International Electoral Observers Training (Italy)

Applied ICDInternational Electoral Observers (IEO) – Training by European Inter-University Centre for Human Rights and Democratisation (EIUC). March 19-24, 2018 (Italy).

Open and legitimate elections are at the basis of both sustainable development and effective democracy. Actions supporting the right to participate in genuine elections can play a major role in sustaining peace, security and conflict prevention. This support takes the form of electoral assistance projects and election observation missions, all activities that requires skilled and trained observers.

THE PROGRAMME

The aim of the training seminar is to deepen the theoretical and practical expertise on election observation missions in providing participants with practical skills which will be an asset in case of further applications as international observers.

Starting with a thorough introduction on the international observation theory and legal standards, the course will analyse the practical life of a short term observer from the selection procedure to the end of the mission including the observation of the polls, the filling of the forms, the reporting system and the code of conduct. The methodology will combine frontal lecturers in plenary, working groups as well as role plays, discussions and simulation exercises. Participants will also be introduced to the long-term election observation by analysing in depth some of the aspects related to an international observation mission such as working relations, interviewing techniques, media and security.

Deadline early bird enrolment: 25 January 2018
Registration deadline: 15 February 2018
Course dates19-24 March 2018
Venue: EIUC premises in Venice Lido at the Monastery of San Nicolò.

Fundamental Rights Strategic Litigation Training (Italy)

Applied ICDEIUC is glad to announce the launch of ACTIONES (the multi-stakeholder training session of the EU funded ACTIONES project) open to representatives of non-governmental organisations (NGOs), National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs), Equality Bodies (EBs); judges; public officials; individual litigants.

Fundamental Rights Strategic Litigation à la Carte in the EU ACTIONES Multi-Stakeholder Training

This is the final multi-stakeholder training session of the EU funded ACTIONES project, which targets legal professionals with the aim to explore potential of the Charter of Fundamental Rights as the basis of the strategic litigation. The training puts a specific emphasis on the dynamically growing area of illegal migration and asylum.

THE PROGRAMME

The 3-days training is organised around three main areas. The role of the different actors before, during and after litigation, the role of the different instances at the regional and international levels, and the policy implications of strategic litigation; strategic litigation on the basis of selected fundamental rights protected by the EU Charter, such as non-discrimination, consumer protection, environmental rights; highlights of best practices and challenges from own practice. Case studies on procedural issues relating to public interest litigation will be analysed and the learning will be closed by a simulation exercise.

THE PARTNERS

ACTIONES is coordinated by the European University Institute Centre for Judicial Cooperation and involves the following 16 partner institutions: Association of European Administrative Judges, College of Europe, Croatian Judicial Academy, Estonian Supreme Court, EIUC, National Association of the Romanian Bars, Polish National School of Judiciary and Public Prosecution, Romanian National Institute of Magistracy, Slovenian Judicial training Centre, Spanish General Council for the Judiciary, University of Amsterdam, University of Ljubjana, University of Parma, University of Pompeu Fabra, University of Uppsala, Italian School for the Magistracy.

Registration deadline: 1 August 2017
Course dates: 16-18 October 2017

Venue: EIUC premises in Venice Lido at the Monastery of San Nicolò Admission requirements: Eligible are representatives of non-governmental organisations (NGOs), National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs), Equality Bodies (EBs); judges; public officials; individual litigants.

Venice Academy of Human Rights 2017

Applied ICDThe European Inter-University Centre for Human Rights and Democratisation’s Venice Academy of Human Rights is accepting applications for its summer program. Please have a look at the call for applications and the detailed program on their website.

Key Facts
Theme: Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights as an Answer to Rising Inequalities
Dates: Monday, 3 July – Wednesday, 12 July 2017
Application Deadline: 14 May 2017
Faculty: Branko Milanović (opening lecture), Olivier De Schutter (general course), Wilfried Altzinger, Andreas Føllesdal, Dzidek Kędzia, Miloon Kothari, Manfred Nowak, Kate Pickett, Heisoo Shin
Participants: Academics, practitioners, PhD/JSD and master students
Type of courses: Lectures, seminars, discussion sessions and panel presentations
Number of hours: 34 hours
Venue: EIUC, Monastery of San Nicolò, Venice – Lido, Italy

Economic, Social and Cultural Rights as an Answer to Rising Inequalities
Instead of “the end of history”, we have lived through a major financial crisis, including a debt crisis in Europe that is far from over, and we are currently witnessing threats to democratic governance both from outside and from within the democratic system. Whether these are only temporary setbacks in the global spread of liberal democracy and neoliberal capitalism has to been seen. However, it is reason to pause and reconsider the prospects for economic and social justice against the background of rising inequalities in the world.

