Art & Intercultural Dialogue

Book note:
Gonçalves, S., & Majhanovich, S. (Eds.). (2016). Art and intercultural dialogue. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.

How can art act as an intercultural mediator for dialogue? In order to scrutinize this question, relevant theoretical ideas are discussed and artistic intervention projects examined so as to highlight its cultural, political, economic, social, and transformational impacts. This thought-provoking work reveals why art is needed to help multicultural neighbourhoods and societies be sustainable, as well as united by diversity. This edited collection underlines the significance of arts and media as a tool of understanding, mediation, and communication across and beyond cultures. The chapters with a variety of conceptual and methodological approaches from particular contexts demonstrate the complexity in the dynamics of (inter)cultural communication, culture, identity, arts, and media. Overall, the collection encourages readers to consider themselves as agents of the communication process promoting dialogue.

Contents and Preface

Anna Lindh Report 2014 Published

The Anna Lindh Foundation has just published its second report designed describing intercultural relations in the Mediterranean region; the first report appeared in 2010. The Anna Lindh Report 2014 again combines a Gallup Public Opinion Poll, representing the voices of 13,000 people across Europe and the Southern and Eastern Mediterranean region, with a wide range of analyses by a network of intercultural experts. Themes discussed include: social change in the EuroMed region, differences and similarities in value systems; the religious factor in intercultural relations; human mobility; the role of culture in Mediterranean relations; intercultural citizenship; the Union for the Mediterranean and regional cooperation.

A summary of the 10 major findings has been prepared as an infographic. Ilona Sābera Nukševica, a communication designer, has also discussed how she decided to present the findings visually.

Case Studies in Intercultural Dialogue

Case Studies in ICD
The book Case Studies in Intercultural Dialogue has just been published by Kendall-Hunt. It is edited by Nazan Haydari and Prue Holmes. The book focuses on the important and under-investigated concept of intercultural dialogue. It draws on cases of intercultural communication in which there is a dialogue, conflict or misunderstanding, and presents approaches, theories, and analytical tools that can be used to productively understand and/or resolve the issues presented in each case study.

This edited collection covers a wide range of research topics drawn from peace building, arts and media, education, anthropology, new communication technologies organizational communication, and more. The format of Case Studies in Intercultural Dialogue encourages readers to engage in discussion from different perspectives through various methodological and theoretical approaches to problems, opportunities, and ethical issues of intercultural communication.

The collection had its genesis in the NCA Summer Conference on Intercultural Dialogue, held in Istanbul in 2009, with half the chapters resulting from that event, and the other half the result of an international call for proposals. The table of contents follows:

Introduction: Contextualizing ‘Intercultural Dialogue’ and the ‘Case Study’ by Nazan Haydari & Prue Holmes

Part I: Building Spaces for Dialogue
Facilitating Intercultural Dialogue Through Innovative Conference Design by Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz

Part II: Dialogue for Peace Building and Reconciliation
Community Driven Peacebuilding Approaches: The Case of Postgenocide Rwanda by Eddah Mbula Mutua
Dialogue across the Divide: Bridging the Separation in Cyprus by Benjamin Broome

Part III: Building Dialogue in / for Education
Multiculturalism, Contact Zones and the Political Core of Intercultural Education by Susana Gonçalves
Dialogue as a Common Ground between, across and beyond Cultures and Disciplines: A Case Study of Transcultural and Transdisciplinary Communication Lectures for Graduate and Undergraduate Students by Maria Flora Mangano
Developing Cosmopolitan Professional Identities: Engaging Australian and Hong Kong Trainee Teachers in Intercultural Conversations by Erika Hepple
Challenges in International Baccalaureate Students’ Intercultural Dialogue by Gertrud Tarp

Part IV: Building Dialogue through Arts and Media
Bollywood in the City: Can the Consumption of Bollywood Cinema Serve as a Conduit/ Site for Intercultural Discovery and Dialogue? by Ruma Sen
Storms, Lies & Silence: Beyond Dialogue-Based Models of Intercultural Contact by David Gunn

Part V: Building Dialogue in/ through Research
Anthropology as Intercultural Critique: Challenging the Singularity of Islamic Identity by Tabassum “Ruhi” Khan.
Community Autoethnography: A Critical Visceral Way of “Doing” Intercultural Relationships by Sandra L. Pensoneau-Conway, Satoshi Toyosaki, Sachiko Tankei-Aminian & Farshad Aminian-Tankei

Part VI: Building Dialogue in Everyday
The Voices of Hispanic Emerging Adults in New Mexico and Oklahoma by David Duty

