Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue #5

Key Concepts in ICDThe fifth issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. Lists organized  chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

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Leeds-Hurwitz, W. (2014). Intercultural communication. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 5. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2014/03/key-concept-intercultural-comm.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue is publishing a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue. The logic is that different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue #4

Key Concepts in ICDThe fourth issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. Lists organized  chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

Key Concept-CMM

Penman, R. (2014). Coordinated management of meaning. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 4. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2014/02/key-concept-cmm.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue is publishing a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue. The logic is that different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue #3

Key Concepts in ICDThe third issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. Lists organized  chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

Intercultural competence

Arasaratnam, L. (2014). Intercultural competence. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 3. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2014/02/key-concept-intercultural-competence.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue is publishing a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue. The logic is that different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue #2

Key Concepts in ICDThe second issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. Lists organized  chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

CosmopolitanismSobre-Denton, M. (2014). Cosmopolitanism. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 2. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2014/02/key-concept-cosmopolitanism.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue is publishing a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue. The logic is that different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue #1

Key Concepts in ICDYou may have already noticed that the menu bar on the site has a new entry: publications. Starting today, the Center for Intercultural Dialogue is initiating a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue. The logic is that different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. It should be useful to sort out some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. Key Concepts will be made available as PDFs on the CID website and may be downloaded for free. The first few concepts will be intercultural dialogue, cosmopolitanism, intercultural competence, and coordinated management of meaning. As you think of other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide an explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue.

The first key concept described is, for obvious reasons, Intercultural Dialogue. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF.

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NOTE for students: As these will be written by academics, they may be used as resources in academic papers (unless your professor in a particular course tells you otherwise). The citation format in APA would be:

Leeds-Hurwitz, W. (2014). Intercultural dialogue. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 1. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2014/02/key-concept-intercultural-dialogue1.pdf

NOTE: After publishing dozens of key concepts and translations, lists organized chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, have been created, and a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.