NUS College Singapore, and Hailey Lister, a first year student at Occidental College in Los Angeles, CA. It’s made available on edWeb.net, a network serving the global education community. The event is long over, but the webinar is still accessible. The topic suggests that it may be useful as a pedagogical tool in teaching about intercultural dialogue, given that listening is one component of dialogue.

CFP IADA 2020: Toward Culture(s) of Dialogue? (Poland)

ConferencesCall for papers: Towards Culture(s) of Dialogue? Communicating Unity in/and Diversity through Language and Discourse, 22-25 September 2020, Warsaw, Poland. Deadline: 29 February 2020.

Institute of Applied Linguistics, University of Warsaw, and the International Association for Dialogue Analysis (IADA) jointly invite submissions to the international conference on dialogue: “Towards Culture(s) of Dialogue? Communicating Unity in/and Diversity through Language and Discourse,” to be held in Warsaw, Poland, 22-25 September 2020.

Intercultural exchange and integration that are now observed in many regions of the world contribute to an ongoing merger of different fields of socio-political life. The aspirations for tighter and maturer trans-national/trans-regional cooperation, fostered by the focus on pluralistic and democratic procedures, are often paralleled with sustained or growing cultural divisions. They are manifest in various discourse-mediated acts of segregation, marginalization and exclusion. Despite the efforts at orderliness, lawfulness and partnership in the public realm, the latter frequently becomes an arena of communicative chaos, misunderstanding, violence and aggression. In the light of the growing cultural and interactive dissonance in different parts of the world, questions arise as to the role of linguistics, dialogue studies, discourse analysis as well as other related humanities in confronting the various forms of communicative antagonism that penetrates both public and private domains.

The aim of this conference is to approach the observed dynamics in global intercultural communication by tracing discourse strategies of modern institutions. Are there any alternatives to oppressive styles and exclusionary rhetoric, as well as to polarised and confrontational stances emerging from them in public and private spheres? Can the ‘closed’ interactive positions be transformed into substantial, efficient and constructive dialogue? How can the ‘unity’-oriented discourse activities compromise, dismiss or accommodate expressive ‘diversity’ in the interaction game? The above problems pose questions as to speakers’ critical language awareness, communicative competence and responsibility in selecting, rejecting, modifying and creating local and global discourse practices. Reflective choices and modelling of these strategies may be constitutive of ‘culture(s) of dialogue’.

Organizers invite linguists, discourse analysts,  sociologists, psychologists, political and media scientists, law experts, philosophers, anthropologists, culture mediators (translators, teachers, etc.), as well as other researchers from related disciplines to the multidisciplinary discussion of prospects and limits of mediating human culture(s) through dialogue.

KC24 Asiacentricity Translated into Japanese

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#24: Asiacentricity, which Yoshitaka Miike wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which he has now translated into Japanese.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized alphabetically by concept, chronologically by publication date and number, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC24 Asiacentricity_Japanese

Miike, Y. (2019). Asiacentricity [Japanese]. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 24. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2019/10/kc24-asiacentricity_japanese-2.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

St Louis U: New Media/Popular Culture (Spain)

“Job

Faculty in Communication Studies, Saint Louis University-Madrid Campus, Madrid, Spain. Deadline: December 15, 2019.

Saint Louis University is seeking applicants for a full-time (12-month renewable) faculty position in Communication Studies at the campus in Madrid, Spain. The successful candidate will hold a Ph.D. in Communication Studies specialized in new media, popular culture, and audience research. We seek a qualitative researcher trained in ethnographic methods. Candidates must have experience working with an international student population embedded within a culturally diverse educational environment. The candidate should have teaching experience in undergraduate education, and preferably be acquainted with the U.S. educational system of higher education. Teaching responsibilities include core courses such as Public Speaking, New Media & Society, Communication Theory, and upper-level courses such as Popular Culture and Digital Storytelling. In addition to these courses, the candidate should be able to expand our Communication curriculum with courses grounded in his or her area of expertise, including an advanced qualitative research methods course.

(NOTE: There is also a part-time position in Anthropology – follow the same link to see the description.)

