Reflection on Making a Video for CID’s Competition

Job ads“The Making of…”: A Path between Cultures by Bruno Alicata and Giorgia Culotta.

In the following contribution we wish to present ‘The Making of’ the video of Class 5B which won the Second Prize in the 2018 CID international video competition “What Does Intercultural Dialogue Look Like?” We believe it is important to share such experience because making the video became the occasion for a meta-reflection on what ‘intercultural dialogue’ means to us and, at the same time, the occasion to actually practice several forms of intercultural dialogue. Therefore, besides the final result – which came unexpectedly, and made us greatly rejoice! – we wish to show how a collective and co-constructed endeavor can be the occasion to realize intercultural practices in their widest and most profound sense. – Paola Giorgis, Teacher, the School of Arts “Aldo Passoni,” Turin, Italy

[If you want to participate this year, check out 2019 CID Video Competition details]

Bruno Alicata: “The meeting of two personalities is like the contact of two chemical substances: if there is any reaction, both are transformed.” (Carl Gustav Jung, 2005 [1933], p. 49) Taking my cue from Jung, I must say that this experience was transformative, I believe for each person who took part in our work. As one of the most important reasons why we chose to take part in this competition was to experience an inner transformation by meeting other personalities from other cultures, I can say that, at the end of all this, this objective was fulfilled.

I will start by illustrating the basic structure of our project. The two main structural metaphors that best define our work are a tree and a Russian doll: the first could be applied to the theoretical and organizational part of the project, while the second applies to the practical part. The former began with our personal reflection, which later expanded to the rest of the participants; while the practical elements of the project started with a task completed by all the group involved, and ended with specific tasks completed by a single person.

The work involved during this journey proceeded step by step, starting with our personal reflections and ideas regarding intercultural dialogue; from this, we presented the project to our schoolmates, explaining the guidelines of the project and how we intended to realize it, and a substantial group of students agreed to join us along this journey. The communication worked well because we truly believed in what we were going to do: this was clear to the people we talked to, who then decided to take part in the project.

As Jacque Fresco said: “The shape and solutions of the future rely totally on the collective effort of people working together. We are all an integral part of the web of life” (2007, p. 11) In this “web of life,” we chose to follow the thread of the web which led everyone to the most efficient and satisfying performance. This was made possible both through group tasks/actions (such as writing the script, deciding how and what to film, deciding what to say and do during the shooting, etc.) and personal tasks (such as recording, editing, painting, organizing the set, etc.). From my perspective, the most rewarding task was the group writing, because we talked a lot, we talked in depth, and most importantly, we talked with our hearts, which resulted in a clear and real expression of ourselves via the script.

The entire project started with this idea: would it be possible to each express ourselves and our culture using only a single word or phrase? We chose to accept this challenge and dive deeply into it. The most challenging part was bringing this idea into the scene, but with the right expression, the right tone of voice, and the right gestures, we managed to pull out something that satisfied us.

I would like to conclude with a final quote by Oscar Wilde: “The aim of life is self-development. To realize one’s nature perfectly – that is what each of us is here for” (1908, p. 28). This experience left me with a deep and profound admiration for other cultures and a new point of view of my own. Because, as already expressed better by Jung, the most beautiful and important part of meeting the others is, as in a chemical reaction, the transformation of both substances in the process. Through this experience, I developed myself, and for this reason I will always be grateful to this project. Regarding all that I learned from it, I wish to encourage everyone to meet new people, and try to learn something from these encounters, because this is what makes life and society so special and wonderful.

Giorgia Culotta: Our project started with a few students, then spread to a crowd, involving many people, from those who worked backstage to the ones who spoke in the video. It was group work in which everyone was welcomed and essential. Both of these aspects are linked to the idea of ‘intercultural dialogue’ which was the focus of our reflection: to us, ‘intercultural dialogue’ implied an exchange, an intertwining of several points of view, often different from each other.

Thus, everyone was welcomed because the concept of intercultural dialogue could be embodied thanks to all the opinions of the participants, so that the more they participated, the better; and everyone was essential, because the concept itself necessarily presupposes the interaction of more than one person. That, in my opinion, was the most important and interesting part of the work: I think that this kind of experience, from the opening discussion to the realization of the video, is very precious, since it has the power of opening people’s minds. In fact it allowed us to meet new people and to listen to their points of view about the theme developed. In such a way, we could learn to understand and to accept others’ ideas and relate to them. This is something we often forget to do, as Newton said: “Men build too many walls and not enough bridges” (attributed to Newton by Georges Pire, 1958).

