UNESCO Survey on ICD

Applied ICDA new report, entitled the UNESCO Survey on Intercultural Dialogue 2017, presents the findings of groundbreaking survey developed by the UNESCO Sector for Social and Human Sciences and the UNESCO Institute for Statistics. This was the first UNESCO survey on intercultural dialogue conducted among its Member States. It was designed to take stock of the current conceptual understanding, policies, and legislation, as well as available data, resources and main stakeholders in this field.

The results provide unique perspective on country-specific policies on intercultural dialogue. They also offer a point of analysis for monitoring and policymaking purposes. The survey was sent to all 199 National Commissions for UNESCO in six official languages.

Key findings include:

  1. Defining intercultural dialogue: Context is crucial to defining and applying intercultural dialogue.

  2. Policy framework: The majority of respondents (71%) state that an intercultural dialogue policy is in place in their country, while only 38% of respondents confirmed the existence of a definition of intercultural dialogue at national level.

  3. Challenges: Past and present conflicts and violence represent significant and complex challenges to bringing different people together in dialogue.

  4. Enabling factors: An environment based on respect, tolerance and acceptance is essential to enable intercultural dialogue to thrive.

What Does Intercultural Dialogue Look Like? CID Video Competition

CID Video CompetitionREMINDER: This contest is coming up quickly, so tell your students and/or peers! Open to all students, undergraduate or graduate, anywhere in the world. First entries possible April 15, 2018; deadline May 31, 2018.

CID has organized its first ever video competition, open to students enrolled in any college or university during the 2017-2018 academic year.

CID Video Competition

To enter, participants must submit a video no longer than 2 minutes that highlights the importance of intercultural dialogue, responding to the question: “What does intercultural dialogue look like?”

Entries will be accepted April 15-May 31, 2018.

One winner will receive a $200 prize. The top entries will be posted to the CID YouTube channel, and be highlighted on the CID website, along with posts describing the creators and highlighting each of their videos, throughout the rest of 2018.

Submissions will be evaluated based on originality, clarity, cultural message, effective use of technology, and overall impact. Feel free to work independently or in groups. Get creative, show off your skills and, most importantly, have fun!

Video Competition FAQ

To submit an entry, click here.

Competition Rules

Continue reading “What Does Intercultural Dialogue Look Like? CID Video Competition”

CID Video Competition: What does Intercultural Dialogue Look Like?

CID Video CompetitionCID has organized its first ever video competition, open to students enrolled in any college or university during the 2017-2018 academic year.

WARNING: Please read the entry rules carefully! Several submissions have not met the requirements, and cannot be considered for a prize until they are revised. Make sure you submit a video file (not audio), that is between 30 seconds and 2 minutes (not 30 minutes!), with the last line “Intercultural dialogue looks like…” and upload it to the server provided (not to YouTube directly). Final deadline is May 31, 2018, at midnight (east coast US time).

NEW Clarification: When someone asks “Intercultural dialogue looks like…” in English, the “…” (read out loud as dot-dot-dot) means your job is to complete the sentence and include your answer as the last shot in the video. (So, “intercultural dialogue looks like a tiger, an ice cream cone, a braid, etc.” – choose whatever image makes sense given your video.) Please do NOT include the literal phrase “Intercultural dialogue looks like…” as the last shot in your video!

CID Video Competition

To enter, participants must submit a video no longer than 2 minutes that highlights the importance of intercultural dialogue, responding to the question: “What does intercultural dialogue look like?”

Entries will be accepted April 15-May 31, 2018.

One winner will receive a $200 prize. The top entries will be posted to the CID YouTube channel, and be highlighted on the CID website, along with posts describing the creators and highlighting each of their videos, throughout the rest of 2018.

Submissions will be evaluated based on originality, clarity, cultural message, effective use of technology, and overall impact. Feel free to work independently or in groups. Get creative, show off your skills and, most importantly, have fun!

To submit an entry, click here.

