UNESCO: Chief of Inclusion, Rights & Dialogue (France)

“Job

Chief of Inclusion, Rights and Dialogue Section, Social and Human Sciences Sector,  UNESCO,  Paris, France. Deadline: 25 July 2021.

The Inclusion, Rights, and Dialogue Section of UNESCO supports Member States to promote inclusive policies and actions, by countering racism and discrimination, advancing intercultural dialogue and pursuing gender equality.

Under the supervision of the Assistant Director-General for the Social and Human Sciences Sector (ADG/SHS), the incumbent will be responsible for a number of flagship programs and projects, such as: UNESCO’s Roadmap on Anti-racism and non-discrimination; intercultural dialogue and competencies; arts for human rights and social justice; the promotion of gender equality and the fight against gender stereotypes; the international coalition of inclusive and sustainable cities; the Slave Route Project; the right to science and scientific freedom. The successful candidate will lead the design, coordination, execution and evaluation of the program and projects for the Inclusion, Rights and Dialogue Section.

UNESCO: COVID and Intercultural Dialogue

“UNESCO”

UNESCO. (2020). The socio-cultural impact of COVID-19: Exploring the role of intercultural dialogue in emerging responses. Paris, France: UNESCO.

This report published by UNESCO argues that intercultural dialogue (ICD) is a substantial part of how the world responds to global challenges such as the pandemic.

[T]he emerging post COVID-19 world will be shaped by new dynamics and complex realities immersed in virtual inter-connectivity and driven by cross-sectoral engagements. To this end, the ICD agenda will have a significant role to play in developing a new socio-cultural compact that will contribute to shaping the way we live, work, connect and engage across national, ethnic and civilizational lines. (p. 15)

In addition to agreeing with the general sentiment, I was delighted to read the friendly comments about the report I prepared for UNESCO 8 years ago:

In its influential 2013 report ‘Intercultural Competencies: conceptual and operational framework‘ UNESCO approaches intercultural dialogue (ICD) as assuming ‘that participants agree to listen to and understand multiple perspectives, including even those held by groups or individuals with whom they disagree’. (p. 2)

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

 

KC1 Intercultural Dialogue Translated into French

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#1: Intercultural Dialogue, which I wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Mohammed Guamguami has now translated into French.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

 

KC1 Intercultural Dialogue_FrenchLeeds-Hurwitz, W. (2021). Le dialogue interculturel. (M. Guamguami, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 1. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2021/05/kc1-intercultural-dialogue_french.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Call for Exercises on ICD Topics

 

Intercultural PedagogyCID would like to make available on this site a collection of exercises on topics related to intercultural dialogue, and designed to help people learn to engage in intercultural dialogues. 

Intercultural Dialogue definition

As a reminder, intercultural dialogue has been defined on this site as “the art and science of understanding the Other” (courtesy of Peter Praxmarer, as explained here). 

The goal is to first gather a number of such exercises and, second, make them available to all those who follow this site. This request may be interpreted broadly, both in terms of content (so that intercultural competence, conflict resolution, conflict management, negotiation, peacekeeping, etc. would all be appropriate foci), and in terms of type of exercise (not only discussion but also writing, video, interview, graphic design, etc. could all be relevant examples). 

Please send examples, and/or questions, to Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, via email.

Wikipedia Entry for Intercultural Dialogue

Resources in ICD“ width=Daniel Mateo Ordóñez recently pointed out that Wikipedia did not yet have an article on intercultural dialogue, so I wrote one. That entry is now published.

 

If there are topics related to the concept that you would like to see included, send an email, or post a comment below.

As a reminder, CID does have its own Wikipedia entry, created several years ago, with the help of Minh Cao. Similarly, if there are additional topics you would like to see included on that entry, let me know.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

Intercultural/Interracial Dialogue at Home

Resources in ICD“ width=Intercultural connections of all kinds (race, ethnicity, nationality, religion) happen at two levels – in public, and in private. Most research focuses on the former, but there is much to be gained by studying the latter. People who have intercultural friends have to discuss and face their differences, and find a way to manage them, and this is even more true for intercultural couples and families, who often are making a longer term commitment to an Other. There is a growing literature addressing the topic.

A few relevant sources follow.

Breger, R., & Hill, R. (Eds.). (1998). Cross-cultural marriage: Identity and choice. Oxford, UK: Berg.

Bystydzienski, J. (2011). Intercultural couples: Crossing boundaries, negotiating difference. New York NY: New York University Press.

Dervin, F. (2013). Do intercultural couples “see culture everywhere”? Case studies from couples who share a lingua franca in Finland and Hong Kong. Civilisations, 62, 1–15.

Gonçalves, K. (2013). Conversations of intercultural couples. Berlin, Germany: Akademie Verlag.

Inman, A. G., Altman, A., Kaduvettoor‐Davidson, A. N. J. U., Carr, A., & Walker, J. A. (2011). Cultural intersections: A qualitative inquiry into the experience of Asian Indian–White interracial couples. Family Process, 50(2), 248-266.