During this project, my role was basically related to casting. I organized the entrance of the participants, and I wrote down their names, what they wanted to say, and what it meant. Therefore, thanks to my role, I had the chance to talk to all the schoolmates who participated in this project, to meet them, and to get acquainted with their mother tongues or with the language they chose to use. I also had the occasion to bump into all the all the different ideas everyone had, which is definitely far more fascinating than to know about just theoretically.

On balance, I’m quite satisfied with our work and how this path ended; I think it enriched all of us. The only thing I think would have been nice to add was to visually show, through the use of colors, how all of those words, those thoughts, those languages, those cultures have connections among them. That is, to visually show the “intercultural web.”

These were the voices of two former students who contributed to creating the video. To conclude, I wish to add a brief note about its final scene. After the end credits, we can see a student, Elia, who, in Russian (his mother tongue) asks “How are you?” We believe that in this final question lies the answer to the question of the Call, “What does intercultural dialogue look like?” as ‘intercultural dialogue’ is first and foremost an interaction showing mutual interest, curiosity, and care. – Paola Giorgis

References
Fresco, J. (2007). Designing the future. Venus, FL: Venus Project.
Jung, C. G. (2005 [1933]). Modern man in search of a soul. London: Routledge.
Pire, G. (December 11, 1958). Brotherly love: Foundation of peace. Nobel lecture.
Wilde, O. (1908). The picture of Dorian Gray. Leipzig: Bernhard Tauchnitz.

CID Video Competition Resources

Job adsThe following resources discussing intercultural dialogue as a concept may be of help to those preparing entries for the Center for Intercultural Dialogue Video Competition.

Reminder: the question to answer in 2019 is: How do social media influence intercultural dialogue?

Any of the winning videos from the 2018 CID Video Competition should be helpful in providing models of what last year’s judges deemed the most worthy entries. Remember that those participants were answering a different question (What does intercultural dialogue look like?).

CID issues a number of publications that are designed to expand understanding of intercultural dialogue. A few that may be of particular help to newcomers to the topic are these:

Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue
#1:    Intercultural dialogue
#8:   Public dialogue
#10: Cross-cultural dialogue
#14: Dialogue
#81: Dialogue as a Space of Relationship
#84: Double Intercultural Dialogue

CID Posters
#3: Intercultural dialogue
#6: Dialogue defined
#8: Intercultural competence/intercultural dialogue

(See the general FAQs for the competition if you have questions about form rather than content. If you have a question that isn’t answered, send an email.)

CID VIdeo Competition FAQ 2019

Job adsAs people are learning of the CID Video Competition, they have been asking questions. In hopes this will help others, the questions will be posted, along with answers. As further questions are asked, they will be answered here.

Please read the entry rules carefully! If submissions do not meet the requirements, they cannot be considered for a prize until and unless they are revised. 

Can a group of students submit a video instead of one person?
Yes, absolutely. In fact, that is encouraged, as a way to ensure different points of view.

Can faculty members participate?
No, this is a competition for students only. Faculty members can serve as informal advisers or critics, and are certainly able to encourage participation, or even require participation as a course requirement. But faculty members should NOT be part of the group that actually works on the video, and should NOT be the one submitting a video.

Can audiotapes be submitted in lieu of videotapes?
No, sorry, audiotapes are NOT videotapes.

Where should videos be uploaded?
A URL will be provided on the CID website on or before May 1, the first day videos will be accepted. Videos should NOT be uploaded directly to YouTube or any other server.

Can 30-minute videos be considered?
What part of “no less than 30 seconds, no more than 2 minutes long” is unclear?

Is there a language requirement for the videos?
YES, the videos must be in English or subtitled in English. Permitting other languages would imply having judges who know all the several dozen languages currently represented on the site, which would be impossible. However, choosing to have most of the video silent, with minimal talking, or using subtitles, are appropriate ways to finesse the language requirement for those who primarily use other languages.

Do the videos have to be live action?
NO, animation was successfully incorporated in several of last year’s submissions. However, a PowerPoint is unlikely to result in an award.

Do all forms of social media have to be addressed?
NO, at least one, but as many as you like.

What exactly is intercultural dialogue, anyway?
Here’s the short answer: Intercultural Dialogue. For a longer answer, a list of additional resources will be posted shortly to this site.