Video Competition FAQ

Competition Rules

Continue reading “CID Video Competition: What does Intercultural Dialogue Look Like?”

KC1 Intercultural Dialogue Translated into Greek

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#1: Intercultural Dialogue, which I wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Margarita Kefalaki has now translated into Greek. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC1 ICD_GreekLeeds-Hurwitz, W. (2017). Intercultural dialogue [Greek]. (M. Kefalaki, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 1. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/08/kc1-icd_greek.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

CID Poster #8: Intercultural Competence/Intercultural Dialogue

CID PostersThis is the next of the posters designed by Linda J. de Wit, in her role as CID intern. The quote is intended to clarify the concept of intercultural dialogue by showing how it relates to an older, more frequently used concept, intercultural competence. The photo of water used as background is Linda’s own. The citation for the quote is:

Leeds-Hurwitz, W. (2016). De la possession des compétences interculturelles au dialogue interculturel: Un cadre conceptuel [Moving from having intercultural competencies to constructing intercultural dialogues: A conceptual framework]. Les Politiques Sociales, 3/4, 7-22.

Intercultural competence/ Intercultural dialogueJust in case anyone wants to cite this poster, the following would be the recommended format:

Center for Intercultural Dialogue. (2017). Intercultural competence/Intercultural dialogue. CID Posters, 8. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/08/competence-dialogue.png

 

As with other series, if you wish to contribute an original contribution, please send an email before starting any work to receive approval, to minimize inadvertent duplication, and to learn about technical requirements. As is the case with other CID Publications, posters should be created initially in English. Given that translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue have received so many views, anyone who wishes to translate their own poster into another language (or two) is invited to provide that as well. If you want to volunteer to translate someone else’s poster into a language in which you are fluent, send in a note before starting, to receive approval and to confirm no one else is working on the same one.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

CID Poster #3: Intercultural Dialogue

CID PostersThis is the third of the posters designed by Linda J. de Wit, in her role as CID intern. The quote by Peter Praxmarer does not come from a publication, but from a Skype conversation we had on April 25, 2017. I was struck by what he said, and how nicely it summed up the concept of intercultural dialogue, and requested permission to turn the definition into a poster, and he graciously agreed. In terms of visual design, Linda indicated “art” by the picture frame, and “science” by the design in the background. Hopefully this definition will find a wide audience, because I think it does a better and more concise job of explaining intercultural dialogue than other definitions I’ve seen.

Intercultural Dialogue definition

Just in case anyone wants to cite this poster, the following would be the recommended format:

Center for Intercultural Dialogue. (2017). Intercultural Dialogue. CID Posters, 3. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/07/art-and-science.png

As with other series, if you wish to contribute an original contribution, please send an email before starting any work to receive approval, to minimize inadvertent duplication, and to learn about technical requirements. As is the case with other CID Publications, posters should be created initially in English. Given that translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue have received so many views, anyone who wishes to translate their own poster into another language (or two) is invited to provide that as well. If you want to volunteer to translate someone else’s poster into a language in which you are fluent, send in a note before starting, to receive approval and to confirm no one else is working on the same one.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

CID Poster #1: Intercultural Communication/Competence/Dialogue

CID PostersThis is the first of the posters designed by Linda J. de Wit, in her role as CID intern. This one provides a quick and easy way to understand, and differentiate between, the concepts of “intercultural communication,” “intercultural competence,” and “intercultural dialogue,” using a rooster and a sheep to represent members of different cultures (and she notes that the animals are vector designs by vecteezy.com). The article where these explanations of these concepts (as well as lots of other concepts) were published is:

Leeds-Hurwitz, W. (2016). De la possession des compétences interculturelles au dialogue interculturel: Un cadre conceptuel [Moving from having intercultural competencies to constructing intercultural dialogues: A conceptual framework]. Les Politiques Sociales, 3/4, 7-22.