IREX: Program Coordinators, Fulbright Exchanges (USA)

“Job

Program Coordinators, Fulbright Teacher Exchange Programs, IREX, Washington, DC. Deadline: none listed.

IREX has a position posted for Program Coordinators (PC) to support their Education practice in providing administrative support to the Fulbright Teacher Exchange Programs in the day-to-day administration of program activities including logistics, implementation of  initiatives, financial monitoring, and communicating with partner organizations. The PC supports events and management, reporting internally and externally.

NOTE: This position description has no date for when it was posted, or when it expires. If it is already filled, there are many other positions available at IREX, not only in the USA but internationally. IREX started as the International Research Exchange, about 50 years ago. Their current organizational description says: “IREX is a global development and education organization. We focus on people, not on vaccines, roads, or wells. We work in more than 100 countries on issues such as education, leadership, information, and youth.”

Renmin U: Postdoctoral Fellowships in Journalism/Communication (China)

PostdocsPostdoctoral Fellowships, School of Journalism and Communication, Renmin University of China, Beijing. China. Deadline: 13 December 2019.

The School of Journalism and Communication at Renmin University of China was founded in 1955. Since then, it has developed into a nationally-acclaimed institution of academic research, professional training and education reform in journalism and communication. The school’s Journalism and Communication discipline is ranked as the first-class key discipline by the Ministry of Education. It has a national experimental teaching demonstration center, and a Ministry of Education key research base of humanities and social sciences, the Journalism and Social Development Research Center. The journalism and communication program has been persistently ranked as Top 1 in previous rounds of national disciplinary assessment organized by the Ministry of Education. It has been enrolled into the Chinese “Double First Class” discipline plan in 2017. In order to advance the “Double First Class” discipline development, facilitate the future faculty recruitment and enhance academic research, the school is currently accepting applications all over the world for multiple postdoctoral positions.

UNESCO: Assoc Programme Specialist: Communication & Information (France)

“Job

Associate Programme Specialist, Communication and Information, UNESCO, Paris, France. Deadline: 8 December 2019.

Under the overall authority of the Assistant Director-General for Communication and Information (ADG/CI) and the direct supervision of the Chief, Executive Office (CI/EO), the incumbent is responsible for providing professional and technical support, research and analysis for the programme management, as well as coordination of the Communication and Information (CI) Sector. Working as part of the global CI team and as member of the Executive Office, the incumbent will assist the Chief, CI/EO in performing the major activities listed below.

To assist Chief, CI/EO in overall coordination activities of the Executive Office, the incumbent will:

  • collect and analyze data, prepare and consolidate briefings in the thematic areas of media  and information literacy, media development, universal access to information and documentary heritage;
  • provide support to Chief CI/EO in facilitating joint action and good working relations between colleagues in the Field and Headquarters, UNESCO Centers, Institutes and networks, Central services, as well as partnerships with Member States, Intergovernmental Organizations, civil society, academia and the private sector;
  • manage and produce correspondence, memos, briefings, speeches, articles, web content, inputs to the UNESCO annual report, etc.

Xenophobil: Solution to Xenophobia

Applied ICDThe Exelixis Institute, an NGO working with youth in Greece, and the Embassy of Norway in Greece joined together to create and distribute a pseudo-drug, Xenophobil, as part of a creative public campaign against xenophobia and racism starting in 2013. Packages are still being distributed in 2019, most recently at the the European Day of Languages celebration held at the Norwegian Embassy in Greece.

NOTE: The video is in Greek, because this is a Greek project.

The main focus of the campaign is to defend the right to diversity and the value of peaceful coexistence. Xenophobil, a “drug” that relieves the symptoms of xenophobia and treats patients with a satirical recipe which makes everybody smile while reading the leaflet and tasting the sweet chewing gum, has been distributed by the thousands.

Excerpt from the pamphlet in the box:

“Xenophobic Symptoms”:

       * Patients consider civilizations and cultures as fixed entities that cannot be changed evaluating their own culture as the most important of the scale and underestimating the other cultures.

       *  Patients translate the term “immigrant” into the term “outsider”.

        *  Patients’ behavior toward the others depends on the predefined characteristics, due to his/hers religion, culture or mentality.

        *  Patients have the tendency  to idealize their own image.