CFP Theorizing Communication from the South

Publication OpportunitiesCall for Papers, Special Issue of Communication Theory: Theorizing Communication from the SouthGuest Editors: Mohan J. Dutta, National U of Singapore, and Mahuya Pal, U of South Florida.

In this special issue, we take forward emerging calls for decolonizing communication to explore communication theories anchored in the cartographies of the Global South. We encourage submissions that question assumptions regarding internationalization, de-Westernization, and globalization, along with other key concepts, and that consider new directions for approaches to theorizing communication. Submissions should engage with questions concerning the production of knowledge, the role of communication in global relations, and the potential for communication to contribute to advancing imaginaries of the Global South.

The special issue will offer opportunities for theory construction that challenge the Eurocentric bases of communication theories, taking seriously scholars from and in the Global South. In doing so, we hope to foster new grounds for debate, conversation, and practice relevant to communication scholarship. While our emphasis is precisely on theorizing communicative imaginations from the South, scholars situated in the Global North engaged with the practical politics of centering theories from the Global South are also welcome.

The deadline for submission of full papers is 1 December 2017.

See submission guidelines, and submit. For queries regarding the Special Issue’s theme, please contact Mohan Dutta (cnmmohan AT nus.edu.sg) and Mahuya Pal (mpal AT usf.edu).

KC53: Conflict Management Translated into Igbo

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#53:Conflict Management, which Qi Wang wrote in English in 2015, and which Kingsley Oluchi Ugwuanyi has now translated into Igbo. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC53 Conflict Management_IgboWang, Q. (2017). Conflict management [Igbo]. (K. O. Ugwuanyi, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 53. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/10/kc53-conflict-management_igbo.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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Kingsley Oluchi Ugwuanyi Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesKingsley Oluchi Ugwuanyi was born in Nsukka, Southeastern Nigeria, the host town of the University of Nigeria where he completed my BA in English and literary studies and MA in TESL. He has been teaching and researching at the same university since 2010 (currently on study leave). In 2016, Northumbria University awarded him a studentship to undertake doctoral research in sociolinguistics. Please visit his University of Nigeria staff profile and Northumbria University student profile for additional information.

Kingsley Oluchi UGWUANYI

Publications:

Ugwuanyi, K. O., Chukwu, M. O., & Eze, H. O. (2016). The tragic order and the threat of comedy in Achebe’s Arrow of GodOkike: African Journal of New Writing, 55, 23-35.

Ugwuanyi, K. O., & Chukwu, M. O. (2016). Interrogating the teaching and learning of English in Nigeria: Still in search of an enabling principle. Turkish Online Journal of English Language Teaching (TOJELT), 1(2), 75-84.

Ugwuanyi, K. O., Ekeh, S. O. (2015). Shifting the borders: Genre-crossing in Modern African DramaResearch Innovator: International Multidisciplinary Research Journal, 2(5), 1-17.

Chukwu, M., Oguanuo, I., & Ugwuanyi, K. O. (2014). Poor literacy in the English language: Beyond the teacher and his classroom, inside the mass media. Literacy and Reading in Nigeria: A Journal of the Reading Association of Nigeria, 15(2), 261-266.

Conference paper

Ugwuanyi, K.O. (2017). ‘English as a native second language’: The problem of taxonomy and identity in Nigerian English. Presented at the 22nd International Conference of the International Association for World Englishes (IAWE), 30 June – 2 July 2017 at Syracuse University, New York.

KC85: Diglossia by Marianna Kyriakou

Key Concepts in ICDThe next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. This is KC#85: Diglossia, by Marianna Kyriakou. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. Lists organized chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC85 DiglossiaKyriakou, M. (2017). Diglossia. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 85. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/10/kc85-diglossia.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


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CFP IAICS 2018 Communication & Dialogue: Integrating Global Communities

ConferencesThe International Association of Intercultural Communication Studies (IAICS) is now accepting submissions for the 24th international conference, to be held at DePaul University in Chicago, IL, USA, July 5-8, 2018. The deadline for submissions is November 1, 2017.

Conference Theme: Communication and Dialogue: Integrating Global Communities

There are two opposing perspectives that have resulted from today’s globalized world: One that promotes diversity, interconnectedness, and interdependence through open borders and intercultural collaboration as the antidote to the global problems of inequality, terrorism, and climate change. But not all subscribe to this notion, as another, more harmful view is characterized by ethnocentrism, prejudice, xenophobia, and implicit biases, which cause fear, exclusion, alienation, divisiveness, and violence. As intercultural communication scholars, it is our ethical responsibility to identify, analyze, and provide strategies and solutions to these problems and to create inclusive and integrated global communities through engaging intercultural and international dialogues. Integration of communities requires humanity to come together through compassion, empathy, shared values, common interests, and full participation of all people while acknowledging and respecting cultural differences. By sharing research from diverse interdisciplinary perspectives on intercultural and international issues, we can generate new ideas, new ways of thinking, and collective wisdom toward a brighter future.

