CID Poster #6: Dialogue Defined

CID PostersThis is the next of the posters designed by Linda J. de Wit, in her role as CID intern. For this poster, you literally have to look from a different perspective to read the quote; the picture of birds on a wire also represents taking different perspectives. The source of the quote is:

Leeds-Hurwitz, W. (2016). De la possession des compétences interculturelles au dialogue interculturel: Un cadre conceptuel [Moving from having intercultural competencies to constructing intercultural dialogues: A conceptual framework]. Les Politiques Sociales, 3/4, 7-22.

DialogueJust in case anyone wants to cite this poster, the following would be the recommended format:

Center for Intercultural Dialogue. (2017). Communication as culture definition. CID Posters, 6. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/08/dialogue.png

As with other series, if you wish to contribute an original contribution, please send an email before starting any work to receive approval, to minimize inadvertent duplication, and to learn about technical requirements. As is the case with other CID Publications, posters should be created initially in English. Given that translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue have received so many views, anyone who wishes to translate their own poster into another language (or two) is invited to provide that as well. If you want to volunteer to translate someone else’s poster into a language in which you are fluent, send in a note before starting, to receive approval and to confirm no one else is working on the same one.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com


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CFP International Association for Dialogue Analysis 2017 (Bologna)

The 2017 International Association for Dialogue Analysis (IADA) conference will be held from October 11-14, 2017 at the University of Bologna (Department of Education) and is sponsored by the School of Psychology and Education, the FAM (Fondazione Alma Mater), and the International Association for Dialogue Analysis.

The conference focuses on the role of dialogue or interaction in displaying, maintaining, creating yet also defying the crucial dimensions of the world we live in. This process is particularly at play – although not necessarily noticed – in everyday life. Rather than a context, this phenomenological notion indicates the obvious, routine, quasi-natural quality of most human practices taking place in ordinary as well as institutional contexts. Quoting a well-known formula by John Heritage (1984) yet applying it beyond the micro-level of the hic et nunc discursive environment, we propose to conceive dialogue as “context shaped and context renewing.” Overcoming the “interactional reductionism” (Levinson, 2005) implied in focusing solely on the emergent properties of language use, as well as any simplistic return to sociocultural, psychological an even material determinism, dialogue and interaction are seen as an “intermediate variable” (Ibidem) or faits d’interface (Descola, 2016) connecting the micro-order of everyday life and the macro-order of shared culture and social structure. As Rommetveit put it forty years ago, dialogue is “the skeleton” or “the architecture of intersubjectivity” (1976).

The conference welcomes empirical and methodological papers from different disciplinary perspectives that focus on dialogue and interaction as carriers of, and tools for culture, social organization, moral horizons, identities and change. Theoretical papers are more than welcome insofar as they provide some empirical illustration of the paper’s theoretical point(s). The conference includes but it is not limited to, the following subthemes:

* Dialogue and Health (e.g. dialogue as therapy; dialogue in clinical settings; medical interaction; dialogue in multilingual-multicultural healthcare contexts; dialogue in social work).

* Dialogue, Justice and Social Change  (e.g. dialogue in policing including interrogations, citizen calls; criminal, civil and administrative law; transidioma and  asylum; intercultural institutional talk; social conflicts and Alternative Dispute Resolution practices; family and social mediation; restorative justice).

* Dialogue and Materiality (e.g. inter-objectivity; Actor-Network-Theory; things as dialogic entities; humans and non-humans interaction; socio-semiotics; dialogue and technologically saturated environment; the object’s affordances and the user’s agenda).

* Dialogue and Organization (e.g. dialogue as an organizing phenomenon; leadership and dialogue; expertnovice interaction; authority and power in organizational communication).

* Dialogue, Socialization and Education (e.g. dialogue in friendship and peer culture; family everyday talk; language socialization; classroom talk; dialogue in everyday school-life; assessment as a dialogic practice; teachers-parents conference; L2 learning activities; coaching and training).

