When Culture and Visible Identity Clash

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What does Irishness look like? (2018). Directed by Ola Majekodunmi.

What is “Irishness”? And what do you think it looks like? Many have a stereotypical view of this when it comes to mind. However, there is no one way to look Irish.

A raw short video-documentary based on personal stories from 15 different people who are Irish but are often questioned about their identity. It challenges people’s prejudice and opens a discussion on how we think about identity.

 

For a related series of videos, see Yes, I’m Irish, from The Journal of Ireland.

See also Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, #22: Cultural Identity.

ETHMIGSURVEYDATA Network Training School (Spain but Online)

EventsInternational Ethnic and Immigrant Minorities’ Survey Data Network Training School, December 17-18, 2020, UAM / Casa de Velázquez, Madrid, Spain (but online). Deadline: October 23, 2020.

Organizers invite applications for participation in the 4th ETHMIGSURVEYDATA network Training School. As part of the COST Action CA16111 “International Ethnic and Immigrant Minorities’ Survey Data Network” (ETHMIGSURVEYDATA), the 4th Training School seeks to train a new generation of researchers interested in Ethnic and Migrant Minorities’ (EMM) integration with survey data by offering them the tools to design and analyze survey datasets on ethnic minorities or migrant minorities. The sessions will focus on methodological, conceptual, and ethical issues in designing and analyzing datasets on cross cultural / cross national research. Trainees will be offered guidelines regarding new and innovative ways of post-harmonizing datasets on EMM groups. The Training School will be delivered fully online, given the current public health situation.

CFP Diversity, Intersectionality, Transnationality & Pedagogy

“PublicationCall for Papers: Diversity, Intersectionality, Transnationality, and Pedagogy, Communication Education Forum, to be edited by Ahmet Atay (College of Wooster). Deadline: November 15, 2020.

The discourse of cultural diversity has emerged as a vital component of communication pedagogy. However, the current political events and social contexts that surround us—such as the Black Lives Matter movement, ongoing negative immigration discourse, changing visa policies to limit the experiences of immigrants and international students, as well as homophobia and transphobia within and outside of higher education—invite us, as communication education scholars, to respond to these exigencies and be more self-reflexive of our pedagogies. Perhaps more than ever before, the notion of cultural diversity is an instrumental part of communication pedagogy and of what we do in the classroom.

To understand the current political moment and the cultural dynamics that are shaping our interactions and pedagogies within and outside of the classroom, there is a need for a dynamic intersectional approach to our scholarship. Our classrooms are political because as faculty and students, we bring our culturally and politically marked bodies into the classroom. Hence, how we teach and learn, as well as what we do with the information we share, is always political, ideological, contextual, and influenced by history. Furthermore, our identities are fluid, ever-changing, and intersectional. The pedagogies that we employ must recognize this complex positionality and intersectionality.

Building on the discourse of critical communication pedagogy and critical intercultural communication pedagogy, this forum aims to provide a scholarly space to engage with critical approaches and intersectionality in the context of communication pedagogy. This forum invites scholars to engage with current political and cultural dynamics and how they are embodied in the classroom. Authors should address the following two questions in their essays:

    1. How can intersectionality help us to make sense of the current political moment and cultural dynamics in the classroom?
    2. In what ways can critical frameworks (e.g., transnational, postcolonial, decolonizing, feminist, and queer approaches) individually or intersectionally help communication teachers to engage with diversity?

The forum will consist of four essays. Essays should not exceed 1,000 words, including references. Please direct forum questions to Ahmet Atay. Please email a blinded copy of your essay by November 15, 2020, to Melissa Broeckelman-Post, Consulting Editor for Forums.

KC89 Xenophobia Translated into Spanish

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#89: Xenophobia which Anastasia Karakitsou wrote for publication in English in 2017, and which Daniel Mateo Ordóñez has now translated into Spanish.

KC89 Xenophobia_Spanish

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

Karakitsou, A. (2020). Xenofobia (Trans. D. M. Ordóñez). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 89. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2020/10/kc89-xenophobia_spanish.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Europa-Universität Flensburg Postdoc (Germany)

PostdocsResearch Associate (PostDoc), Europa-Universität Flensburg, Flensburg, Germany. Deadline: 30 November 2020.