Study Abroad: London & Iceland 2018 (Radford U)

Study AbroadStudy Abroad in London and Iceland for Communication students (undergraduate or graduate) interested in studying Media and Society or Intercultural and International Communication in London and Iceland during summer 2018.  This is a three-week program (Approximately May 14 through June 6) where students experience the cultures first hand through visits to television and movie studios, live performances, guest lectures from professionals, and guided tours of museums, and historical venues.

The program is sponsored by Radford University and taught by Matthew Turner, Associate Professor of Communication.  The application deadline is October 31.

U Maryland Baltimore County Job: Intercultural Communication

Job adsTenure-Track Assistant/Associate Professor of Intercultural Communication, University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Application deadline: October 31, 2017.

The Department of Modern Languages, Linguistics, and Intercultural Communication at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) is filling a tenure-track position at the rank of Assistant or Associate Professor in intercultural communication. Candidates will be expected to have a comprehensive research agenda in intercultural communication. They should have in hand a PhD in intercultural communication or a closely related field, experience in intercultural training, and native or near-native proficiency in at least one of the following languages: Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Russian or Spanish. The department has been a pioneer in incorporating intercultural communication into its language pedagogy, enriching both the fields of language pedagogy and intercultural communication. Teaching responsibilities will include courses in intercultural training, other areas of critical intercultural communication, and courses in the selected candidate’s language area at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The candidate will also participate in the supervision of theses and scholarly papers in the department’s interdisciplinary MA program in Intercultural Communication. We welcome applications from applied linguistics, intercultural education, cross-cultural psychology, critical intercultural communication, and other fields that engage with intercultural modern language studies. Employment is contingent upon the candidate’s obtaining and maintaining appropriate visa status, if applicable. For more information about the MLLI department and the INCC program, please consult
http://mlli.umbc.edu.

UMBC has a strong commitment to increasing faculty diversity. We are especially proud of the diversity of our student body and we seek to attract equally diverse faculty. Successful candidates must be able to work in a multicultural environment and support diversity and inclusion reflecting our student body. Furthermore, the successful candidate should embrace our vision and mission, and be committed to inclusive excellence and diversity. Please include in your application letter a statement addressing your commitment to and experience in fostering inclusive excellence. Members of minority groups, women, veterans and individuals with disabilities are strongly encouraged to apply.

In your letter of application, please address your vision for the history, theories, debates, and methodologies of the field as they apply to your agenda for research, teaching, training, service, and outreach.”

KC12 Third Culture Kids Translated into Greek

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#12: Third Culture Kids, which Anastasia Aldelina Lijadi wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Rania Spiridakou has now translated into Greek. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC12 TCK_GreekLijadi, A. A. (2017). Third Culture Kids [Greek]. (R. Spiridakou, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 12. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/10/kc12-tck_greek.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

CFP Belt & Road Initiative & Intercultural Communication

Publication OpportunitiesThis special section of China Media Research invites scholars to submit manuscripts on the theme of “The Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) and Intercultural Communication.” As explained by the Chinese government, this initiative aims to foster economic connectivity and promote the common development of all countries. From the perspective of intercultural communication, the main appeal of the initiative is a new kind of multilateralism and globalization. Accordingly, many related questions deserve our attention: What are the differences between this version of globalization and the past/current one dominated by the West? What are the philosophical and cultural thoughts behind the BRI? What are the Chinese government and businesses doing regarding the BRI? How does the world interpret and respond to the BRI?

We invite scholars to submit original theoretical and empirical research to address the above questions, for the purpose of theory building and contribution to intercultural understanding and practices.

Continue reading “CFP Belt & Road Initiative & Intercultural Communication”

KC80: Cultural Discourse Analysis Translated into Simplified Chinese

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#80: Cultural Discourse Analysis, which Sunny Lie wrote for publication in English in 2017, and which Yan Sun has now translated into Simplified Chinese. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC80 Cultural Discourse Analysis_Chinese-simLie, S. (2017). Cultural discourse analysis [Chinese]. (Y. Sun, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 80. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/10/kc80-cultural-discourse-analysis_chinese-sim.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.