What about intergenerational dialogue, is that intercultural as well?
NO, intergenerational dialogue is not usually considered a form of intercultural dialogue. An argument could presumably be made, but that may be difficult given the short time limit for the video.

CID Video Competition: How do Social Media Influence Intercultural Dialogue?

Job adsThe Center for Intercultural Dialogue announces its second annual video competition, open to students enrolled in any college or university during spring 2019. Final deadline is May 31, 2019, at midnight (east coast US time).

CID Video Competition 2019

What is intercultural dialogue (ICD)? It is “the art and science of understanding the Other.” ICD can include international, interracial, interethnic, and interfaith interactions, but it is always active (“a matter of what someone does”) rather than passive (“a matter of what someone knows”). Typically, people assume that ICD requires face-to-face interaction. This competition asks: “How do social media influence intercultural dialogue?” Entries must be between 30 seconds to 2 minutes in length and will be accepted May 1-31, 2019 at the URL to be posted below by May 1.  Longer videos will be disqualified.

Faculty members are invited to discuss intercultural dialogue in a class, perhaps showing winning entries from 2018, and to suggest students produce videos as their responses. Students are encouraged to be creative, show off their knowledge and skills, and have fun with this topic

The top award winner will receive a $200 prize. All award-winning entries will be posted to the CID YouTube channel, and highlighted on the CID website, LinkedIn group, Facebook group, and Twitter feed, through posts describing the creators and highlighting each of their videos. Perhaps most important to student learning, all entries will be sent comments from the judges. Winning entries last year came from not only the USA, but also Italy, the UK, and Peru.

See our FAQ. or contact Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, CID Director, with any questions.

Eligibility: All part-time or full time undergraduate or graduate students (post-graduates for those outside the USA) currently enrolled at any university or college or community/ technical college/school, anywhere in the world are eligible. If high school students wish to join in, they are welcome as well. Entries may be created by one individual student, or by a group of students. Given the topic, incorporating more than one viewpoint may be particularly appropriate. Similarly, ensuring that at least someone in the group knows something about the idea of intercultural dialogue, and at least someone has created a video before, should be useful.

Competition Rules:

  1. Submissions will be evaluated based on originality, clarity, understanding of intercultural dialogue, effective use of technology, and overall impact.

  2. Students can work independently or in groups.

  3. Videos should be created by students, not edited and corrected ahead of time by their instructors. Students must submit videos themselves.

  4. In addition to a video, each entry must be accompanied by a completed brief information form about the creator(s). This will be used as a resource in contacting winners, and then in sharing information about them on the CID website and other social media at the end of the competition.

  5. By submitting your entry, you are attesting that you have the necessary authorization to use the images, audio, text, music, and any other content contained in your video. Please do not enter if you are in violation of, or uncertain of your rights to, any copyrights, patents, trademarks, video, music or other intellectual property. Consult your faculty advisor if you have any questions or doubts about the content of your entry. Applicants will be held fully liable under the law for any copyright or other intellectual property violations.

  6. Submissions found incomprehensible, inappropriate, or in violation of intellectual property rights for any reason in the sole judgment of CID will not be accepted into the competition.

  7. Entries will be accepted from May 1-31, 2019. CID is not responsible for any entry that is misdirected, corrupted, or not received by such date. Judging will occur in June, and winners will be announced in July.

  8. Funding for the first prize cash award is provided by the Broadcast Education Association (BEA), one of the members of CID’s parent organization, the Council of Communication Associations.

CID Video Competition 2018 Results

CID Video CompetitionCID’s first video competition is now over, and the judges have reviewed all the videos. As a reminder, the instructions were to answer the question “What does intercultural dialogue look like?” in 90-120 seconds, on video. Separate posts have appeared over the past weeks describing each of the videos and their makers, but here is a single list with links to all of them.