* Dialogue, Text and Language (e.g. dialogue as text; dialogue in literary texts, CMC and audiovisual texts; text and reader dialogue; textual representations of dialogues; dialogue in advertising, advertising as dialogue; dialogue in propaganda and political speech; grammar, lexicon and cultural norms in everyday talk).

Deadline: 30 November 2016.

We invite extended abstracts (500 to 700 words) or full papers of a maximum of 30 pages, including references. Any citation style is permitted (e.g., MLA, APA, Chicago).  Submission opens on June 30th 2016, and closes on November 30th 2016 at 23:59 local time in Italy. Notification of acceptance in March 2017.

For details and instructions see the conference website page:  https://eventi.unibo.it/international-conference-iada-bologna2017/submission

Scientific organization Letizia Caronia (Dipartimento di Scienze dell’Educazione, Università di Bologna) Marzia Saglietti, Ph.D (Dipartimento di Scienze dell’Educazione, Università di Bologna)

Contacts:  For any inquiry concerning the extended abstract/paper submission please contact:  paper.iadaconference2017@unibo.it

For any inquiry concerning the conference organization please contact:  info.iadaconference2017@unibo.it

CFP Int’l Association for Dialogue Analysis 2017 (Italy)

The 2017 International Association for Dialogue Analysis (IADA) conference will be held from October 11th-14th, 2017 at the University of Bologna (Department of Education) and is sponsored by the School of Psychology and Education, the FAM (Fondazione Alma Mater), and the International Association for Dialogue Analysis.

The conference focuses on the role of dialogue or interaction in displaying, maintaining, creating yet also defying the crucial dimensions of the world we live in. This process is particularly at play – although not necessarily noticed – in everyday life. Rather than a context, this phenomenological notion indicates the obvious, routine, quasi-natural quality of most human practices taking place in ordinary as well as institutional contexts. Quoting a well known formula by John Heritage (1984) yet applying it beyond the micro-level of the hic et nunc discursive environment, we propose to conceive dialogue as “context shaped and context renewing”. Overcoming the “interactional reductionism” (Levinson, 2005) implied in focusing solely on the emergent properties of language use, as well as any simplistic return to sociocultural, psychological an even material determinism, dialogue and interaction are seen as an “intermediate variable” (Ibidem) or faits d’interface (Descola, 2016) connecting the micro-order of everyday life and the macro-order of shared culture and social structure. As Rommetveit put it forty years ago, dialogue is “the skeleton” or “the architecture of intersubjectivity” (1976).

The 2017 International Association for Dialogue Analysis conference (Bologna, October 11th-14th, 2017) welcomes empirical and methodological extended abstracts and full papers from different disciplinary perspectives that focus on dialogue and interaction as carriers of, and tools for culture, social organization, moral horizons, identities and change.

The notion of action is at the core of the conference main theme: the contributors are asked to focus on dialogue and social interaction as –  at the same time – presupposing  and producing the crucial dimensions of the world we live in.

Theoretical papers are more than welcome insofar as they provide some empirical illustration of the paper’s theoretical point(s).

The conference includes but it is not limited to, the following subthemes:
Dialogue and Health (e.g. dialogue as therapy; dialogue in clinical settings; medical interaction; dialogue in multilingual-multicultural healthcare contexts; dialogue in social work).
Dialogue, Justice and Social Change  (e.g.; dialogue in policing including interrogation, citizen calls; criminal, civil and administrative law; transidioma and  asylum; intercultural institutional talk; social conflicts and Alternative Dispute Resolution practices; family and social mediation; restorative justice).
Dialogue and Materiality (e.g. inter-objectivity; Actor-Network-Theory; things as dialogic entities; humans and non-humans interaction; sociosemiotics; dialogue and technologically saturated environment; the object’s affordances and the user’s agenda).
Dialogue and Organization (e.g. dialogue as an organizing phenomenon; leadership and dialogue; expert-novice interaction; authority and power in organizational communication).
Dialogue, Socialization and Education (e.g. dialogue in friendship and peer culture; family everyday talk; language socialization; classroom talk; dialogue in everyday school-life; assessment as a dialogic practice; teachers-parents conference; L2 learning activities; coaching and training).
Dialogue, Text and Language (e.g. dialogue as text; dialogue in literary texts, CMC and audiovisual texts; text and reader dialogue; textual representations of dialogues; dialogue in advertising, advertising as dialogue; dialogue in propaganda and political speech; grammar, lexicon and cultural norms in everyday talk).We invite extended abstracts (500 to 700 words) or full papers of a maximum of 30 pages, including references. Any citation style is permitted (e.g., MLA, APA, Chicago).

