Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence

Institutions are now invited to apply to the Fulbright Scholar-In-Residence Program.  The deadline is October 17, 2011. The S-I-R Program brings scholars from abroad to teach at U.S. colleges and universities, which can help internationalize curricula and campuses.

The Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence (S-I-R) Program assists U.S. higher education institutions in expanding programs of academic exchange. By supporting non-U.S. scholars through grants for teaching at institutions that might not have a strong international component, both the U.S. institution and the scholar grantee benefit. The Fulbright European Union Scholar-in-Residence (EU S-I-R) is a subset of the S-I-R Program that focuses specifically on strengthening expertise in European Union affairs by bringing scholars and professionals from the European Union to U.S. campuses.

One of the few Fulbright programs that serves institutions, S-I-R gives preference to Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Hispanic-serving institutions, Native American tribal colleges, community colleges and small, liberal arts institutions. There are many opportunities for larger institutions to partner with preference organizations. Your institution is invited to learn how S-I-R can help advance its international presence, assist in faculty and curriculum development, and diversify the educational experiences of its students, scholars and surrounding community.

For more information, a schedule of webinars and application details, visit www.iie.org/cies/sir/

Intercultural Dialogue through Community Media

The Near Media Co-op is seeking 8 participants (4 Irish and 4 non-EU nationals) to take part in a new project, “Intercultural Dialogue through Community Media.”

Participants will complete a FETAC Level 4 course in community radio and form a production team to create a series of 13 radio programmes on the theme of intercultural dialogue to be broadcast on Near90fm. The project will run from late April to mid-September 2011 and participants will be required to attend one full day per week for 7 weeks for FETAC training and thereafter 3 hours per week, for planning and producing the radio series. If you are an Irish or non-EU national interested in participating or would like further information, please contact the project coordinator:

grace@near.ie
Or on 01 848 5211

This project is co-financed by the European Commission under the European Integration Fund and is supported by the Office of the Minister for Integration and Pobal.

Study Abroad-China

I will be leading students from the University of Oklahoma on a four-week Study Abroad program in Kunming, China, June 17- July 14. Undergraduate students will take a three hour course that I teach, “Communication in Chinese Cultures” and a three hour course in East-West poetry. Currently this program is open only to students at the University of Oklahoma. However, if you are interested or know of students who might be interested, contact me and we can look into what could possibly be arranged.

We took students to China last summer and had a wonderful time. The city of Kunming is known as the city of “eternal spring” and has great weather, clean air, great food, and fascinating cultures. It is located in Yunnan Province, Southwest China, home to many non-Han ethnic groups. We will take students to Lijiang, home of the Naxi people, and Shangrila, where there are many Tibetans. It’s a great place to spend the summer, learn about China, and broaden your cultural horizons!

Contact me: tlsandel@ou.edu
See also my website: http://faculty-staff.ou.edu/S/Todd.L.Sandel-1/

Post-doc, U New Mexico

The Department of Communication & Journalism at the University of New Mexico invites applications for two post-doctoral fellowship appointments for fall, 2011. We are seeking scholars with substantial background in culture and communication, intercultural communication, and health, culture and communication. The department offers nationally recognized doctoral, masters and undergraduate degrees, and welcomes research that features diverse theoretical and methodological approaches. Our scholarly community features faculty and graduate students who are active in numerous professional associations, and who regularly collaborate with interdisciplinary institutes and programs such as the Latin American & Iberian Institute, Women Studies, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Applicants will be evaluated according to the overall quality of their academic preparation, the relevance of their research to the department’s academic priorities, evidence of teaching effectiveness, and strength of recommendations. Post-doctoral Fellows will have the opportunity to teach graduate and undergraduate courses and work with graduate students, will be invited to become involved in the Institute for Communication, Culture & Change, and will be expected to contribute to the department research colloquium series. Fellows will be expected to carry out research in their area of specialization and teach two courses each semester. Appointments will be for one year, renewable for up to two subsequent years.

Applicants must have an earned Ph.D. in Communication or a related field by the time of appointment.  A complete application consists of: (1) a signed letter of interest identifying areas of expertise and background, research interests, and teaching experience; (2) a curriculum vitae/academic resume including email address; (3) two samples of recent, representative publications or conference papers; (4) evidence of teaching effectiveness in introductory and advanced undergraduate courses, and graduate level courses, if appropriate; and (5) names and contact information for three references.