The Venice Academy of Human Rights 2017, in co-operation with PluriCourts – Centre of Excellence for the Study of the Legitimate Roles of the Judiciary in the Global Order, looks at these developments from an interdisciplinary perspective that combines law, economics, politics and sociology. Lectures and seminars by the distinguished faculty discuss the question what role do human rights play in enabling and promoting social justice. Are human rights an effective tool for the promotion of economic and social equality? Do human rights impose limits to privatization of particular goods and services? How do human rights enable a just economic and social order? These are but some of the questions that participants of the Academy will discuss in an intense programme over ten days next summer.

Venice Academy of Human Rights
The Venice Academy of Human Rights is an international programme of excellence for human rights education, research and debate. It forms part of the European Inter-University Centre for Human Rights and Democratisation (EIUC).

The Academy offers interdisciplinary thematic programmes open to academics, practitioners, doctoral and master students with an advanced knowledge of human rights. Participants attend morning lectures, participate in discussion sessions and workshops and can exchange views, ideas and arguments with leading international scholars and experts. This includes the opportunity for a number of participants to present and discuss their own “work in progress” such as drafts of articles, chapters of books or doctoral theses and receive comments from faculty members and peers.

At the end of the programme, participants receive a Certificate of Attendance issued by the Venice Academy of Human Rights.

Venice School of Human Rights/Academy of Human Rights 2017 (Italy)

Venice School of Human Rights
9-17 June 2017

European InterUniversity Centre for Human Rights and Democratisation (EIUC) Venice School of Human Rights was born in 2010 with the goal of studying today’s challenges in the field of human rights. It allows its participants coming from all over the world to list these challenges and examine their reasons and possible solutions they can deploy. The EIUC Venice School at the same time, combines theory and practice and its faculty involves both academics and practitioners. The Venice School intends to highlight that the respect for human rights is the responsibility of all, that «Human Rights are our responsibility».

Courses are scheduled to take place in Venice at the premises of EIUC over a period of 9 days. The venue of the European Inter-University Centre for Human Rights and Democratisation is the graceful Benedictine Monastery of San Nicolò, situated on the lagoon side of the Lido of Venice. The Monastery was founded in the 11th century and transformed into a Renaissance cloister in the 16th century. After the suppression of the Benedictine order in 1770, the monastery was re-opened by Franciscan monks for educational purposes.


Venice Academy of Human Rights
3 – 12 July 2017

The Venice Academy of Human Rights is a centre of excellence for human rights education, research and debate. It hosts distinguished experts to promote critical and useful research,
innovation and exchange of current knowledge. The theme Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights as an Answer to Rising Inequalities discusses the prospects for economic and social justice against the background of rising inequalities in the
world. Are human rights an effective tool for the promotion of economic and social equality? Do human rights impose limits to privatization of particular goods and services? How do human rights enable a just economic and social order? These are but some of the questions that participants of the Academy will discuss in an intense programme over ten days this summer.

Branko Milanović, Visiting Presidential Professor at the Graduate Center City University of New York and a LIS Senior Scholar, is going to deliver the opening lecture of the Venice Academy of Human Rights.
Olivier De Schutter, Professor at the University of Louvain (UCL) and at SciencesPo (Paris), will deliver the general course.