Submission opens on June 30th, 2016, and closes on November 30th, 2016 at 23:59 local time in Italy. Notification of acceptance in March 2017.

For details and instructions see the Submission page: https://eventi.unibo.it/international-conference-iada-bologna2017/submission

We look forward to your contributions!

Int’l Conference on Conflict Mitigation, Dialogue & Reconciliation in Syria (Lebanon)

Call for Papers and Participation

International Conference on Conflict Mitigation, Dialogue, and Reconciliation in Syria
17-18 November 2016, Beirut – Lebanon

The Institute for Social Justice and Conflict Resolution (ISJCR) at the Lebanese American University (LAU) in collaboration with the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) and King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz International Centre for Interreligious and Intercultural Dialogue (KAICIID) are organizing a two-day peer-reviewed conference at the Lebanese American University – Beirut to address conflict mitigation, dialogue, and reconciliation strategies in Syria. The conference aims to map comparative models in identity-conflict societies with a particular attention given to  power sharing arrangements, local initiatives, and the role of non-state actors and religious leadership. Innovative approaches to conflict mitigation and peace-building through dialogue, deliberation, education, mediation, reparations, and transitional justice within the Syrian context are of primary interest.

We welcome papers that focus on the conceptual as well as comparative practical framework of successful reconciliation strategies applicable to Syria.  Papers and presentations that address the role of religious and local leaders, institutions, Faith Based Organizations (FBOs) in promoting reconciliation are highly encouraged. Demonstration of reconciliation experiences from the region that showcase initiatives taken by local leaders, including tribal and civic in promoting reconciliation are also encouraged to participate.  Presentations will be recorded for social media broadcasting purposes. Selected papers and documented practices will be published in a special volume.

To participate
Please submit a short abstract  along your  institutional affiliation, short bio, and contact information to peer review committee: isjcr[at]lau.edu.lb by June 30 , 2016*.  Showcases and full paper submission deadline is September 15, 2016.  There are limited travel grants available by USIP and KAICIID, please express your interest  to receive travel fund when submitting your abstract. There are no conference registration fees.

*The Institute for Social Justice and Conflict Resolution would like to bring to your attention that the deadline to submit paper abstract for the Syria Conference has been extended until July 30, 2016.

Preliminary Conference Schedule

Thursday, 17 November 2016
1. Keynote Speaker by KAICIID
2. Session I: Challenges to conflict mitigation and reconciliation in divided Society and Syria
3. Session II: Role of religious leaders in reconciliation (Moderated by KAICID)
4. Lunch
5. Session III: Dialogue as a strategy in reconciliation (Moderated by KAICIID)
6. Policy Resolutions and Recommendations I

Friday, 18 November 2016
7. Keynote Speaker by USIP
8. Session IV: Comparative reconciliation strategies in divided society and Syria
9. Session V: Showcases of Local Reconciliation Initiatives (Moderated by USIP)
10. Lunch
11. Session VI: Peace Building through moderation and power sharing (Moderated by USIP)
12. Policy Resolutions and Recommendations II

For additional information, please contact:
Lebanese American University
Institute for Social Justice and Conflict Resolution
P.O. Box 13-5053 Chouran
Beirut, Lebanon 2801
Phone Number: +961 1 786456; Ext: 1494
Fax number +961-1-867-098.
email: isjcr[at]lau.edu.lb