Johnson, E. D. (2020). Say I’m dead: A family memoir of race, secrets and love. Chicago, IL: Lawrence Hill Books.

Karris, T., & Killian, K. (Eds.). (2009). Intercultural couples: Exploring diversity in intimate relationships. London, UK: Routledge.

Lee, Pei-Wen. (2006). Bridging cultures: Understanding the construction of relational identity in intercultural friendship. Journal of Intercultural Communication Research, 35(1), 3-22.

Leeds-Hurwitz, W. (2002). Wedding as text: Communicating cultural identities through ritual. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Leeds-Hurwitz, W. (Ed.). (2005). From generation to generation: Maintaining cultural identity over time. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press.

Martinez, L. V., Ting-Toomey, S., & Dorjee, T. (2016). Identity management and relational culture in interfaith marital communication in a United States context: A qualitative study. Journal of Intercultural Communication Research, 45(6), 503-525.

McFadden, J. (2001). Intercultural marriage and family: Beyond the racial divide. The Family Journal, 9(1), 39-42.

Moscato, G., Novara, C., Hombrados-Mendieta, I., Romano, F., & Lavanco, G. (2014). Cultural identification, perceived discrimination and sense of community as predictors of life satisfac- tion among foreign partners of intercultural families in Italy and Spain: A transnational study. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 40, 22–33.

Piller, I. (2002). Bilingual couples talk: The discursive construction of hybridity. Amsterdam, Netherlands: John Benjamins.

Piller, I. (2007). Cross-cultural communication in intimate relationships. In H. Kotthoff & H. Spencer-Oatey (Eds.), Handbook of intercultural communication (pp. 341–359). Berlin, Germany: Mouton de Gruyter.

Romano, D. (2008). Intercultural marriage: Promises and pitfalls. Nicholas Brealey.

Sandel, T. L. (2015). Brides on sale: Taiwanese cross border marriages in a globalizing Asia. New York: Peter Lang.

Tili, T. R., & Barker, G. G. (2015). Communication in intercultural marriages: Managing cultural differences and conflicts. Southern Communication Journal, 80(3), 189-210.

Wilczek‐Watson, M. (2017). Intercultural intimate relationships. In Y. Y. Kim (Ed.), The international encyclopedia of intercultural communication. New York: Wiley. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118783665.ieicc0058

See also Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue #1 on Intercultural Dialogue, #96 on Interreligious Dialogue, #12 on Third Culture Kids and #94 on Cross-Cultural Kids.

 

ICD Resource Center, Anna Lindh Foundation

Resources in ICD“ width=Intercultural Dialogue Resource Centre, Anna Lindh Foundation, Alexandria, Egypt.

The Anna Lindh Foundation has launched the Intercultural Dialogue Resource Centre in order to make research, good practices, learning activities, expertise and events on intercultural dialogue in the Euro-Mediterranean accessible to everyone. The Centre contains information on more than 100 curated academic publications and the biographies and contact information for 100 experts. It also offers visitors a selection of journalistic articles, events, learning activities developed especially for civil society and around 30 good practices presenting successful projects addressing a variety of issues relating to intercultural encounters, trends and affairs in the Euro-Mediterranean region.

Created in 2005, the Anna Lindh Foundation is an inter-governmental institution established by the countries of the Euro-Mediterranean partnership and the European Union in the framework of the Barcelona Process as the central institution for intercultural dialogue among the peoples of the region.

CID Video Competition FAQ 2020

Job adsIn past CID Video Competitions, a number of questions have been asked. In hopes this will help others, they are posted here, along with answers. As new questions are asked, they will be added and answered. 

Please read the basic information for the CID Video Competition in 2020, including especially the entry rules, carefully! If submissions do not meet the requirements, they cannot be considered for a prize until and unless they are revised. When ready, submit your video

But…coronavirus!
At this point the competition is still on, despite the pandemic. Some instructors have suggested this can be a particularly useful assignment for courses suddenly moved online. So go ahead and make your videos!

This year’s topic is listening. What does that entail?
Listening means paying attention to someone else rather than focusing on your own words and ideas. This is easiest with someone you know well, and hardest with a stranger, especially if that person shares few characteristics with you. But listening is the start of intercultural dialogue, so it’s important. For more details, see this list of additional Resources.

What exactly is intercultural dialogue, anyway?
The short answer: Intercultural dialogue requires at least two people from different cultural groups (so, it can be international, interracial, interethnic, or interfaith). It is active (people actually communicating in some way, having dialogue) rather than passive (knowledge in people’s heads). Here’s a longer answer: Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 1: Intercultural Dialogue. For more details, see this list of additional Resources.

What about intergenerational dialogue, is that intercultural as well?
NO, intergenerational dialogue within a single culture is not usually considered a form of intercultural dialogue. An argument could presumably be made, but that may be difficult given the short time limit for the video.

Can a group of students submit a video instead of one person?
Yes, absolutely. In fact, that is encouraged, as the perfect way to demonstrate listening to different points of view.