Part VII: Building Dialogue at the Institutional / Organizational Level
“Why did it All Go so Horribly Wrong?”: Intercultural Conflict in an NGO in New Zealand by Prue Holmes
Leadership in Intercultural Dialogue: A Discursive Approach by Jolanta Aritz & Robyn C. Walker

Part VIII: Building Dialogue through New Information Technologies
Le Francais en (premiere) Ligne: Creating Contexts for Intercultural Dialogue in the Classroom by Christine Develotte & Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
The Potential of Diasporic Discussion Forums for Intercultural Dialogue and Transcultural Communication: Case Studies in Moroccan and Turkish Diasporas in Germany by Çigdem Bozdağ

Difference & Globalization issue of Visual Communication

Out now — Special issue: Difference and Globalization, Visual Communication 13(3), August 2014
Guest editors: Giorgia Aiello (University of Leeds) and Luc Pauwels (University of Antwerp)

This special issue investigates the nexus of globalization and visual communication through a rich discussion of the significance of national, racial, ethnic, gender, class, embodied and emplaced differences. While globalization does entail the ever-growing significance of deterritorialized practices and transcultural flows, these connections, movements and exchanges still largely occur across specific locales and identities, and through appeals to various dimensions of cultural and social difference. The visual is an especially privileged and in fact crucial mode of communication in contexts of globalization thanks to its perceptual availability and cross-cultural potential.

Taken together, the seven contributions included in this special issue address questions related to the integration and deployment of major dimensions of social and cultural difference in visual communication materials; the perspectives and practices of designers, image-makers and media producers in relation to the work involved in the planning and creation of such materials; and both the dominant ways of seeing and unique experiences that impact on the visual ‘reading’ of globalization.

A combination of well-known and emerging scholars makes for an unusually energetic take on concepts and concerns that underlie several of the major frameworks that have become established in the inherently interdisciplinary field of visual communication, including multimodal and critical discourse analysis, social semiotics, rhetorical criticism, visual anthropology and visual sociology.

Table of contents
*Guest Editorial: Giorgia Aiello and Luc Pauwels
*Ariel Chen and David Machin: The local and the global in the visual design of a Chinese women’s lifestyle magazine: a multimodal critical discourse approach
*Giorgia Aiello and Greg Dickinson: Beyond authenticity: a visual-material analysis of locality in the
global redesign of Starbucks stores
*Toussaint Nothias: ‘Rising’, ‘hopeful’, ‘new’: visualizing Africa in the age of globalization
*Arjun Shankar: Towards a critical visual pedagogy: a response to the ‘end of poverty’ narrative
*Melissa A Johnson and Larissa Carneiro: Communicating visual identities on ethnic museum websites
*Helene Pristed Nielsen and Stine Thidemann Faber: A strange familiarity? Place perceptions among the globally mobile
*Luc Pauwels: World cities reframed: a visual take on globalization

Project for Advanced Research in Global Communication

 

PARGC Presents Inaugural PARGC Press Paper by Michael Curtin

The Project for Advanced Research in Global Communication (PARGC) is pleased to present PARGC Paper 1, the inaugural publication of PARGC Press, entitled In the Shadow of Official Ambition: National Media Policy Confronts Global Media Capital.

Michael Curtin gave PARGC’s Inaugural Distinguished Lecture in Global Communication at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania, on September 18, 2013— less than three months after PARGC’s founding on July 1, 2013.

The Publication of the lecture as PARGC Paper 1 inaugurates a new venture, PARGC Press, dedicated to publishing PARGC papers and co-publishing books resulting from PARGC symposia.

PARGC Paper 1 draws on Curtin’s current book project, Media Capital, which compares cities that have become centers of the global film and television industries, such as Bombay, Lagos, and Miami. In the paper, Curtin explores the implications of Chinese cultural policy within the broader context of media globalization, providing a framework for understanding the logics of media capital and the challenges confronting national governments, making comparisons to Arab, African, and Indian media, reflecting on the prospects for creativity and diversity in film and television.

Download here: http://bit.ly/1kqlBZ0

Contact:
Marina Krikorian
Project Coordinator
Project for Advanced Research in Global Communication
The Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania

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Impossible interculturality by Robert Aman

Book announcement:

Aman, Robert. (2014). Impossible Interculturality? Education and the Colonial Difference in a Multicultural World. Linköping, Sweden: Linköping University Electronic Press.