Or, you can directly email the institute director, Dr. Imad Salamey: imad.salamey[at]lau.edu. lb

Cal State U Monterey Bay job ad: Comm Ethics & Practical Reasoning

Assistant Professor of Communication Ethics and Practical Reasoning
California State University Monterey Bay

RESPONSIBILITIES
Teach innovative lower and upper division courses in communication ethics, dialogue and deliberation, philosophical analysis, applied ethics, cooperative argumentation, and related coursework. Sustain innovative scholarly research, publication, and professional service. Apply new scholarship and pedagogies to teaching. Serve on Department, Division, College, and University-wide committees. Provide support for one or more departmental programs, and contribute to reciprocal community partnerships.

QUALIFICATIONS (MINIMUM)
Earned doctorate in philosophy, communication studies, rhetoric, religious studies, or allied discipline. Ability to provide leadership in practical and professional ethics. Ability to teach effectively in a wide range of courses including, but not limited to communication ethics, applied ethics, and deliberation. Ability to assist with innovative interdisciplinary program development. Ability to teach and mentor students from nontraditional, working class, and diverse ethnic and racial backgrounds. Experience working effectively in an ethnically and culturally diverse campus community.

QUALIFICATIONS (DESIRABLE)
Ability or potential in one or more of the following areas:
– Interdisciplinary teaching in leadership studies, religious studies, theology, or spirituality studies
– Application of new media technologies in teaching.
– Innovative teaching and assessment models
– Furthering relationships with the diverse communities of the Monterey Bay and tri-county region
– Proficiency in a second language
– Service learning pedagogy

SCREENING BEGINS: 11/1/2014

APPOINTMENT DATE: Fall 2015

APPLY: All prospective applicants must apply on-line.

CFP Communicating Prejudice

Call for Chapters for Edited Book
Communicating Prejudice: An Appreciative Inquiry Approach
Proposal Submission Deadline:  October 10, 2014
Editors: Camara, S. K., Drummond, D. K., & Hoey, D. M.
Publisher: Nova Publishing, Inc.

Objective:
In the conclusion of his edited book Communicating Prejudice, Michael Hecht called for an intellectual movement beyond understanding prejudice and its personal and social effects on individuals to a more proactive approach that inquires about appreciation as a serious subject of investigation.

Our edited book, Communicating Prejudice: An Appreciative Inquiry Approach, will blend direct unsettling lived experiences with a deep exploration of appreciation, respect and empowerment. We seek contributions which will speak boldly about personal experiences with prejudice with reflections on practical emancipatory frameworks that generate new directions and tools for dialogue. These meta-narratives should display the potential for creating opportunities for inclusivity, transformation, growth and social justice. We hope to draw on key concepts from a variety of disciplines, including Communication, Sociology, Education, Psychology, and Gender Studies.

Recommended topics include, but are not limited to, the following:
*Meta-analyses of Prejudice: Pre and Post racial America
*Autoethnographic Accounts of Prejudice and Transformation
*Examining Historical and Present initiatives to reduce prejudice
*Exploring Varying Contexts of Prejudice (e.g., Gender, Sexual Orientation, Race, Disability)
*Approaches to Appreciative Structures and Prejudicial Experiences
*Theoretical insights to opening dialogue with others
*Fostering appreciative conversations to defeat exclusion
*Co-creating Business and Organizational transformation
*Dealing with difficult situations and reframing conflict
*Contributions to Social Justice

Submission Procedure:
To have an original chapter considered for inclusion in this peer-reviewed volume, submit it with a 100-word abstract. Please include a separate title page with the author(s) and complete contact information, with brief author bio(s) to the editors by October 10, 2014. Indicate in your email cover letter which of the aforementioned topics your chapter best fits. Quantitative and qualitative research articles are limited to a maximum of 25 pages of text excluding references. Personal narratives or essays are limited to 10 pages.