Type of courses: Lectures, seminars, discussion sessions and panel presentations
Number of hours: 34 hours
Venue: Monastery of San Nicolò, Venice Lido, Italy

CFP ECREA Doctoral Summer School 2017 (Italy)

The European Media and Communication Doctoral Summer School

… brings together members of the European research community to this summer school in order to debate contemporary issues in media, communication and cultural studies. The summer school aims to provide a supportive international setting where doctoral students can present their ongoing work, receive feedback on their PhD-projects from international experts and meet students and academics from other countries, establishing valuable contacts for the future. The 2017 Summer School will take place at Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milan, Italy from July 24 to August 4, 2017. The application phase for the European Media and Communication Doctoral Summer School 2017 is now open. The deadline for submitting the application is April 1, 2017.

Intercultural Communication or Post-Cultural Communication?

Guest Post by Paola Giorgis

Intercultural communication or post-cultural communication? Reflecting on mistakes in intercultural encounters

Some years ago, I worked with a total of about 350 refugees who, with the help of some radical activists, had become squatters, taking over an empty building which occupied almost an entire block. Most were from Somalia, Eritrea and Sudan; the majority were young men, a few women with children, and there were one or two couples with babies. A group of associations had gathered to offer help and, as an activist and volunteer in an association for human rights, I decided to participate. With the on-and-off support of the local Institutions (mainly town council and prefecture), the group of associations developed a project which had the goal of meeting basic needs – food, shelter, health care – and then organizing the integration of the refugees into the region through accommodation, language classes and vocational training courses. What I liked about this project was that its goal was not assistance, but rather creating a path to autonomy and independence. The first to be integrated were the women with their children, then the vulnerable males (young men with diseases or handicaps), and then all the rest. The project lasted for about one year, and at the end of that time, all the refugees were, more or less successfully, integrated and settled in the region.

Most of the activists, me included, had a regular job, so we had to organize shifts to bring food (which was offered by some associations involved in the project), to take women and children to hospital, to the lawyers who were following their cases, or to the communal baths, as the place where the refugees stayed had no water facilities.

As one can imagine, conditions were really hard. People were crowded into a small space, with no heating or electricity, they were frustrated and angry, and these conditions sometimes fueled fights, which we volunteers had to deal with – trying not to involve the police as much as we could, as they would have immediately evacuated the building.

I felt frustrated and angry myself, as I could not conceive how so many people could be left to live in such conditions in a so-called civilized western country. There were many political issues at stake, and things were not always easy within the different groups of volunteers and activists, as well as between the associations involved.

With no formal, or even informal, training, I found myself confronted with an asymmetrical intercultural context of relations involving all the sensitive issues of potential intercultural misunderstanding and conflict:

Issues at Stake Volunteers Refugees
Role – issue of power active (the ‘givers’; the ‘helpers’) passive (the ‘receivers’; the ‘helped’)
Gender mostly female mostly male
Age mostly middle-aged women mostly young men
Religion mostly non-religious or atheist mostly religious
Language mostly monolingual mostly monolinguals (different languages than the volunteers)

To manage each of these issues, cultural and linguistic mediators were involved, but things were not always easy for them either, as sometimes they were not accepted by their own community – when, for example, they belonged to a different ethnic group than the majority of their group – and it sometimes happened that we volunteers had to mediate between the groups and their own mediators.

In a few words, situation was very complex, I was totally unprepared to deal with it, and I made all of the possible mistakes.

First of all, as there were so many people, I perceived them as groups rather than individuals – on one floor were the Sudanese, on the other the Somali women, on the next the Somali men, etc. It was only little by little, and when people were less, that I could see and appreciate differences between them, but sometimes it was too late as they were about to leave. Another mistake was that, as they all had very basic needs, I was mainly focused on doing things – bringing food, taking them to hospital, etc. – rather than trying to get some time to simply be there, stay with them, and get to know them. That attitude contributed to creating fixed roles on both sides, and sometimes I felt frustrated as I had the impression I was perceived only as a problem-solving machine. Fixed roles also meant that I saw the refugees as people in need, which of course they were, but the fact was that I could only see one side of the coin, and I was not able to notice and relish their resources and skills, which of course were many – and which, again, I was able to see only later on in our relationship. Given that several issues were at stake simultaneously, I found it difficult to cope with them: being totally untrained for this context, I swung from an almost omnipotent attitude to a sense of impotence, a fluctuation which caused frustration to me as well as to the refugees. The sense of guilt which derived from this fueled my sense of inadequacy, and only after a while was I able to replace it with a sense of responsibility able to trace good boundaries, which prevented both peaks and valleys and therefore offered greater stability to the refugees, and to myself too.

Though I made a lot mistakes, some of the refugees were able to see beyond them (a good example of their resources and skills, by the way), and that brought about several episodes where true communication occurred. For example, one day an old wise man from Sudan invited me to have a coffee in a nearby café. As soon as we got out of the building, our roles blurred: I was no longer the person who provided food, and he was no longer a person in need, but we were just two people going to have a coffee together. In the café, we talked in English about our families, and exchanged comments and opinions about children’s education. Another day, a woman invited me into her room – women rarely went out of the building, and when they did, it was to go to the doctor, or to the hospital for their kids. She offered to comb my hair; I sat down and she combed my hair in silence because I could not speak her language, nor she could speak mine. It was a precious moment of silent dialogue, as when another woman invited me to have tea in her room. We spent some time together drinking tea in silence, smiling to each other. And though there was actually not much to laugh about in general, it also happened that, with some of the refugees, we enjoyed a good laugh together – for example, we often laughed at my efforts to say some words in their language. Actually, we found out that trying to look at things, and ourselves, from a slightly different and, when possible, even humorous perspective was a good way to relieve tensions and stress, and to create connections.

We were painfully aware that this subversion of roles was only temporary, and that we would soon return to our highly asymmetrical conditions; yet, these moments created the opportunity for relationship and dialogue. I think these episodes occurred when (and because) we reciprocally put down our pre-established roles (in fact, when we decided, more or less consciously, to subvert them), and we were mutually open, curious, and generous. Then, are these attitudes – not taking people or people’s roles for granted, openness, curiosity, generosity and a little sense of humor  – the fundamental characteristics of good intercultural communication? I don’t think these were episodes where intercultural communication occurred: we did not communicate so much between cultures as between individuals. Therefore, I now wonder: haven’t we devoted too much attention to ‘culture’ in ‘intercultural communication’, and not enough to individuals as the primary protagonists, and on what can encourage (or hinder) communication between them – which does not necessarily have much to do with ‘culture’? So, I ask myself whether it would be useful to critically consider intercultural communication itself, focusing more on what happens between individuals rather than between cultures. In sum: what if we try to think beyond cultures, and consider post-cultural communication as an option?

Gustolab Study Abroad: Food Systems (Vietnam, Italy or Japan)

Gustolab International has announced an expansion of their popular Critical Studies on Food summer program. Beginning summer 2017, there will be three complementary programs in Vietnam, Italy, and Japan.

CRITICAL STUDIES ON FOOD SYSTEMS AND SUSTAINABILITY IN VIETNAM
DURATION: 4-week Full Immersion Program
WHEN: May 21 – June 18, 2017

COURSES OFFERED
* Food Systems in Vietnam (3 credits)
* Vietnam, Conflict, Contradiction and Change (3 credits)
* Vietnamese Language for Food and Business (up to 3 credits)

CRITICAL STUDIES ON FOOD SYSTEMS AND SUSTAINABILITY IN ITALY
DURATION: 5-week Full Immersion Program
WHEN: May 22, 2017 – June 24, 2017
WHERE: ROME, ITALY

COURSES OFFERED
* Critical Studies on Food Culture (3 credits)
* Food Media, Communication and Trends (3 credits)
* Food, Nutrition and Culture in Italy (3 credits)
* Food Waste in Italy (3 credits) NEW!
* Italian Language for Food and Business (Italian Lexicon for Food Studies) (3 credits)
* Elementary Italian Language (3 credits)
* Intensive Elementary Italian Language (6 credits, minimum of 8 participants)

CRITICAL STUDIES ON FOOD SYSTEMS AND SUSTAINABILITY IN JAPAN
SUMMER 2017
DURATION: 4-week Full Immersion Program
WHEN: July 2 – July 30, 2017
WHERE: Osaka, Japan

COURSES OFFERED
* Critical Studies on Japanese Food Culture (3 credits)
* Food Choice and Politics in Japan (3 credits)

Applications also open for Gustolab International programs in Italy (Rome, South and North Italy). Open enrollment programs are available to students from all universities.
Spring
Summer
Fall
Internship (several positions available!)

