Māori and Chinese, Māori and Pākehā

Applied ICD
This is a story about the formal welcome of an immigrant group (Chinese) into a new homeland (Australia). It ends with a question about broader applications.

On April 27, 2013, the Maori formally welcomed the Chinese community to Auckland at the Taniwha [a mythical being similar to a dragon] and Dragon Festival held on to Ōrākei marae [their ancestral home] to formalise a relationship between the two cultures. There was a pōhiri [formal welcoming ceremony] and festival.

“During the pōhiri, the kaikōrero [speakers] on both sides recounted the long-standing ties between Māori and Chinese families through market gardening, for instance, and sometimes the shared experience of racism. The festival afterwards highlighted common aspects of Māori and Chinese cultures — the significance of tīpuna [ancestors] and traditions, of taniwha [water spirits] and dragons, community dance, kite-flying. And, of course, food.”

After months of careful planning, thousands of people turned up, and the event was a success, with much learning on both sides. Which made Andrew Robb wonder, might it be appropriate and feasible to organize a comparable event for the Pākehā [White New Zealanders of European descent], many of whom have lived in New Zealand for generations, and now recognize the significance of Māori culture, yet never actually came in “through the front gate,” acknowledging the presence of a pre-existing culture.

And that leads to an even broader question: could new ceremonies be created to welcome various groups of immigrants to their new homelands (even if belatedly)? and if so, would they help smooth the integration process, on both sides?

Robb, A. (March 25, 2017). Are Pākehā up for the challenge? E-Tangata.

Georgia Institute of Technology: Visiting Prof of Chinese (USA)

“JobVisiting Assistant Professor of Chinese, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA. Deadline: 25 February 2019.

The School of Modern Languages at the Georgia Institute of Technology invites applications for Visiting Assistant Professor of Chinese. This position is full-time with a 2/2 teaching load and is renewable for up to two years.   The successful candidate will have (1) a PhD in hand by August 1, 2019; (2) native or near native-level competence in Chinese; (3) an active research and publication agenda; and (4) documented evidence of successful teaching of Chinese language, at both lower and upper levels, particularly content-based language courses. The candidate will join a robust Chinese program, with  undergraduate majors and minors in Chinese, as well as graduate level instruction. The candidate may teach a variety of courses of interest, including Chinese-American and Chinese culture; cross- and intercultural studies (including languages for business, technology, science, and heritage learners); environmental and media studies; Chinese civilization, thought and philosophy; and the Chinese classics, as well as other specialized courses. The candidate will also be involved in graduate curriculum development in Chinese. Preferred areas of expertise include Chinese-American culture; Chinese literature, culture, history, and media; environmental and digital humanities; and the study of science and technology.

Key Concept #10: Cross-Cultural Dialogue Translated into Simplified Chinese

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#10: Cross-Cultural Dialogue, which I first published in English in 2014, and which Yan Qiu has now translated into Simplified Chinese. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC10 Cross-Cultural Dialogue_Chinese-simLeeds-Hurwitz, W. (2017). Cross-cultural dialogue [Simplified Chinese]. (Y. Qiu, Trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 10. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2014/04/key-concept-cross-cultural-dialogue.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

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Key Concept 41: Yuan Translated into Chinese

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting the translation of KC41: Yuan. Hui-Ching Chang wrote this in English in 2014 and has now translated it into both Traditional Chinese and Simplified Chinese. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC41 Yuan_Chinese-trad
Yuan in Traditional Chinese
KC41 Yuan_Chinese Simplified
Yuan in Simplified Chinese

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chang, H.-C. (2017). Yuan [Traditional Chinese]. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 41. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/01/kc-41-yuan_chinese-trad2.pdf

Chang, H.-C. (2017). Yuan [Simplified Chinese]. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 41. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/01/kc-41-yuan_chinese-simplified.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concept #12: Third Culture Kids Translated into Chinese

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting the translation of KC12: Third Culture Kids, written by Anastasia Lijadi in English in 2014, previously translated into Indonesian, and now translated into both traditional and simplified Chinese by Wang Qi Chao; they are both affiliated with the University of Macau, China. Click on the thumbnail of the translation you wish to read. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC12 TCKs_Chinese trad
Traditional Chinese
KC12 TCKs_Chinese sim
Simplified Chinese

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lijadi, A. A. (2016). Third culture kids [Simplified Chinese]. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 12 (Q. C. Wang, Trans.). Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2016/07/kc12-tcks_chinese-sim.pdf

Lijadi, A. A. (2016). Third culture kids [Traditional Chinese]. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 12 (Q. C. Wang, Trans.). Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/01/kc-12-tcks_chinese-trad2.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concept #59 Teng Translated into Chinese

Key Concepts in ICDAs explained recently, some of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue are being translated into other languages than English. Today I am posting the translation of KC59: Teng, written by Todd Sandel, in English in 2015, and now translated into both traditional and simplified Chinese by Bei Ju (Jenny), both of the University of Macau, China. Click on the thumbnail of the translation you wish to read. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC59 Teng Chinese-trad
Traditional Chinese
KC59 Teng Chinese-simplified
Simplified Chinese

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sandel, T. (2016). Teng [Traditional Chinese]. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 59 (B. Ju, Trans.) Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2016/06/kc-59-teng-chinese-trad.pdf

Sandel, T. (2016). Teng [Simplified Chinese]. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 59 (B. Ju, Trans.) Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2016/06/kc-59-teng-chinese-sim.pdf

The goal of the translation project is to expand the concepts available to discussions of intercultural dialogue beyond those who are fluent in English. What began with a request to translate a few concepts into 2 languages has now developed into a serious effort to translate most of them. Choice of languages was left up to those who are doing the work, which has prompted much interesting discussion about whether to be organized about this (translating all of them into a single language, then moving on to the next). Obviously the decision was  not to take that route. Instead, authors are being given the opportunity to translate their own into whatever languages they know best; once they respond, their concepts are put on a list of those available to requests from others. If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.