Important Dates:
October 10, 2014– Chapter Submission Deadline
January 15 1, 2015- Notification of Acceptance
June 1, 2015– Chapter Feedback to Authors
October 15, 2015– Final Edited Submission Due

Key Concepts #14: Dialogue

The next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. Lists organized  chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

kc14-smStewart, J. (2014). Dialogue. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 14. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2014/05/key-concept-dialogue.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


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John Stewart Researcher Profile

John StewartJohn Stewart serves as Special Assistant to the President at the University of Dubuque in Dubuque, Iowa. He was Vice President for Academic Affairs at UD from 2001-2010, and on the Communication faculty at the University of Washington in Seattle from 1969-2001. He also taught full-time at the University of Wisconsin-Stout and filled visiting professor/ lecturer positions at a number of institutions, including the University of Hawaii-Manoa, Texas A&M, Gonzaga, California State University-Fresno, Wake Forest, Hebrew University, and the Universities of Tel Aviv and Haifa.

John’s primary research interests have been the philosophy of language, the philosophy and practice of dialogue, and the philosophy and practice of interpretive research. He articulated a relational view of language in Language as Articulate Contact: Toward a Post-Semiotic Philosophy of Communication (1995) and the edited volume, Beyond the Symbol Model: Reflections on the Representational Nature of Language (1996), both published by SUNY Press. His approach to dialogue has been developed in several articles and chapters, including “Foundations of Dialogic Communication,” Quarterly Journal of Speech, 65 (1978), 183-201; “Dialogue as Tensional, Ethical Practice,” with Karen Zediker, Southern Communication Journal, 65 (2000), 224-242; and “Relationships Among Philosophies of dialogue,” with K. E. Zediker and L. L. Black, in Dialogic Approaches to Communication, R. Anderson, L. A. Baxter, & K. N. Cissna (Eds.) (Sage, 2003).

John’s edited textbook, Bridges Not Walls: A Book About Interpersonal Communication is currently in its 11th edition with McGraw Hill, and his co-authored Together: Communicating Interpersonally is in its 6th edition with Oxford.

He is currently focused on revising his communication self-help book, U&ME: Communicating in Moments that Matter (Taos Institute Publications, 2013), which is available in print and e-book versions. Excerpts from, and news about U&ME are available on its Facebook site, and John’s biography, interpersonal communication blog, and information about his other publications are can be found at www.johnstewart.org.

Building bridges from theory to practice

I’m currently teaching a course on communication theory.  It’s an undergraduate class, one of those that’s designed to recruit majors.  Recently, one of my students, Joel, raised his hand in class.  You know the type:  he’s talkative, friendly and bright, a bit overbearing, and trying to figure out ‘what does it all mean’.  And that is precisely what he asked in the middle of a lecture/discussion on the importance of communication theory:  “But Miriam, what’s the point?  How does this stuff work in the real world?  Why should I care?”

It’s an age-old question, and one that students and teachers alike often struggle with, particularly in the social sciences and the humanities:  what is the connection between abstract, above-the-clouds theory and the pragmatic, day-to-day life we lead in the world?  But the question is, really, neither mundane nor naïve.  Indeed, I would argue that, in intercultural communication, this question is particularly important and yet woefully under-addressed.  We come up with all of these amazing theories to describe alienation, assimilation, identity processes, cultural difference—but we publish them in reputable journals and exorbitantly-priced textbooks and provide ‘in real life’ examples primarily at the undergraduate level.  Meanwhile, interculturalists who work in the world (outside of academic research), in such areas as refugee counseling, immigration, study abroad, international business, etc., are often working with little-to-no theoretical training, or with outdated approaches to difference such as the U-Curve or Iceberg models.

Where is the dialogue between theorists and practitioners?  What’s the point of doing such great and important work, on theories such as cosmopolitanism, hybridity, critical race theory, and others, if they are only accessible to other academics?  Those of us who identify as critical intercultural scholars are constantly talking about teaching others that difference should be embraced rather than feared, and yet here we are, talking in a language that is only accessible (literally, in terms of access to academic articles; and figuratively, in terms of being able to translate the academese we learn in graduate school) to a small portion of the population: those most like us.