The winners were:
1st prize: Jinsuk Kim, MA student, Temple University, USA
2nd prize: Class 5B,  School of Arts “Aldo Passoni,” Turin, Italy
3rd prize: Sahiti Bonam, BA student, Temple University, USA

In addition, there are three Awards of Excellence:
Victoria Wasner, PHD student, Durham University, UK
Mónica Estrella Oliva,Gabriela Quevedo Rabanal and Renato Morales Camacho, BA students, University of Lima, Peru
Coyote Creative Practicum, BA students, University of South Dakota, USA

My thanks to all the competitors, who took the time to really think about the question of how to show intercultural dialogue visually. Thanks to colleagues around the world, who helped spread the word about the competition. Thanks to the judges of the competition, professionals who made time to review student videos (and special thanks to Mary Schaffer, on the CID Advisory Board, who not only served herself but recruited the other judges, and helped guide me through the logistics.) Thanks to Heather Birks, for initially suggesting the idea, for arranging funding for the award to be provided by the Broadcast Education Association (BEA), for providing server space for the videos, and for JD Boyle, at BEA, to provide technical support. Thanks to Linda J. de Wit, former CID intern, for designing the poster. The competition would have been impossible without all of the work of all these people.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

Award of Excellence CID Video Competition: Coyote Creative Practicum

CID Video CompetitionCID’s first video competition is now over, and the judges have reviewed all the videos. As a reminder, the instructions were to answer the question “What does intercultural dialogue look like?” in 90-120 seconds, on video.

An award of excellence goes to students in the Coyote Creative Practicum, made up of Andrew Candela, Rebecca Vaca, Davis Van Egdom, Ezra Voigt, and Shiyuan Wang, all undergraduates studying Media and Journalism at the University of South Dakota. Judges praised the honest from-the-heart discussion, as well as the use of camera and editing.

Title: Chewing the Fat – Interculturally

Description: “The entry was produced by undergraduate students taking part in the Department of Media & Journalism’s Coyote Creative practicum class. The subjects in the video were minority students at the University of South Dakota (NOT the students who produced it). Their discussion was videotaped at USD’s Center for Diversity & Community on April 5, 2018. Special thanks go to Coyote Creative advisor, Todd Mechling, Instructor, Media & Journalism; Lamont Sellers, Associate Vice President for Diversity, Office of Diversity; and Marcus Destin, President, Union of African American Students, all at USD.”

There were first, second and third place winners, as well as 3 videos that merited awards of excellence. Each of these is being highlighted in a separate post, as they warrant our attention. My thanks to the judges of the competition, professionals who made time to review student videos. Thanks also to all the competitors, who took the time to really think about the question of how to show intercultural dialogue visually.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

Award of Excellence CID Video Competition: Estrella Oliva, Rabanal & Camacho

CID Video CompetitionCID’s first video competition is now over, and the judges have reviewed all the videos. As a reminder, the instructions were to answer the question “What does intercultural dialogue look like?” in 90-120 seconds, on video.

U Lima team photoAn award of excellence goes to Mónica Estrella Oliva, Gabriela Quevedo Rabanal and Renato Morales Camacho, who are all BA students in International Business at the University of Lima (Peru). Judges praised the excellent use of graphics and music, and the combination of live video with still photography, said it was simple but well done, and specifically mentioned the opening and closing. In terms of content, they said it shows clear understanding of intercultural dialogue.

Title: Different cultures, One same feeling

Description: “We tried to show what Intercultural Dialogue look like through our international friends, in order to have different opinions from many countries, and not just ours, so people can compare and, in the same way, know that they all have something in common.”

There were first, second and third place winners, as well as 3 videos that merited awards of excellence. Each of these is being highlighted in a separate post, as they warrant our attention. My thanks to the judges of the competition, professionals who made time to review student videos. Thanks also to all the competitors, who took the time to really think about the question of how to show intercultural dialogue visually.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

 

Award of Excellence CID Video Competition: Victoria Wasner

CID Video CompetitionCID’s first video competition is now over, and the judges have reviewed all the videos. As a reminder, the instructions were to answer the question “What does intercultural dialogue look like?” in 90-120 seconds, on video.

Victoria Wasner

An award of excellence goes to Victoria Wasner. She is doctoral student in Education at Durham University (UK). Judges praised her video as well put together, and said it truly got at the essence of intercultural dialogue. They found it entertaining, and liked the mix of music, still photos, and video clips.

Title: ‘Learning about, with and from each other’

Description: “Intercultural dialogue is ultimately about learning. We have to learn about each other so that we do not become culturally ignorant or blind to the reality of others whom we encounter. We have to learn with each other so that we can feel what it is like to live the reality of others. We have to learn from each other so that we understand that others have something to give us, not only that we may have something to give them. This short video captures moments from short visits of students and teachers at an international school in Switzerland to our friends in Orissa, India. When going there, it is the human contact that is important and the willingness to learn and let go of what we think we know about the world. I am a teacher, a researcher and ultimately a human being who believes in the transformative power of education. Intercultural dialogue is a vital part of that education.”