 

Johns Hopkins U SAIS Europe Job Ad: International Relations (Italy)

Assistant Professor of International Relations (Tenure-Track)
Johns Hopkins University, SAIS Europe, Bologna, Italy
Closes: 9th March 2017

Founded in 1943 and a Johns Hopkins division since 1950, The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies of the Johns Hopkins University (SAIS) has been educating global leaders for more than 70 years. As a highly selective graduate institution with a distinguished faculty, SAIS consistently ranks as one of the top schools of international relations in the world. SAIS was founded to provide a practical approach to training students in international leadership and foreign relations, and to provide mid-career educational opportunities for those already working in related fields. To learn more about SAIS, visit www.sais-jhu.edu. 

Position:
SAIS is seeking to appoint a full-time, tenure-track, assistant professor in international relations (IR). Candidates who combine their work in international relations with an interest in international security would have an advantage; candidates with an interest in international law, conflict management, international development, or the foreign policy of the United States are also encouraged to apply. Candidates should be able to teach an introductory course in IR theory at the graduate level.

The position is located at the SAIS Europe campus in Bologna, Italy. The goal is to fill the position with an appointment starting on or soon after July 1, 2017. Interviews will be held in Bologna, Italy.

Qualifications:
A Ph.D. awarded by June 2017 will be a condition for employment. The ideal applicant will have strong academic credentials and a commitment to improve public policy. A record of excellence in teaching and publication record would be a distinct advantage.

Application:
Electronic submissions are preferred. A letter of application, curriculum vitae, and the names and contact details for three people who can provide letters of reference should be submitted to: SAISEuropeIRSearch@jhu.edu

Applications will be reviewed beginning February 15, 2017 and will be accepted until a final decision is made. Inquiries may be made to Professor Erik Jones (erik.jones AT jhu.edu).

EIUC Training Seminar for International Electoral Observers 2017 (Italy)

Training seminar for International Electoral Observers

Admissions to the two, three-day, modules (20-22 March 2017 and 23-25 March 2017) of the Training seminar for International Electoral Observers are open until 12 February 2017.

Open and legitimate elections are the indispensable foundation for sustainable development and an effective democracy. Actions supporting the right to participate in genuine elections can play a major role in sustaining peace, security and conflict prevention. Support takes the form of electoral assistance projects and election observation missions. This requires skilled and trained observers.

Target: The two modules are devoted to those applicants with no experience in election observation or to those observers who have participated to a maximum of two missions as short term observers. 

Eligibility: Lectures are conceived for an audience of graduates mainly in Law, Political Sciences, Economics, Sociology, Philosophy, Anthropology or similar who want to address international election observation from a multi-disciplinary approach that will be useful in further engagements on the field. 

Training language: all courses will be held in English. It is, therefore, essential that all participants understand and speak English fluently.

 

U Colorado Denver Study Abroad Italy 2017

Accepting Applications, “Managing across Cultures,” Study Abroad Program in Italy, University of Colorado Denver, Maymester 2017

We are currently accepting applications for our fascinating Study Abroad Program in Italy (deadline February 15, 2017).

We are excited to continue the strong tradition of education abroad studies in Sorrento, Italy.

The program will familiarize students with theory and research methods in the areas of global communication, construction and negotiation of identity, cross-cultural awareness, and a hands-on management with a global mindset. Additionally, the program offers an everyday complimentary Italian class taught by native speakers, fascinating on-site work with unique local craftsmen, entrepreneurs, and business owners, exploration of gastronomic wonders of Italy, excursions to Rome, Pompeii ruins, Mt. Vesuvius, Naples, Amalfi, Ravello, Postiano, and a boat trip to the island of Capri.

This program is facilitated by Julia Khrebtan-Hörhager, who is professor of communication and a former lecturer of Italian and German studies. Her research and teaching interests are in intercultural communication, management with a global mindset, European studies, conflict, transnational feminism, and international cinematography.

Please visit students’ academic blogs as well as our application site to learn more about the program, the requirements, and the steps for application. The review process for applications begins immediately.

Blog 2015

Blog 2014

Application Site