In a discussion of intercultural dialogue, we would do well to listen to questions like Joel’s—the “how does this work” and “why should I care” questions.  If we are the idealists that the field really demands, then shouldn’t we be taking our work outside of the academy and applying it to those who need it, such as those who work with migrant populations, underserved urban youth, patients without health insurance, and on and on?  How can we build bridges between the important work that is done by university researchers and the communities we intend to serve?

I don’t propose that we stop building intercultural theory.  I think the work we do in intercultural research, particularly with today’s critical and postcolonial turns, is imperative to thriving in a world in which difference is coming closer to our doors rather than farther away.  However, with this divide between town and gown, between theory and practice, particularly in intercultural communication research, too much is lost in the translation.  I’d like to call for creative ways of applying academic theory to real world contexts, in ways that get our students jazzed about life beyond college, to see futures for their intercultural understandings of the world they learn in the classroom.  Programs such as Dr. Amy Stornaiuolo’s work with adolescent literacy, called Space2cre8, are heeding such calls, but there is room for so much more.  Students like Joel, those who understand that there could be more to theory than just memorization and regurgitation on an exam, can start to build these bridges, but only once we realize that our work needs to go further.  Let’s get this conversation moving outward, starting by answering Joel’s question:  “You should care because this work is essential to living in a multicultural world.”  This is the opening of our dialogue.

————————————————————–
Miriam S. Sobre-Denton
Assistant Professor | Intercultural Communication
Southern Illinois University Carbondale

msd

Transformative Power of Dialogue

Review of:
Stephen W. Littlejohn & Sheila McNamee (Eds.). (2014). The coordinated management of meaning: A festschrift in honor of W. Barnett Pearce. Madison, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press.

by Robyn Penman

In 1980, Barnett Pearce and his colleague, Vern Cronen, published Communication, Action and Meaning, a seminal work introducing scholars to the theory of the coordinated management of meaning (CMM). Over the ensuing decades, CMM theory has continued to grow, reaching a wider and wider audience as the practical and theoretical relevance of Barnett’s work became increasingly acknowledged.

In recognition of Barnett’s outstanding scholarship, a conference, entitled the Transformative Power of Dialogue, was held in his honour in January 2011. The essays in this book collection emerged from that conference. I am one of the contributors to this volume and, as such, this review is more of a commendation than any conventional critical review.

The book opens with an essay written by Barnett shortly before his death, reflecting on what it could take for personal and social revolution to be brought about. As he put it, he has “bet my professional life” on following the risky, high stake path that this evolution “could be promoted by explicit attention to what we are making together in the forms of communication in which we engage” (p. 44).

Barnett’s bet has reaped its rewards, not the least of which is the extent to which he has inspired, encouraged and collaborated with an extraordinary range of scholars and practitioners, a sample of which is contained in the current volume. The very breadth, scholarship and wide-ranging practical import captured in the 15 essays bear witness to the rich offerings to be found in CMM and its broader communication perspective.

For those interested in intercultural dialogue, the central importance placed on dialogue in Barnett’s work, and in the essays in this volume, makes the book especially pertinent. One part of this volume is specifically devoted to the theme of dialogue. The topics include the role of systemic questioning (Victoria Chen), moral conflict and managing difference (Stephen Littlejohn), framing and conflict transformation (Linda Putnam), and generative community dialogue (Stanley Deetz).

Dialogue also emerges as a powerful theme throughout the other parts in the book. For example, I (Penman) consider the core relationship between dialogue and presence and what this means for understanding participation in mediated life. John Lannamann explores the key role of dialogue and its practice in cosmopolitan communication in making better social worlds. And Kim Pearce sums up the volume by talking about the pathway to personal and social evolution in terms of the “life of dialogue…that holds in tension, and compassion, the various stories, actions and people who loves us, or don’t, who are like us. . . . , or aren’t and who may challenge us to the core to remain civil and open” (p. 328).

For anyone interested in dialogue and its role in making better social worlds, this book should be a rewarding read.