KC19 Multiculturalism Translated into Greek

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#19: Multiculturalism, which Polina Golovátina-Mora and Raúl Alberto Mora wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Anastasia Karakitsou  has now translated into Greek. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC19 Multiculturalism_GreekGolovátina-Mora, P., & Mora, R. A. (2018). Multiculturalism (Greek). (A. Karakitsou, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 19. Retrieved from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2018/03/kc19-multiculturalism_greek.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concept #19: Multiculturalism Translated into Spanish

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting  KC19: Multiculturalism, written by Polina Golovátina-Mora and Raúl Alberto Mora and first published in English in 2014, and which Gloria Gutiérrez has now translated into Spanish. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC19 Multiculturalism_SpanishGolovátina-Mora, P., & Mora, R. A. (2016). Multiculturalismo. (G. Gutiérrez trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 19. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2016/10/kc19-multiculturalism_spanish.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concept #45: Testimonio by Raúl Alberto Mora

Key Concepts in ICDThe next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. Lists organized  chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

kc45-sm

Mora, R. A. (2015). Testimonio. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 45. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/kc45-testimonio.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept. Feel free to propose terms in any language, especially if they expand our ability to discuss an aspect of intercultural dialogue that is not easy to translate into English.


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concept #42: Conscientização by Raúl Alberto Mora

Key Concepts in ICDThe next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available, providing another word in a language other than English. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. Lists organized  chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

kc42-sm

Mora, R. A. (2014). Conscientização. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 42. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2014/11/key-concepts-conscientizaccca7acc83o.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept. And starting today, feel free to propose terms in any language, especially if they expand our ability to discuss an aspect of intercultural dialogue that is not easy to translate into English.


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concept #36: Counter-narrative by Raúl A. Mora

Key Concepts in ICDThe next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. Lists organized  chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC36-sm

Mora, R. A. (2014). Counter-narrative. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 36. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2014/10/key-concept-counter-narrative.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concept #21: Reflexivity

Key Concepts in ICDThe next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. Lists organized  chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

kc21-sm

Mora, R. A. (2014). Reflexivity. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 21. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2014/06/key-concept-reflexivity.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concept #19: Multiculturalism

Key Concepts in ICDThe next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. Lists organized  chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

kc19-smGolovátina-Mora, P., & Mora, R. A.  (2014). Multiculturalism. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 19. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2014/06/key-concept-multiculturalism.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concepts #13: Language Ecology

Key Concepts in ICDThe next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. Lists organized  chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

kc13-sm

Mora, R. A. (2014). Language ecology. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 13. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2014/05/key-concept-language-ecology.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Raúl A. Mora Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesDr. Raúl Alberto Mora is at present an Assistant Professor in the School Education and Pedagogy Graduate Program at Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana (UPB), in Medellín, Colombiam where he also coordinates the MA in Learning and Teaching Processes in Second Languages (ML2).

Raul Alberto Mora Velez

He is also a faculty affiliate at the PhD in Social Sciences at UPB and the PhD in Education at Universidad Distrital in Bogotá. Dr. Mora’s current teaching duties include preservice language courses and graduate-level seminars on research and literacies in second language contexts. He holds a PhD in Language and Literacy and an MA in Teacher Education, both from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He was a Fulbright Scholar and belongs to the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi.

He has written peer-reviewed articles and book chapters on issues of language teaching, literacy, and qualitative research. He has presented conference papers (both on site and virtually) and has participated as plenary speaker in Colombia, Argentina, Spain, India, Vietnam, the United States, and Russia. In addition, he has been a guest lecturer at different universities in Colombia and Spain. He is at present an Editorial Board member for the Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, where he also serves as Editor for the Advocacy/Policy Department section. Other editorial duties include the International Review Board for the HETL Review and the Editorial Boards for PROFILE and HOW Journals in Colombia. Dr. Mora also sits on the Advisory Committee for the Colombian Fulbright Commission and has been an educational adviser for the Colombian Ministry of Education.

His research work features membership in the Language and Culture Research Group at UPB and the Teacher Education Research Group at Universidad Distrital. He also chairs the Student Research Group on Second Language (SRG-L2) at UPB. A qualitative researcher by choice and training, he has specialized in the education of novice researchers at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Most of his research includes ethnographic approaches and action research, interspersed with elements of case study research, narrative inquiry, and discourse analysis.

His current research agenda covers the fields of alternative literacies, critical discourse analysis, world languages, socio-cultural theory, and issues of bilingualism and multiculturalism. His research on literacies include the analysis of English literacies in urban spaces of Medellín, Colombia, the description of English literacies in virtual gaming communities in the city, and the development of frameworks to discuss the evolution of the notion of literacy in languages other than English. His work on world languages includes the development of conceptual frameworks that defy the traditional binary of second/foreign language and respond to the language ecologies present in today’s world. Recent studies on critical discourse have analyzed the social imaginaries of teachers in advertisements for online courses and the idea of the trickster in Colombian comedy. His most recent work on Socio-cultural theory has analyzed media and the situation of teacher education in Colombia through the use of Pierre Bourdieu’s social frameworks. Finally, his work on bilingualism and multiculturalism (most of it in tandem with his wife, Dr. Polina Golovátina-Mora) intends to look at the multiple dimensions of bilingualism to give it a stronger social dimension.

You can check Dr. Mora’s website for more details about his academic interests, teaching, and research endeavors, as well as his Academia.edu profile.