Send applications to Mary Jane Collier, Professor, Post-Doctoral Search Committee Chair, Department of Communication & Journalism, MSC03 2240, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001, FAX (505) 277-2608, or via email to mjc@unm.edu. Review of applications will begin April 15, 2011 and continue until the Fellowship positions are filled. The University of New Mexico is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer.

Hebrew University

On March 29, 2011, I gave an invited presentation at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem entitled “The Social Construction of Meaning in Intercultural Weddings.” This was the first of a series of talks this spring, as I travel to Israel, Azerbaijan, China, and Japan, making connections for the Center as I go.

Poster for Hebrew University

This photo was taken as the talk was getting organized. It includes Dr. Carmel L. Vaisman, Prof. Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Dr. Zohar Kampf, Prof. Tamir Sheafer, and Prof. Tamar Liebes.

Hebrew University, March 2011

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My thanks to Limor Shifman for organizing the event, and Esther Schely-Newman for helping to make it happen.

Several scholars promised to send researcher profiles to post to this site as a way to share information about their research. I will list them here as they arrive and are put up:
Zvi Bekerman
Ifat Maoz

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue

Andrew Carlin Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesAndrew CarlinAndrew Carlin (PhD University of Stirling, 2000) is an ethnographer and information specialist based in England. Currently he teaches Sociology at Manchester Metropolitan University. He has led and participated in numerous ethnographic inquiries in various settings and locations, including Belgium, England, Ireland, Northern Ireland, Scotland, and the United States. His doctoral work in Scotland was followed by a postdoctoral position at University College Dublin, Ireland; he returned to UCD as a College Lecturer at the School of Information & Library Studies. He has numerous teaching interests in Sociology and in Library & Information Studies.

His main research interests are the linguistic constitution of research methods and the social organization of scholarly communication; hence, his recent research focuses on Harold Garfinkel’s notion of ‘corpus status’. In a range of international, peer-reviewed journals and edited collections he has written about literature reviews and reference sections as ‘assembled objects’, the discipline-specific auspices of interdisciplinary research, mundane texts, and the social organization of public spaces.

For regular updates on current work see:
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Andrew_Carlin2

Recent publications include:

Carlin, Andrew P. 2017. Navigating the walkways: Radical inquiries and mental maps. Ethnographic Studies. 14, 24-48

Carlin, Andrew P. 2016. On some limits of interdisciplinarity. Social Epistemology. 30 (5-6), 624-642

Carlin, Andrew P. 2014. Working the crowds: Features of street performance in public space. In City Imaging: Regeneration, Renewal, and Decay, Ed. T. Brabazon, pp. 157-169. Dordrecht: Springer.

Carlin, Andrew P. & Slack, Roger S. 2013. Eds. Egon Bittner: Phenomenology-in-Action. Ethnographic Studies. 13, xxi+304

He can be contacted at a.carlin AT mmu.ac.uk

Esin Sultan Oğuz

COLLABORATIVE OPPORTUNITY

Esin Sultan Oğuz writes: “I’m working on developing multicultural library and information services for the British immigrants in Didim (-a sea side town in Turkey). For this purpose, between July and November I’ll carry on my post phd study in UCL Department of Information Management.

If there is anyone who is interested in this subject I also want to say in the near future I want to develop an EU project on this subject. Also I’m open for joint researches and projects as well.

The project description follows:

Developing Multicultural Library and Information Services for the Foreign Population in Turkey: A Project Addressed to European Immigrants in Didim

In recent years, there has been an increase in immigration to Turkey, mostly from Europe. Although the number of immigrants to Turkey is undeniably on the rise, there is no short or long term plan to integrate a multicultural library and information services into immigrant communities, thus necessitating the current study. Moreover, the international literature is replete with studies focusing on the integration of minorities including Muslim and Turkish populations into the European library system. However, research on the converse (integrating European populations into the Turkish library system) is virtually non-existent. The latter is especially important given the growing sensitivity with respect to the four cornerstones of multiculturalism—equality, tolerance, understanding and diversity. The need for an overhaul of the Turkish library system with the aim of making it more immigrant-friendly can no longer be overlooked given the immigrant ratio in the country. As Rasmussen and Kolarik have stated, the notion of equality implies equal access to resources and services available in the community. As it stands right now, foreigners in Turkey are at a huge disadvantage with respect to equal access to resources.