Abstract: An increasing number of educational policies, academic studies, and university courses today propagate ‘interculturality’ as a method for approaching ‘the Other’ and reconciling universal values and cultural specificities. Based on a thorough discussion of Europe’s colonial past and the hierarchies of knowledge that colonialism established, this dissertation interrogates the definitions of intercultural knowledge put forth by EU policy discourse, academic textbooks on interculturality, and students who have completed a university course on the subject. Taking a decolonial approach that makes its central concern the ways in which differences are formed and sustained through references to cultural identities, this study shows that interculturality, as defined in these texts, runs the risk of affirming a singular European outlook on the world, and of elevating this outlook into a universal law. Contrary to its selfproclaimed goal of learning from the Other, interculturality may in fact contribute to the repression of the Other by silencing those who are already muted. The dissertation suggests an alternative definition of interculturality, which is not framed in terms of cultural differences but in terms of colonial difference. This argument is substantiated by an analysis of the Latin American concept of interculturalidad, which derives from the struggles for public and political recognition among indigenous social movements in Bolivia, Ecuador and Peru. By bringing interculturalidad into the picture, with its roots in the particular and with strong reverberations of the historical experience of colonialism, this study explores the possibility of decentring the discourse of interculturality and its Eurocentric outlook. In this way, the dissertation argues that an emancipation from colonial legacies requires that we start seeing interculturality as inter-epistemic rather than simply inter-cultural.

 

 

Belarus book on Intercultural Dialogue

Uladykouskaja book

Любоў Уладыкоўская. Міжкультурны дыялог: амерыканская парадыгма / Л.Уладыкоўская. – Мінск, Установа “Міжкультурны дыялог”, 2014. – 92 с.

The scientific monograph  Intercultural Dialogue: American Paradigm by Liubou Uladykouskaja has just been published. This is the first book in Belarus devoted to intercultural dialogue issues. The book is written in Belarusian, with an introduction and information about the author in English. The book reveals the essence of the American paradigm of intercultural dialogue (including mention of the Center for Intercultural  Dialogue) in its comparing with the European conceptions. Uladykouskaja explains why the American approaches in the field of intercultural dialogue are important for Belarus. She believes that the secret to American success with intercultural dialogue is the precondition for, and has the result of, democracy.

According to Uladykouskaja, the American paradigm of intercultural dialogue includes the following characteristics:
— Universality, inclusiveness, and tolerance;
— Global standards of life of persons;
— Organic interaction of technology, traditions, and nature;
— Unconditional priority of freedom, life, equality, and justice;
— Dialogical thinking;
— Human and national dignity;
— Simplicity, expediency, functionality; and
— Strive for achievements, buoyancy.

Transformative Power of Dialogue

Review of:
Stephen W. Littlejohn & Sheila McNamee (Eds.). (2014). The coordinated management of meaning: A festschrift in honor of W. Barnett Pearce. Madison, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press.

by Robyn Penman

In 1980, Barnett Pearce and his colleague, Vern Cronen, published Communication, Action and Meaning, a seminal work introducing scholars to the theory of the coordinated management of meaning (CMM). Over the ensuing decades, CMM theory has continued to grow, reaching a wider and wider audience as the practical and theoretical relevance of Barnett’s work became increasingly acknowledged.

In recognition of Barnett’s outstanding scholarship, a conference, entitled the Transformative Power of Dialogue, was held in his honour in January 2011. The essays in this book collection emerged from that conference. I am one of the contributors to this volume and, as such, this review is more of a commendation than any conventional critical review.

The book opens with an essay written by Barnett shortly before his death, reflecting on what it could take for personal and social revolution to be brought about. As he put it, he has “bet my professional life” on following the risky, high stake path that this evolution “could be promoted by explicit attention to what we are making together in the forms of communication in which we engage” (p. 44).

Barnett’s bet has reaped its rewards, not the least of which is the extent to which he has inspired, encouraged and collaborated with an extraordinary range of scholars and practitioners, a sample of which is contained in the current volume. The very breadth, scholarship and wide-ranging practical import captured in the 15 essays bear witness to the rich offerings to be found in CMM and its broader communication perspective.

For those interested in intercultural dialogue, the central importance placed on dialogue in Barnett’s work, and in the essays in this volume, makes the book especially pertinent. One part of this volume is specifically devoted to the theme of dialogue. The topics include the role of systemic questioning (Victoria Chen), moral conflict and managing difference (Stephen Littlejohn), framing and conflict transformation (Linda Putnam), and generative community dialogue (Stanley Deetz).

Dialogue also emerges as a powerful theme throughout the other parts in the book. For example, I (Penman) consider the core relationship between dialogue and presence and what this means for understanding participation in mediated life. John Lannamann explores the key role of dialogue and its practice in cosmopolitan communication in making better social worlds. And Kim Pearce sums up the volume by talking about the pathway to personal and social evolution in terms of the “life of dialogue…that holds in tension, and compassion, the various stories, actions and people who loves us, or don’t, who are like us. . . . , or aren’t and who may challenge us to the core to remain civil and open” (p. 328).

For anyone interested in dialogue and its role in making better social worlds, this book should be a rewarding read.