Intercultural communication/competence/dialogue

Just in case anyone wants to cite this poster, the following would be the recommended format:

Center for Intercultural Dialogue. (2017). Intercultural communication, intercultural competence, intercultural dialogue. CID Posters, 1. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.org/2017/06/28/cid-poster-1/

Now that the first poster is available as a model, the series is open to submissions. If you wish to contribute an original design, please send an email before starting any work to receive approval, to minimize inadvertent duplication, and to learn about technical requirements. As is the case with other CID Publications, posters should be created initially in English. Given that translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue have received so many views, where specific quotes are provided, anyone who wishes to translate their own poster into another language (or two) is invited to design that as well. If you want to volunteer to translate someone else’s poster into a language in which you are fluent, send in a note before starting, to receive approval and to confirm no one else is working on the same one.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

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Key Concept #1: Intercultural Dialogue Translated into Chinese

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#1: Intercultural Dialogue, which I wrote and first published in English in 2014, and which Yan Qiu has now translated into Simplified Chinese. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC1 ICD_Chinese-simLeeds-Hurwitz, W. (2017). Intercultural dialogue [Simplified Chinese]. (Y. Qiu, Trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 1. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/kc1-icd_chinese-sim.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Constructing Intercultural Dialogues #5: Intercultural Dialogue and Deaf HIV/AIDS

Constructing ICD #7Following the recent announcement of a new series to be published by the Center for Intercultural Dialogue, the fifth issue of Constructing intercultural Dialogues is now available. The goal is to provide concrete examples of how actual people have managed to organize and hold intercultural dialogues, so that others may be inspired to do the same. As with the continuing CID series, Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, these may be downloaded for free. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF.

CICD 5 MonaghanMonaghan, L. (2017). Intercultural dialogue and Deaf HIV/AIDS. Constructing Intercultural Dialogues, 5. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/04/constructing-icd-5.pdf

If you have a case study you would like to share, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz.


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MOOC: Media & Information Literacy & Intercultural Dialogue

UNESCO and Athabasca University jointly offer a MOOC on Media and Information Literacy and Intercultural Dialogue (MILID), in partnership with the International Media and Information Literacy and Intercultural Dialogue University Network.

In the evolving knowledge societies of today, some people are overloaded with information; others are starved for information. Everywhere, people are yearning to express themselves freely and to participate actively in governance processes and cultural exchange. Universally, there is a deep thirst to understand the complex world around us.

Media and Information Literacy and Intercultural Dialogue (MILID) is a basis for enhancing access to information and knowledge, freedom of expression, gender equality, and a high standard of education in an intercultural framework. It describes skills and attitudes that are needed to understand the functions of media and other information providers in society across a variety of media formats, including those of the Internet. It encourages the value of accepting and sharing diverse cultural and religious standpoints. The course does these things in order to enable people to share knowledge and experience, learn from one another and find, evaluate, and produce information and media content on their own. In other words, MILID covers the competencies that are vital for people to engage effectively in all aspects of development.

More and more countries recognize the importance of MILID. Over 70 countries are implementing MILID-related activities in varying degrees and reach. Yet, this takes time. At present, only a handful of states have put in place national MILID-related policies and elaborated the strategies that are needed to sustain their efforts. Meanwhile, research has shown that countries with national MILID policies and strategies have more far-reaching and sustained programmes.

This open access course in MILID, which has been designed, written and offered as a partnership between UNESCO and Athabasca University, introduces the concepts of media and information literacy and intercultural dialogue along with important issues that relate to this new set of competencies for global citizenship.

The course is open to anyone who wishes to sign in. There are 10 units addressing such concepts as media and information literacy, intercultural dialogue, freedom of expression, the multiple roles of media and advertising in contemporary life, gender representation and stereotyping in the media, challenges and opportunities for youth, and ways of engaging with new technologies for social change. If you wish to receive a certificate for taking this course, you need to achieve a grade of at least 65% overall.