The goal of this project is to assist in the development of mutual understanding and tolerance among the various ethnic, linguistic and cultural groups in Turkey by establishing a framework for a multicultural library. Clearly, such a library would be conducive to cross-cultural exchange as it would serve as a locale where both immigrants, and Turks, could share their traditions, learn more about one another, and exchange experiences. Turkish multicultural libraries could also sponsor leisure activities, continuing education courses, and provide immigrants with access to useful legal information (the latter is especially important since there are no embassies and consulates outside of Ankara and Istanbul).

Didim, a small town located in southern Turkey near Aydin, has been selected as the location for this study due to its large European (specifically British) population. The number of immigrants in Didim has consistently risen since 2000, reaching a total of approximately 4000 individuals by 2011.”

Esin Sultan Oğuz, PhD.
Hacettepe University
Department of Information Management
Ankara, Turkey
http://www.esinsultan.info

NOTE:
One of the goals of the Center for Intercultural Dialogue is to help researchers connect with one another across international boundaries. This is one of a series of posts describing particular research projects, focusing on future collaborative opportunities. Click on the Category term “Collaborative Opportunity” (bottom left of any page on the site) to view all profiles posted to the site. If you are a Communication researcher interested in having a potential project described on the site, send information to intercult.dialogue@gmail.com

Grant opportunity – Global connections

GRANT OPPORTUNITY

The State Department’s: Global Connections and Exchange Program just issued a Request for Grant Proposals (RFGP) that involves digital storytelling, social networking, and project-based learning. This is a competition for the Global Connections and Exchange Program, the Department’s “virtual exchange program,” meaning that most of the interaction between foreign and U.S. students takes place online.

The Youth Programs Division, Office of Citizen Exchanges of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs announces an open competition for two or three projects under the Global Connections and Exchange Program (GCE) in the following countries worldwide: Bolivia, Botswana, Ecuador, Ethiopia, Ghana, Mongolia, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Oman, Pakistan, Peru, the Philippines, Samoa, Tajikistan, Thailand, Venezuela, Vietnam, and the United States. Public and private non-profit organizations meeting the provisions described in Internal Revenue Code section 26 USC 501c(3) may submit proposals to facilitate online and face-to-face exchanges between overseas schools and/or community youth organizations and counterparts in the United States.

The Global Connections and Exchange Program utilizes technology to create a U.S. presence in areas where many citizens may have little opportunity to travel or participate in exchange programs. Through web chats and discussion boards, foreign teachers, students/youths and youth leaders participate in dialogues with U.S. peers about their lives, families and communities. In addition, theme- based curriculum projects will increase understanding of issues relevant to both U.S. and overseas participants and harness their energies to effect positive change in their communities.

For details, please take a look at their Request for Grant Proposals, under Global Connections and Exchange Program. Multiple other, potentially relevant programs are also listed in that call for proposals.

Books available for review

The following books are available for review at the Journal of Language and Social Psychology.  If you are interested in reviewing, please email the book review editor (Jake Harwood: jharwood@u.arizona.edu), including brief indication of which book(s) you wish to review, any relevant qualifications/conflicts of interest, and a mailing address. A copy of the book is provided, and reviews are expected within 3 months of receipt of the book.

Language and sexism (Mills) — Cambridge
A history of communications (Poe) — Cambridge
Emotions in multiple languages (Dewaele) — Palgrave
Anti- and Pro-Social Communication (Kinney & Porhola) — Lang
Cultural processes (Leung et al.) — Cambridge
Conversation and gender (Speer and Stokoe) — Cambridge
English around the world (Schneider) — Cambridge
Dialogue: The mixed game (Weigand) – Benjamins
Social psychology and discourse (McKinlay & McVittie) — Wiley
Variation in indigenous minority languages (Stanford & Preston) — Benjamins
Clinical pragmatics (Cummings) — Cambridge
Sign languages (Brentari) — Cambridge
The social psychology of English as a global language (McKenzie) — Springer
Language, migration, and identity (Goebel) – Cambridge
Investigation in sociohistorical linguistics (Trudgill) — Cambridge
The language of statutes (Solan) – Chicago
Language, gender, and sexual identity (Motschenbacher) — Benjamins
Motivation and second language acquisition (Gardner) — Lang
Predicative minds (Bogdan) – MIT Press
_______________________
Jake Harwood, Professor & Interim Head
Department of Communication
1103 E. University Blvd.
University of Arizona
PO Box 210025
Tucson, AZ 85721-0025
ph: 520-626-8681
fax: 520-621-5504
jharwood@u.arizona.edu
www.u.arizona.edu/~jharwood