There were first, second and third place winners, as well as 3 videos that merited awards of excellence. Each of these is being highlighted in a separate post, as they warrant our attention. My thanks to the judges of the competition, professionals who made time to review student videos. Thanks also to all the competitors, who took the time to really think about the question of how to show intercultural dialogue visually.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

3rd Prize CID Video Competition: Sahiti Bonam

CID Video CompetitionCID’s first video competition is now over, and the judges have reviewed all the videos. As a reminder, the instructions were to answer the question “What does intercultural dialogue look like?” in 90-120 seconds, on video.

Sahiti Bonam

Third prize goes to Sahiti Bonam, who is a BA student in Visual Studies at Temple University (USA). Her website provides further information about her, and examples of her work.

 

 

Title: Accent

Description: “Accent is defined as “a distinctive manner of expression” according to the Merriam-Webster dictionary. The idea for this project is to question people whether they have an accent or not. I am using video as my medium for this project in order to capture the visuals and sounds of people saying whether or not they have an accent and to label where they are from. I think the idea of my project can be well reflected through video because it allows the viewer to determine whether an accent is a regional concept or a minority vs majority. As a stylistic choice, the video was taken up close of the participant, where only the mouth and nose were visible. The purpose of this was to be in the gray area of anonymity and identity. The bottom of each clip is the place where the participant is from. Some people in the video were my friends and others were completely random. I wanted to make sure that I didn’t guide or push the answers of the participants, so there would be a diversity in opinion.

From a linguistics perspective, everyone has an accent. This project was inspired by one of the lectures in my Intercultural Communication course, where we watched a documentary called “American Tongues”. The documentary was about the various accents of people in USA. My interest was piqued when some people interviewed in the documentary said that they have an accent, need to change their accent depending on their environment, or believe that they don’t have an accent.

I am interested in this topic because I believe that I do have an accent and that my accent changes depending on who I am with. My accent is influenced by the places I have lived and the people I am with. The change in accent and to be understood is called “code-switching”, which is mainly done so that the accent is standardized for the majority of people to understand you or when you are with a specific background of people.”

There were first, second and third place winners, as well as 3 videos that merited awards of excellence. Each of these is being highlighted in a separate post, as they warrant our attention. My thanks to the judges of the competition, professionals who made time to review student videos. Thanks also to all the competitors, who took the time to really think about the question of how to show intercultural dialogue visually.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

2nd Prize CID Video Competition: Class 5B

CID Video CompetitionCID’s first video competition is now over, and the judges have reviewed all the videos. As a reminder, the instructions were to answer the question “What does intercultural dialogue look like?” in 90-120 seconds, on video.

Class 5B

Second prize goes to Class 5B, the final year at the School of Arts “Aldo Passoni,” Turin (Italy). Students have 3 main fields of study: Graphic and Editorial Book Design, Industrial Design, and Textile and Fashion Design. Judges praised this video for creativity and originality, as well as for complexity and professionalism, said it was beautifully shot, and particularly mentioned both the music and the use of color.

Title: What does intercultural dialogue look like? It’s InterCOLORal Dialogue!

Description: Given that we are a multicultural and multilingual Institute, we decided to develop our video focusing on different words in different languages, and as we are a School of Arts we paired each word with a specific color. Indeed, works of art are a whole made up of different colors and brushstrokes, and this is how we understand intercultural dialogue: the participation and the contribution of each of us to a common project, that of mutual understanding. Within such a perspective, we view intercultural dialogue in the widest sense of a dialogue across all types of cultures linked not only to nationality or ethnicity, but also as a dynamic able to challenge all stereotypes regarding gender, sexual orientation, etc.

Specific credits:
Direction & Editing: Stefano Millesimo
Recording & Sound Engineering: Edoardo Denunzio, Bruno Alicata, Matteo Rizzo
Set: Bruno Alicata
Make-Up & Colors: Michela Geremia
Casting: Giorgia Culotta
Texts: Martina Dinoi

There were first, second and third place winners, as well as 3 videos that merited awards of excellence. Each of these is being highlighted in a separate post, as they warrant our attention. My thanks to the judges of the competition, professionals who made time to review student videos. Thanks also to all the competitors, who took the time to really think about the question of how to show intercultural dialogue visually.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue