One Small Step by StoryCorps

Applied ICDStoryCorps has started a new project, One Small Step, as a tool for encouraging dialogue.

“Over the last 15 years, StoryCorps has perfected a method for helping people feel more connected and for reminding us of the inherent worth of every person and every story. People come together to have otherwise impossible conversations, using our tools and questions. The microphone gives them license to talk about things they otherwise might not discuss.

Now, we are doing something different. We are asking people with different political views to record a StoryCorps interview with each other. Why? To break down boundaries created by politics and remember our shared humanity. To remind us that we have more in common than divides us and that treating those with whom we disagree with decency and respect is essential to a functioning democracy.

With One Small Step, we are seeking to counteract intensifying political divides, by facilitating and recording conversations that enable people who disagree to listen to each other with respect.”

San Francisco State U Job Ad: Conflict Management/Public Dialogue (USA)

Job adsAssistant Professor, Conflict Management and Public Dialogue, Communication Studies Department, San Francisco State University, CA, USA. Deadline: Open until filled, posted Sept 19, 2018.

This tenure-track position begins August 2019. Preference will be given to candidates with dialogue facilitation experience and a demonstrated record of civic and community engagement. The position requires graduate and undergraduate teaching in the areas of: conflict management, dialogue, dialogue facilitation, and mediation theory and practice. Faculty develop and maintain an active scholarship program.

KC8 Public Dialogue Translated into Greek

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#8: Public Dialogue, which Robyn Penman wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Anastasia Karakitsou has now translated into Greek. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC8 Public Dialogue_GreekPenman, R. (2017). Public Dialogue [Greek]. (A. Karakitsou, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 8. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2014/03/key-concept-public-dialogue.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concept #8: Public Dialogue Translated into Persian

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting  KC8: Public Dialogue, written by Robyn Penman in English in 2014, which Ramin Hajian Fard has now translated into Persian. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC8 Public Dialogue_PersianPenman, R. (2017). Public dialogue [Persian]. (R. H. Fard, Trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 8. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2018/08/kc8-public-dialogue_persian-revised.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concept #8 Public Dialogue Translated into Turkish

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting the translation of KC8: Public Dialogue. Robyn Penman wrote this in English in 2014, and it now has been translated into Turkish by Kenan Çetinkaya. Click on the thumbnail of the translation to read it. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC8 Public Dialogue_TurkishPenman, R. (2016). Kamusal Diyalog. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 8. (K. Çetinkaya, Trans.). Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2016/07/kc8-public-dialogue_turkish.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

CFP ESTIDIA: Dialogue as Global Action conference (Romania)

Call for Papers
ESTIDIA (European Society for Transcultural and Interdisciplinary Dialogue)
Dialogue as Global Action: Interacting Voices and Visions across Cultures
25-26 September 2015
Department of Modern Languages for Specific Purposes and Communication Sciences
‘Ovidius’ University, Constanţa, Romania
in partnership with: University of Cyprus, Nicosia; Zayed University, UAE; University of Bucharest, Romania (Faculty of Journalism and Communication Sciences); ISA (International Sociological Association); AISLF (Association Internationale des Sociologue de Langue Française)

Ovidius University (Constanţa, Romania), a modern and vibrant research university on the Black Sea coast, welcomes dialogue-oriented researchers and practitioners to the 3rd ESTIDIA conference, to be held on 25-26 September, 2015. The conference serves as a discussion forum for researchers and practitioners to showcase their dialogue-oriented work on current societal and community-related issues, and on methodological approaches to dialogue analysis. The aim is to bring together senior and junior scholars and practitioners from a wide range of disciplines and professional orientations to critically explore, through dialogue, different perspectives on human thinking, communication strategies, interpersonal relations, socio-cultural traditions, political processes and business interactions by means of theory-based and practice-driven investigations.

Conference Theme
Due to its engaging, emulating and exploratory nature, dialogue is an essential form of human communication, action and interaction. According to Vygotsky (1978), any true understanding is dialogic in nature. As social human beings, we participate in a wide range of dialogues in various contexts and at different levels, in a shared search for increased understanding of issues and phenomena, for questioning ideas and actions, for joint problem-solving. These multi-layered dialogues have dramatically increased with the widespread use of social media, which now enable members of any social, gender, ethnic, racial or cultural group to raise and make their voices heard while articulating current concerns and addressing critical issues of inequality, discrimination, socio-political underrepresentation and misrepresentation. The aim of this conference is to take the local and global dialogue to a higher level by extending its scope and empowering role as a springboard for critical reflection and self-reflection, for in-depth issue problematisation, for multi-voiced interpersonal resonance, for constructive polyphony of intersecting, contradictory and complementary voices. In the Bakhtinian (1981) theoretical tradition, these social voices not only represent the world, they also convey societal norms and moral values. In other words, multiple voices express not only how people see the world, but also how they feel about it.

For a better understanding of how meaning is created through the mechanisms and strategies of dialogue, it is important to investigate how voices are woven in discourse, how themes and voices intermingle in a polyphonic way. One way of understanding the shifting qualities of individual voices as multiple agencies or roles is provided by Goffman’s (1981) concept of participation framework (based on the distinction between author, animator and principal). At the same time, as has been pointed out by Couldry (2010), having a voice is not enough: we need to know that our voice matters, i.e. it has legitimacy. Hence, following Wertsch (1991), we need to realize that in internalizing forms of social interaction, the individual takes on and interrelates with the voices of others, which accounts for the complexity of ‘multivoiced’ dialogues. While joining in a dialogic polyphony of voices, each voice shares a particular experience, viewpoint, or sets of attitudes to reality, all of which are instrumental in shaping actions, interactions and relationships. As a result, dialogue is the locus where different beliefs, commitments, ideologies come into contact and confront each other through the intermediary of intersecting voices.

Authors are invited to present papers on a broad spectrum of research topics (both discipline-specific and multi-disciplinary) that include, but are not restricted to the following:
– Glocal voices in inclusive or exclusive dialogues
– Multiple voices crisscrossing in online dialogue
– Voicing viewpoints in multimodal communication
– Dialogue genres in multi-party interactions (debates, disputes, controversies)
– Voices in dialogue across time and space
– Converging vs. diverging voices in dialogue
– Gendering voices in public and/or private dialogue
– Voices shaping inter-ethnic dialogue
– Voices interacting in cross-cultural dialogue
– Voices that clash, dialogues that break down
– Voices in institutional and non-institutional dialogue
– Inclusive vs. non-inclusive dialogue across cultures and continents
– Public and private voices in sustained dialogue
– Face-to-face and/or virtual trust-building dialogues
– Speaker roles vs. listener roles in dialogic interactions
– Competing and collaborative voices in dialogue
– Legitimizing and delegitimizing voices in dialogue
– Polyphony of voices in harmonious or disharmonious dialogue
– Intertextuality in multi-voiced dialogue

We welcome contributions from diverse fields of enquiry, including linguistics, media studies, journalism, cultural studies, psychology, rhetoric, political science, sociology, pedagogy, philosophy and anthropology.

Keynote speakers
-Prof. Cornelia Ilie, Zayed University, UAE
-Prof. Jonathan Clifton, Université de Valenciennes, France

Thematic Workshops
One thematic workshop has already been set up:
Workshop on “Multiple Visuals, Multiple Visions: Dialogue of signs and sign systems; Multimodality” (presentations in both English and French)
Chair: Prof. Daniela Rovenţa-Frumușani (University of Bucharest, Romania)

Abstract Submission
We invite submissions of abstracts for paper presentations (20 minutes for presentation, to be followed by 10 minutes for questions) to be scheduled in parallel sessions. The abstract should include the name, institutional affiliation and email address of the author(s), the paper title, and four-five keywords. The abstract should be approximately 500 words in length. All abstracts will be peer-reviewed by the conference scientific committee according to the following criteria: originality and/or importance of topic; clarity of research question and purpose; data sources; theoretical approach; analytical focus; relevance of findings if already available.

Workshop Proposal Submissions
In addition to paper presentations, thematic workshops are being planned within the framework of the ESTIDIA 2015 conference. Proposals for workshops are invited. They should cover a topic of relevance to the theme of the conference. Proposals should contain relevant information to enable evaluation on the basis of importance, quality, and expected output. Each workshop should have one or more designated organizers. Proposals should be 1-2 pages long and include at least the following information:
– The workshop topic and goals, their significance, and their appropriateness for ESTIDIA 2015
– The intended audience, including the research areas from which participants may come, the likely number of participants (with some of their names, if known)
– Organizers’ details: a description of the main organizers’ research and publication background in the proposed topic; and complete addresses including webpages of the organizers

Important Dates
– Submission of abstracts      March 29, 2015
– Submission of workshop proposals    April 10, 2015
– Notification of acceptance     April 26, 2015
– Registration (early bird)    July 31, 2015

Email submission to:
Ana Maria Munteanu
Olivia Chirobocea

Registration fee
The early bird registration fee (by 31 July 2015) is 70 EUR, late registration fee (after 31 July 2015) is 80 EUR. The ESTIDIA membership fee (10 EUR) will be paid at the conference venue. The conference fee includes the book of abstracts, the published conference proceedings, a conference bag, a welcome cocktail, refreshments/coffee breaks and a guided sightseeing tour of Constanţa.

Account holder: ‘Ovidius’ University of Constanța
Bank: BCR Sucursala CONSTANȚA, Train, 68, Constanţa, Romania
SWIFT Code: RNCBROBU
IBAN Code:
RO28RNCB0114032053160001/ EUR
RO71RNCB0114032053160003/ USD

Publication procedure
All accepted papers (following editorial review) will be included in the conference proceedings published in International Journal of Cross-cultural Studies and Environmental Communication (ISSN 2285 – 3324). Authors of selected high quality papers will be invited to submit their papers for publication in Special Issues and regular issues of relevant high-impact international academic journals.

Robyn Penman Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesRobyn Penman (PhD, University of Melbourne) is an independent communication scholar and consultant to government on communication and social policy matters.

Robyn Penman

She was a Founding Director of the Communication Research Institute of Australia (1987-2000) and an Adjunct Professor in Communication at the University of Canberra (1999-2005). Robyn is a past President (1985-6) and Life Member of the Australian and New Zealand Communication Association, has served on the International Communication Association board (2002-3) and is a Visiting Senior Member, Linacre College, Oxford (1987-). She was also the associate editor of the Australian Journal of Communication (1984-2003) and has served on the editorial boards of Communication Theory and Human Communication Research.

Robyn has devoted her scholarly career to the development of a practical-theoretic approach to understanding communication as a relational practice. Her practical-theoretic work began with her PhD thesis, published as Communication processes and relationship (1980, Academic Press) and continued with her later book on Reconstructing communicating: Looking to a future (2000, Lawrence Erlbaum). More recently she has argued for a communication discipline that treats the practice of communicating as its central focus in “On taking communication seriously” (Australian Journal of Communication, 2012, 39(3), 41-64).

Robyn has focused on explicating an account of how we can make sense of the practice of communicating, while still in the process of communicating, and how we can make judgments about the quality of those practices, while also still in communicating. (eg. “Good theory and good practice: An argument in progress”. Communication Theory, 1992, 2, 234-250). She uses dialogue as an exemplar form of good communicating and has engaged in a range of practical research endeavours to demonstrate the usefulness of her approach and its relevance to important public issues.

She has written on public dialogue (eg. “Voices of the Cupertino community, as heard and reflected upon”. In S. Spano (Ed.) 2001. Public dialogue and participatory democracy: The Cupertino community project. Hampton Press) and the importance of dissent (“Making a place for the practice of dissenting”. In S. Banks (Ed.) 2008. Dissent and the failure of leadership. Edward Elgar Publishing). She has also engaged in an extended research program on communicating in courts and its implications for procedural justice (eg “Goals, games & moral orders: A paradoxical case in court?” In K. Tracy (Ed). 1991. Understanding face-to-face interaction. Lawrence Erlbaum).

In another practical research endeavour, Robyn has successfully demonstrated how an understanding of dialogue as an exemplar form of good communicating is of direct value in better information design practices, especially as applied to the written word (eg “Conversation is the common theme: Understanding talk and text”. Australian Journal of Communication, 1993, 20, 30–43; and R. Penman & D. Sless. (Eds). 1992. Designing information for people. Communication Research Press).

