KC94 Cross-Cultural Kids Translated into Indonesian

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#94: Cross-Cultural Kids, by Ruth E. Van Reken, published in English earlier this year, and which Anastasia Aldelina Lijadi has now translated into Indonesian.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC94 CCK_IndonesianVan Reken, R. (2019). Taruna Lintas Budaya (A. A. Lijadi, Trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 94. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/kc94-cck-indonesian.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Save

Save

KC12 Third Culture Kids Translated into German

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#12: Third Culture Kids, which Anastasia Lijadi published in English in 2014, and which Alina Timofte has now translated into German. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. Lists organized chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC12 Third Culture Kids_GermanLijadi, A. A. (2019). Drittkulturkinder (DKK). (A. Timofte, trans.) Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 12. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2019/04/kc12-third-culture-kids_german-1.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

KC12 Third Culture Kids Translated into Greek

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#12: Third Culture Kids, which Anastasia Aldelina Lijadi wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Rania Spiridakou has now translated into Greek. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC12 TCK_GreekLijadi, A. A. (2017). Third Culture Kids [Greek]. (R. Spiridakou, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 12. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/10/kc12-tck_greek.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

KC12: Third Culture Kids Translated into Spanish

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#12: Third Culture Kids, which Anastasia Aldelina Lijadi wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Sofia Ruth Nazir Nazir has now translated into Spanish. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC12 Third Culture Kids_SpanishLijadi, A. A. (2017). Niños de la Tercera Cultura. (S. R. N. Nazir, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 12. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/08/kc12-third-culture-kids_spanish.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concept #12: Third Culture Kids Translated into Indonesian

Key Concepts in ICDAs described a week ago, some of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue are being translated into other languages than English. I sent a note around to all those who wrote these up originally, and over the past week have heard back from more than half the group already, and have several drafts nearly ready to post. Today I am posting the translation of KC12: Third Culture Kids (TCKs), originally written in English in 2014, and now translated into Indonesian, by Anastasia Aldelina Lijadi, of the University of Macau. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC 12 TCK IndonesianLijadi, A. A. (2016). Taruna Budaya Ketiga. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 12. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2016/06/kc12-tck-indonesian2.pdf

Rather than arranging for translation of all concepts into one language at a time, given the diversity of authors, it seems most appropriate to let each author translate their own work into their own languages. Several scholars who were not part of this original group have already written to ask permission to translate concepts, which will expand the number of translations for each concept. This may come across as a little disorganized, especially at the start when only a few translations appear. However, for ideological reasons, it seems the best choice. And it certainly has been a popular decision: I have never received so many offers to do so much work so quickly in response to a request!

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because several dozen are currently in process. And, as always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. As of this writing, 78 have been published in English, but words from Chinese, Portuguese, Japanese, Spanish, Belarusian, German and Arabic have also been introduced (with the discussion provided in English). As of this writing, I have received offers to translate one or more concepts into Arabic, Belarusian, Chinese, Finnish, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Kapampangan, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish and Tagalog (in alphabetical order). There is even a possibility of videos presenting American Sign Language versions. So if anyone else wants to join in the fun, just let me know.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Anastasia Aldelina Lijadi Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesAnastasia Aldelina Lijadi joined the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in September 2017 as Research Scholar with the World Population (POP) Program. She is part of the team working under a 2017 ERC grant to make unconventional cross-disciplinary contributions in developing new human well-being indicators.

Anastasia Lijadi

Anastasia completed her PhD in Psychology at the University of Macau in 2015. Her PhD dissertation won the 2015 Atlas TI Award for the best dissertation using qualitative methods at PhD level from the International Institute of Qualitative Methodology, University of Alberta.  She received her master degree in Counseling and Psychotheraphy from the University of Saint Joseph, Macau, in 2010.

Her recent publications include:

Lijadi, A. A. (2019). Third Culture Kids. In P. Moy (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Communication. New York: Oxford University Press.

Lijadi, A. A. (2018). “I am not weird, I am Third Culture Kids”: Identifying enabling modalities for place identity construction among high mobility populations. Journal of Migration and Identity Studies, 12 (2), 2-24.

Lijadi, A. A., & Van Schalkwyk, G. J. (2017). Place identity construction of Third Culture Kids: Eliciting voices of children with high mobility lifestyle. Geoforum, 81, 120-128. doi: 10.1016/j.geoforum.2017.02.015.

Lijadi, A. A. & Van Schalwyk, G. J. (2017). Homesickness and perceived university support of first year undergraduate students: The Macau experience. College Student Journal, 51(3).

Lijadi, A. A. & Van Schalkwyk, G. J. (2016). “The international schools are not so international after all”: Online focus group study on educational platform for Third Culture Kids. International Journal of School and Education Psychology, 6(1). http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21683603.2016.1261056.

Lijadi, A. A., & Van Schalkwyk, G. J. (2014). Narratives of Third Culture Kids: Commitment and reticence. The Qualitative Report, 19, Article 49, pp. 1-18.

Lijadi, A. A. (2014). Ethnic estrangement and social mobility in Macao: Perspective of youth on intergenerational transfer of ritual and tradition. International Proceeding of Economic Development and Research, 71, 74-78. DOI: 10.7763/IPEDR. 2014. V71. 14.

Key Concepts #12: Third Culture Kids

Key Concepts in ICDThe next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. Lists organized  chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

kc12-sm

Lijadi, A. A. (2014). Third culture kids. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 12. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2014/04/key-concept-third-culture-kids.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.