KC1 Intercultural Dialogue Translated into Romanian

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting  KC1: Intercultural Dialogue, which I wrote and first published in English in 2014, and which Gabriel Furmuzachi has now translated into Romanian. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC1 ICD RomanianLeeds-Hurwitz, W.  (2017). Dialogul Intercultural (G. Furmuzachi, Trans.). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 1. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/kc1-intercultural-dialogue_romanian.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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Key Concept #1: Intercultural Dialogue Translated into Chinese

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#1: Intercultural Dialogue, which I wrote and first published in English in 2014, and which Yan Qiu has now translated into Simplified Chinese. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC1 ICD_Chinese-simLeeds-Hurwitz, W. (2017). Intercultural dialogue [Simplified Chinese]. (Y. Qiu, Trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 1. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/kc1-icd_chinese-sim.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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Key Concept #1: Intercultural Dialogue Translated into Italian

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting the translation of KC1: Intercultural Dialogue. I wrote this in English for publication in 2014, and Maria Flora Mangano has now translated it into Italian with the help of Paola Giorgis. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC1 ICD_ItalianMangano, M. F. (2017). Dialogo interculturale (M. F. Mangano with P. Giorgis, trans.). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 1. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/kc1-intercultural-dialogue_italian.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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Constructing Intercultural Dialogues #5: Intercultural Dialogue and Deaf HIV/AIDS

Constructing ICD #7Following the recent announcement of a new series to be published by the Center for Intercultural Dialogue, the fifth issue of Constructing intercultural Dialogues is now available. The goal is to provide concrete examples of how actual people have managed to organize and hold intercultural dialogues, so that others may be inspired to do the same. As with the continuing CID series, Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, these may be downloaded for free. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF.

CICD 5 MonaghanMonaghan, L. (2017). Intercultural dialogue and Deaf HIV/AIDS. Constructing Intercultural Dialogues, 5. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/04/constructing-icd-5.pdf

If you have a case study you would like to share, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz.


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MOOC: Media & Information Literacy & Intercultural Dialogue

UNESCO and Athabasca University jointly offer a MOOC on Media and Information Literacy and Intercultural Dialogue (MILID), in partnership with the International Media and Information Literacy and Intercultural Dialogue University Network.

In the evolving knowledge societies of today, some people are overloaded with information; others are starved for information. Everywhere, people are yearning to express themselves freely and to participate actively in governance processes and cultural exchange. Universally, there is a deep thirst to understand the complex world around us.

Media and Information Literacy and Intercultural Dialogue (MILID) is a basis for enhancing access to information and knowledge, freedom of expression, gender equality, and a high standard of education in an intercultural framework. It describes skills and attitudes that are needed to understand the functions of media and other information providers in society across a variety of media formats, including those of the Internet. It encourages the value of accepting and sharing diverse cultural and religious standpoints. The course does these things in order to enable people to share knowledge and experience, learn from one another and find, evaluate, and produce information and media content on their own. In other words, MILID covers the competencies that are vital for people to engage effectively in all aspects of development.

More and more countries recognize the importance of MILID. Over 70 countries are implementing MILID-related activities in varying degrees and reach. Yet, this takes time. At present, only a handful of states have put in place national MILID-related policies and elaborated the strategies that are needed to sustain their efforts. Meanwhile, research has shown that countries with national MILID policies and strategies have more far-reaching and sustained programmes.

This open access course in MILID, which has been designed, written and offered as a partnership between UNESCO and Athabasca University, introduces the concepts of media and information literacy and intercultural dialogue along with important issues that relate to this new set of competencies for global citizenship.

The course is open to anyone who wishes to sign in. There are 10 units addressing such concepts as media and information literacy, intercultural dialogue, freedom of expression, the multiple roles of media and advertising in contemporary life, gender representation and stereotyping in the media, challenges and opportunities for youth, and ways of engaging with new technologies for social change. If you wish to receive a certificate for taking this course, you need to achieve a grade of at least 65% overall.

Key Concept #1: Intercultural Dialogue Translated into German

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting  KC1: Intercultural dialogue, which I published in English in 2014 as the first in the series, and which Dominic Busch has now translated into German. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC1 Interkultureller dialog_GermanLeeds-Hurwitz, W. (2016). Interkultureller dialog. (D. Busch, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 1. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2016/09/kc1-icd_german.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue[at]gmail.com


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Key Concept #1: Intercultural Dialogue Translated into Persian

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting  KC#1: Intercultural dialogue, which I published in English in 2014 as the first in the series, and which Ramin Hajian Fard has now translated into Persian. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC1 Intercultural Dialogue_PersianLeeds-Hurwitz, W. (2016). Intercultural dialogue [Persian]. (R. H. Fard, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 1. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2016/10/kc1-intercultural-dialogue_persian-rev1.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue[at]gmail.com


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concept #1 Intercultural Dialogue Translated into Arabic

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting the translation of KC1: Intercultural Dialogue, which I wrote in English to start the series 2 years ago, now translated into Arabic by Fahd Alalwi, of the Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University, in Saudi Arabia. Click on the thumbnail of the translation to read it. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC1 ICD_Arabic

Leeds-Hurwitz, W. (2016). Intercultural dialogue [Arabic]. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 1.  (F. Alalwi, Trans.). Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2016/07/kc1-icd-arabic.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue[at]gmail.com


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concept #1: Intercultural Dialogue Translated into Turkish

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting the translation of KC1: Intercultural Dialogue, which I wrote in English to start the series 2 years ago, now translated into Turkish by Kenan Çetinkaya. Click on the thumbnail of the translation to read it. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC1 ICD TurkishLeeds-Hurwitz, W. (2016). Kültürlerarası diyalog. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 1 (K. Çetinkaya, Trans.). Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2016/07/kc1-icd-turkish.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue[at]gmail.com


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Quote of the Day: Culture, Sustainability, Intercultural Dialogue

Occasionally when I read, a quote related to intercultural dialogue strikes me as particularly noteworthy for being insightful, concise, beautifully written, and/or original. One example is provided below. If you have quotes you would like to see posted, submit them for consideration to intercult.dialogue@[at]gmail.com

“Participation in cultural activities fosters young people to be more imaginative and innovative: the processes of creation and cultural participation provide knowledge and techniques to imagine and expand horizons, integrate diverse elements, and create something new. Cultural experiences can be important platforms for the development of capacities that expand self-knowledge, self-expression, self-determination, and life satisfaction and well-being.”

“Educational systems at all levels should include the acquisition of cultural skills and knowledge pertaining to intercultural dialogue; the recognition and valuing of diversity, creativity, tangible and intangible heritage; and the development of skills using digital tools for cultural transmission, innovative expression, and bridging of cultures.” (p. 30)

Duxbury, N., Hosagrahar, J., & Pascual, J. (2016). Why must culture be at the heart of sustainable urban development? Barcelona, Spain: United Cities and Local Governments.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue