KC24 Asiacentricity Translated into Japanese

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#24: Asiacentricity, which Yoshitaka Miike wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which he has now translated into Japanese.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized alphabetically by concept, chronologically by publication date and number, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC24 Asiacentricity_Japanese

Miike, Y. (2019). Asiacentricity [Japanese]. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 24. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2019/10/kc24-asiacentricity_japanese-2.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

KC23 Afrocentricity Translated into Japanese

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#23: Afrocentricity, which Molefi Kete Asante wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Yoshitaka Miike has now translated into Japanese.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized alphabetically by concept, chronologically by publication date and number, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC23 Afrocentricity_Japanese

Asante, M. K. (2019). Afrocentricity [Japanese] (Y. Miike, trans.). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 23. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2019/10/kc23-afrocentricity-japanese-2.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concept #24: Asiacentricity by Yoshitaka Miike

Key Concepts in ICDThe next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. This is KC24: Asiacentricity by Yoshitaka Miike. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download.Lists organized  chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

kc24-sm

Miike, Y. (2014). Asiacentricity. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 24. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2014/07/key-concept-asiacentricity2.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Miike reflection on international/cultural communication

On Inheriting the Fields of International and Intercultural Communication: A Personal Reflection*
Yoshitaka Miike (University of Hawai‘i at Hilo)

To inherit is to receive as legacy, place adequate value on and make a part of one’s life. But to be a custodian of a great legacy is to guard, preserve, expand and promote it. It is to honor it by building on and expanding it and, in turn, leaving it as an enriched legacy for future generations.

Maulana Karenga (1996, p. 551)

The International and Intercultural Communication Division (IICD) of the National Communication Association (NCA) was founded as a commission in 1971 and later formed as a division in 1984. I am thus the 42nd incoming chair of this flourishing division. When I think about the history of the IICD and its critical role in advocating diversity and advancing internationalization within the NCA, I feel the heavy weight of the gavel that Dr. S. Lily Mendoza at Oakland University passed to me in Washington, D.C. With an eye on the 100th Anniversary of the NCA next year, I would like to offer a personal year-end reflection on how we may inherit the fields of international and intercultural communication. More specifically, I wish to suggest that we (1) “create a community of a larger memory” of our fields (to borrow Dr. Ronald Takaki’s [1998] words), (2) clarify our theoretical ideas  and practical issues without sacrificing their complexities, and (3) generate knowledge that bridges differences especially from non-U.S. and non-elite perspectives.

*Source: Miike, Y. (2013, December). On Inheriting the Fields of International and Intercultural Communication: A Personal Reflection. National Communication Association’s International and Intercultural Communication Division Newsletter, pp. 4-7.

Recommended UNESCO Documents for Interculturalists

UNESCO sees intercultural dialogue as a central topic, and publishes frequently on related issues. In addition to the Intercultural Competences booklet that I worked on last year, which has had hundreds and hundreds of downloads from this site alone, several other publications may be of interest to intercultural scholars.

A Common Framework for the Ethics of the 21st Century

A New Cultural Policy Agenda for Development and Mutual Understanding

Asian-Arab Philosophical Dialogues on Globalization, Democracy and Human Rights

Cultural Diversity and Transversal Values: East-West Dialogue on Spiritual and Secular Dynamics

Exploring Synergies between Faith Values and Education for Sustainable Development

What UNESCO for the Future? Forum of Reflexion

World Social Science Report 2010: Knowledge Divides

My thanks to Yoshitaka Miike for these suggestions!

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

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IICD NCA CFP

International and Intercultural Communication Division
National Communication Association
Call for Papers

The International and Intercultural Communication Division of the National Communication Association is ready to receive submissions relevant to communication in cultural, intercultural, or international contexts. Three kinds of submissions will be considered: (1) individual papers, (2) paper sessions, and (3) panel discussions on international and intercultural communication topics. The theme for the 2013 Annual Convention in Washington, DC is “Connections,” which invites us to explore communication and connections/disconnections of people, ideas, disciplines, units, and institutions that empower and constrain us. Papers, sessions, and panels that address and develop the convention theme as it relates to cultural issues are strongly encouraged. The deadline for submission of all materials is Wednesday, March 27, 2013 at 11:59 pm Pacific Standard Time (PST). All submissions must be made via NCA Submission Central, which opens on January 14. Emailed or mailed submissions will not be accepted. For a definition of submission types, please refer to the step-by-step “How to Submit” Instructions provided in the Convention Resource Library.

The following are the specific requirements for each submission category:

1. Individual Papers: Individual paper submissions should include a 100-word abstract and are limited to 25 pages of text. (Appendix, references, and tables are not counted within the 25-page limit.) Longer papers must be edited to meet the 25-page requirement. Only complete papers will be considered for this category. Individual paper submissions should NOT contain identifying information (author name, university affiliation). We follow a blind review process. Please indicate on the electronic submission forms whether you want your individual paper submission to be considered as a student paper selection or for the Scholar-to-Scholar sessions. Student papers should be clearly marked as such to be eligible for top student honors in the division as well as the Donald P. Cushman Award for top student paper in NCA. To be eligible for either award, ALL authors must be students. Only one paper per author will be accepted, with one additional co-authored paper permitted for the division; if two sole-authored papers are submitted, the highest ranking will be accepted. The same paper may not be submitted to more than one division. Submissions should be original work, by the authors named, not previously presented at this or other conferences, and not previously published.

2. Paper Sessions: Submissions must include (a) a session title, (b) presenters, a session chair, and a respondent, (c) a general description of the session theme, (d) a statement of the rationale, and (e) titles and abstracts of the individual papers.

3. Panel Discussions: Submissions must include (a) a panel title, (b) the name and affiliation of each presenter, (c) a session chair, (d) a panel description, (e) a rationale outlining the importance of the submission.

All submitters are encouraged to review the NCA Professional Standards for Convention Participants prior to submission. Again, all materials must be submitted online through NCA Submission Central. Proposals for special programming (Connections within Communication, Connections to the Community, and DC Connections), GIFTS (Great Ideas for Teaching Students), preconferences, Roundtable on Research in Progress, seminars, and short courses should be submitted directly to program planners for those areas. All submissions MUST list any A/V requirements at the time of submission. No program should consist of members from only one institution. Check your email address listed in NCA Submission Central before or after submission as all correspondence goes there. Deadline: Wednesday, March 27, 2013 at 11:59 pm Pacific Standard Time (PST).

Contact: Yoshitaka Miike, Vice Chair of the NCA IIC Division and division organizer for Washington, DC, Department of Communication, Humanities Division, University of Hawai‘i at Hilo, 200 West Kawili Street, Hilo, HI 96720-4091, Phone: (808) 974-7780, Email: ymiike AT hawaii.edu.

Yoshitaka Miike Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesYoshitaka Miike is Professor of Intercultural Communication at the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo, where he has been on the faculty since 2004 and chaired the Department of Communication from 2013 to 2015.

Yoshitaka Miike

He teaches courses in the areas of Asian communication, intercultural communication, and communication ethics. He is Senior Fellow at the Molefi Kete Asante Institute for Afrocentric Studies and Past Chair of the International and Intercultural Communication Division (IICD) of the National Communication Association (NCA). He was a member of the NCA Legislative Assembly from 2012 to 2014. He received an NCA IICD 2004 Distinguished Scholarship Award for the 2003 Outstanding Article of the Year. He holds one of the first M.A.s in Communication Studies from Dokkyo University (Japan) and earned, with distinction, his Ph.D. in Intercultural Communication from the University of New Mexico (USA).

Dr. Miike is best known for his metatheory of Asiacentricity as an alternative paradigm for the study of Asian cultures and communication. He co-edited The Global Intercultural Communication Reader (2nd Edition, Routledge, 2014) and guest-edited four journal special issues/section on Asian communication theory. His numerous essays appeared in such outlets as Communication Monographs, Encyclopedia of Identity, Handbook of Communication Science, Handbook of Critical Intercultural Communication, Howard Journal of Communications, Intercultural Communication: A Reader, International and Intercultural Communication Annual, International Encyclopedia of Communication Theory and Philosophy, Keio Communication Review, and Review of Communication. His recent research focuses on the history of the field of Asian communication theory, non-Western traditions of communication ethics, and aspects of Japanese culture and communication.

Dr. Miike currently serves on the editorial boards of the Asian Journal of Communication, China Media Research, Intercultural Communication Studies, International Encyclopedia of Intercultural Communication, Journal of Black Studies, Journal of Content, Community and Communication, Journal of International and Intercultural Communication, and Universal Write. He has reviewed manuscripts for many national and international journals including Communication Yearbook, International Communication Gazette, Journal of Intercultural Communication Research, Journal of International Communication, and Language and Intercultural Communication. He was Review Article Editor of the Journal of Multicultural Discourses for 2011-2016 and the 3rd Vice President of the Pacific and Asian Communication Association for 2006-2008.

Selected Publications:

Miike, Y. (2019). Intercultural communication ethics: An Asiacentric perspective. Journal of International Communication25(2), 159-192.

Miike, Y. (2019). The Asiacentric idea in communication: Understanding the significance of a paradigm. Seinan Studies in English Language and Literature, 60(1), 49-73.

Miike, Y. (2018). Asiacentricity. In Y. Y. Kim (Ed.), The international encyclopedia of intercultural communication (Vol. 1, pp. 39-46). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.

Miike, Y. (2017). Between conflict and harmony in the human family: Asiacentricity and its ethical imperative for intercultural communication. In X. Dai & G.-M. Chen (Eds.), Conflict management and intercultural communication: The art of intercultural harmony (pp. 38-65). London, UK: Routledge.

Miike, Y. (2017). Non-Western theories of communication: Indigenous ideas and insights. In L. Chen (Ed.), Handbooks of communication science: Vol. 9. Intercultural communication (pp. 67-97). Berlin, Germany: De Gruyter Mouton.

Miike, Y. (2016). Asiacentricity. In K. B. Jensen & R. T. Craig (Eds.), The international encyclopedia of communication theory and philosophy (pp. 126-130). West Sussex, UK: John Wiley & Sons.

Miike, Y. (2016). Asian communication studies at the crossroads: A view to the future from an Asiacentric framework. Journal of Content, Community and Communication, 3, 1-6.

Miike, Y. (2016). Theoretical perspectives on culture and communication: An Asiacentric bibliography. China Media Research, 12(4), 93-104.

Miike, Y. (2015). “Harmony without uniformity”: An Asiacentric worldview and its communicative implications. In L. A. Samovar, R. E. Porter, E. R. McDaniel, & C. S. Roy (Eds.), Intercultural communication: A reader (14th ed., pp. 27-41). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.

Miike, Y., & Yin, J. (2015). Asiacentricity and shapes of the future: Envisioning the field of intercultural communication in the globalization era. In L. A. Samovar, R. E. Porter, E. R. McDaniel, & C. S. Roy (Eds.), Intercultural communication: A reader (14th ed., pp. 449-465). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.

Miike, Y. (2014). The Asiacentric turn in Asian communication studies: Shifting paradigms and changing perspectives. In M. K. Asante, Y. Miike, & J. Yin (Eds.), The global intercultural communication reader (2nd ed., pp. 111-133). New York, NY: Routledge.

Miike, Y. (2014). Intercultural communication as a field of study: A selected bibliography of theory and research. In M. K. Asante, Y. Miike, & J. Yin (Eds.), The global intercultural communication reader (2nd ed., pp. 515-556). New York, NY: Routledge.

Asante, M. K., & Miike, Y. (2013). Paradigmatic issues in intercultural communication studies: An Afrocentric-Asiacentric dialogue. China Media Research, 9(3), 1-19.