How many people maximum in a group are allowed?
Whatever works best for the students – and the instructor in a particular course if the competition is being used as a class assignment – will be fine. We’ve never set a limit.

Can faculty members participate?
NO, this is a competition for students only. Faculty members can serve as informal advisers or critics, and are certainly asked to encourage participation, or even require participation as part of a course if that suits their needs. But faculty members should NOT be part of the group that actually works on the video, and should NOT be the one submitting a video.

Can audiotapes be submitted in lieu of videotapes?
NO, sorry, audiotapes are NOT videotapes.

Where should videos be uploaded?
Upload videos here. You will have to create an account when you get to the site, with your email, name, and a password. Videos should NOT be uploaded directly to YouTube or any other server, please!

Help, I don’t understand the directions when I get to the upload site!
You are asked to “Login or create an account.” The first time there, you need to choose “Create an account,” which requires providing your email address, first name, last name, and making up a password which you provide twice to confirm. Then click on “Register.” At that point you need to answer the questions on the application. If you don’t finish the first time, when you go back to the site, choose “Login” and then finish. Your email is your “Login ID” and the password is the same one you provided when you created the account.

My students are having difficulty submitting their videos. Can a faculty member help with this step?
YES, absolutely. The goal is to have student-created videos. There’s no problem with a faculty member helping to get those videos uploaded so they can be entered in the competition. However, please do NOT do it for them – the account should not be in the faculty member’s name. Let the student create an account, and then help as needed with any technical or translations issues.

My student says it’s hard to upload a video so I’m sending it to you to upload for them.
NO, sorry, we can’t do that! Get in touch via email and ask for help, but really, the system is pretty straightforward.

My students created videos for this competition as a course assignment, so there are several different videos to be uploaded. Does each video need to be submitted separately?
YES, absolutely. Each video, whether created by one student or by a group of students, should be uploaded separately so it can be evaluated by the judges.

Four of us worked on a video together. Do we submit it once or 4 times?
ONLY ONCE! A group video should be submitted once, with all students who worked on the video being listed as creators. Choose a student who checks their email fairly often as the one to upload the video, so if there are any questions, they will see the email and be able to respond.

Can 30-minute videos be considered?
What part of “no less than 30 seconds, no more than 2 minutes” is unclear?

Is there a language requirement for the videos?
YES, the videos either must be in English or subtitled in English. Permitting other languages would imply having judges who know all the several dozen languages currently represented on the site, which would be impossible. However, choosing to have most of the video silent, with few words, or using another language with English subtitles, are appropriate ways to finesse the language requirement for those who are not native speakers.

Do the videos have to be live action?
NO, animation has been successfully incorporated into several submissions in the past. However, a PowerPoint slideshow is unlikely to result in an award, as that doesn’t make a very successful video.

I want to use video I made of a group singing a song in live performance. I have their permission, but not that of the copyright holder for that song. Is that fair use?
Unfortunately, the short answer is no, you would need permission of the copyright holder of the song. The long answer is that for all fair use questions, see the Documentary Filmmakers Statement of Best Practices in Fair Use and the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Online Video; these and other such best-practices codes are available from the Center for Media and Social Impact.

CID VIdeo Competition Resources 2020

Job adsThe following resources discussing listening and intercultural dialogue are intended to help to those preparing entries for the CID Video Competition in 2020.

This year’s competition has the theme “listening is how intercultural dialogue starts.” This means students need to demonstrate their understanding of 2 concepts. The first is Listening. Materials published on the CID site that should be useful include:

Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue
#37: Dialogic listening

Constructing Intercultural Dialogues
#6: The privilege of listening first

As well as several posts related to listening:
LIST(e)N and The Day of Listening
Call for Papers: International Listening Association
Call for Papers: Special issue of International Journal of Listening on Listening in mediated contexts

The second part is Intercultural Dialogue. CID has produced a number of overlapping explanations, including:

Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue
#1:    Intercultural dialogue
#8:   Public dialogue
#10: Cross-cultural dialogue
#14: Dialogue
#81: Dialogue as a space of relationship
#84: Double intercultural dialogue

Constructing Intercultural Dialogues
#9: Intercultural dialogue as an activity of daily living
#11: Creating connection through intercultural dialogue partners

CID Posters
#3: Intercultural dialogue
#6: Dialogue defined
#8: Intercultural competence/intercultural dialogue

If you have further questions, see previously published competition rules, and FAQ. See the reflection by one winning team on creating their video. Or send an email with a question. When you’re ready to submit an entry, click here [URL to be added when the competition opens].

KC1 Intercultural Dialogue Translated into Spanish

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#1: Intercultural Dialogue, which I wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Milton Machuca-Galvez has now translated into Spanish.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC1 Intercultural Dialogue_Spanish

Leeds-Hurwitz, W. (2020). Diálogo Intercultural. (M. Machuca-Galvez, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 1. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/kc1-intercultural-dialogue_spanish.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.