Robyn’s current interests include an inquiry into good communicating in relation to new media and participative democracy. The background for this can be found in her chapter “On being present and participating: Projecting into 21st century media life (In S. Littlejohn & S McNamee (Eds). 2014. The Coordinated Management of Meaning: A festschrift in honor of W. Barnett Pearce. Farleigh Dickson University Press/Rowman & Littlefield). She also continues her broader interest in exploring the quality of communicating in other aspects of public life.

Robyn welcomes contact via email.

Key Concepts #8: Public Dialogue

Key Concepts in ICDThe eighth issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. Lists organized  chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC8-sm

Penman, R. (2014). Public dialogue. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 8. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2014/03/key-concept-public-dialogue.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue is publishing a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue. The logic is that different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


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Public Dialogue and Deliberation

A message from Rebecca Townsend, on behalf of a group of scholars named below:

“We welcome members of the National Communication Association (NCA) to consider supporting the creation of a Public Dialogue and Deliberation Division. Should you support , please attach your name to this petition. A full rationale for this proposed division is available, but a brief version follows.

The discipline of communication is poised to become more than a de facto leader in scholarship on dialogue and deliberation. Creating the NCA Public Dialogue and Deliberation division would significantly advance that effort and not only bring together communication scholars but also attract others toward our discipline. We identify three principal reasons for forming the division.

(1) Many dialogue and deliberation scholars who belong to NCA produce innovative work that spans the different sub-fields within our discipline but doesn’t fit well in any single division. A new division would welcome all such scholarship and better feature the best scholarship on dialogue and deliberation in the conference program, jointly sponsoring panels with other divisions as appropriate.

(2) The lack of a division substantially reduces the opportunity for cross-pollination and collaboration among the diverse scholars who study dialogue and deliberation. Within this new division, those with a more pedagogical focus and those engaged in community interventions, in particular, may find more opportunities to meet and interact with those doing humanistic and social scientific research.

(3) Many of those who study dialogue and deliberation seek a qualitatively different style of conference session. The conventional presentation of papers, with a respondent and brief Q&A, rarely permits dialogic exchange or deliberative analysis, but the new division would offer the freedom to explore alternative ways of meeting together.

Thank you for your consideration and possible support!”

Rebecca M. Townsend, Manchester Community College, on behalf of proposal drafting committee, including:

Laura Black, Ohio University
Martín Carcasson, Colorado State University
John Gastil, Penn State University
William Keith, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Windy Lawrence, University of Houston
Leah Sprain, University of Colorado Boulder
Tim Steffensmeier, Kansas State University

Texas A & M University job ad

Texas A&M University, Department of Communication

The Department of Communication at TAMU invites applications for a tenured position at the Associate or Full Professor level in Civic Dialogue and Leadership starting September 1, 2012.  All methodological and theoretical orientations are acceptable so long as the scholarship focuses on the interrelationships among civic discourse, leadership, and democratic practice.  Possible areas of expertise include: political communication and the interrelationships of democratic government, elections, and new media; argumentation and advocacy in the public sphere; social movements; public dialogue, public deliberation, and participatory democracy; public discourse and conflict management; intergroup dialogues regarding diversity, ethnicity, race, and gender; difference, dialogue, and multiculturalism, organizational communication and workplace representation; formal and informal leadership practices and workplace democracy; corporate social responsibility; communication technologies, web 2.0, and political campaigns; the role of new media technologies in civic and/or political dialogues; and community dialogues around health.

To receive fullest consideration, applicants should apply by November 1, 2011, but applications will continue to be accepted until the position is filled.  Interested candidates should mail a letter of application, curriculum vitae, and three letters of reference to J. Kevin Barge (kbarge@tamu.edu).   Chair of Committee, Department of Communication, 4234 TAMU, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4234. Phone: (979) 845-5500; FAX: (979) 845-6594 (emailed applications will not be accepted).

The department offers the PhD, MA, and BA degrees. It has 21 tenure-track faculty members, 60 graduate students, and 1000 undergraduate majors. Texas A&M is the fourth largest university in the United States. The student body includes 23% African American, Hispanic, Asian or Pacific Islander, and American Indian or Alaskan Native students and over 4300 international students from 126 countries. It ranks among the highest nationally in number of national merit scholars, total research expenditures, and total endowment funds. Texas A&M University is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer, is deeply committed to diversity, and responds to the needs of dual-career couples.