As this job announcement is open to candidates from all disciplines, the position’s institutional affiliation within EUF is currently undefined. The employment start date of 1 March 2021 may be modified if the selected candidate is contractually bound to a specific position.

Within the scope of the advertised position, the selected candidate should develop and submit to the German Research Foundation (DFG, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft), for example within the funding lines of the DFG’s Individual Research Grants program, Emmy Noether Program, a funding application for her/his own position and hence for the continuation of her/his research at Europa-Universität Flensburg. Through this start-up funding, EUF aims to promote and support early-stage researchers by giving them access to special qualification and employment opportunities.

This year’s call for proposals targets early-stage scholars with experience in a discipline represented by Europa-Universität Flensburg. The planned research project can be based outside of the university’s existing research centers, or can be connected to these. It is expected to be an innovative project that ties in with the academic profile of the corresponding discipline.

U Portland: Prof for Development of Ethnic Studies (USA)

“JobAssociate Professor/Professor for Development of Ethnic Studies (Tenure-Track), College of Arts & Sciences, University of Portland, Portland, OR. Deadline: November 15, 2020.

The College of Arts & Sciences (CAS) at University of Portland invites applications for a full-time, tenure-track associate or professor rank faculty position in ethnic studies, beginning in fall 2021 (pending final budget approval). The successful candidate will lead the college’s formation and establishment of a new ethnic studies undergraduate major and minor that work across disciplines. The ethnic studies program will support the university’s mission of embedding diverse perspectives, especially of underrepresented populations, in the curriculum. Candidates should have experience in interdisciplinary and intersectional methods as they relate to ethnic studies. Expertise in an area(s) such as African American, Asian American, Latinx, Native American, Pacific Islander American Studies is especially welcome. The successful candidate should have higher-education experience commensurate with the rank of at least associate professor and also organizational or administrative experience that gives them the necessary expertise to initiate and oversee the new program.

Virtual Marathon for Dialogue

Resources in ICD“ width=Virtual Marathon for Dialogue, Anna Lindh Foundation, Alexandria, Egypt (online resource).

The Anna Lindh Foundation Virtual Marathon for Dialogue consists in a series of cultural activities, weekly webinars on main issues for the promotion of EuroMed cultural cooperation, virtual trainings, seminars, exhibitions, debates led by the ALF Networks and partners, and building on all the work the ALF had done in preparation of MedForum 2020.

The main components include:

  • A regional launch event on 30 September 2020, in partnership with IEMED as the Head of the Anna Lindh Foundation Spanish National Network
  • The organization of a series of activities planned within the different programmes of the Foundation between September and December 2020 that will be the occasion to initiate the debate on the state and the future of EuroMed cooperation
  • The presentation of the ALF civil society contribution during the UFM regional Forum between 25 and 27 November in close coordination with the Secretariat of the Union for the Mediterranean
  • The launch of a social media campaign running through 2021 to broadly spread the messaging of the initiative and engaging a large audience and social media influences with a specific focus on youth
  • A traditional media campaign and coverage of the Virtual Marathon for Dialogue activities at the EuroMed level
  • A programme of virtual activities as mentioned earlier including regional conferences, workshops, exhibitions, trainings and debates in the first semester of 2021 to be organised in coordination with the ALF Heads of Network and network members as well as some of the ALF partners
  • And final regional outcomes activity in Croatia in 2021 where they had planned to implement MEDForum 2020

Inclusive Teaching Practices Toolkit

Intercultural PedagogyInclusive Teaching Practices Toolkit, Association of College and University Educators.

The Association of College and University Educators (ACUE) has just produced an “Inclusive Teaching Practices Toolkit” intended to help faculty copy with diverse classrooms. The guidelines are valuable in face-to-face courses, but are specifically intended for today, when so many faculty are suddenly required to teach online, without adequate guidelines. The toolkit is available free of charge on their website (follow the link above).

By implementing inclusive teaching practices, faculty create learning environments where all students feel they belong and have the opportunity to achieve at high levels.

The 10 practices included are:

  • Ensure your course reflects a diverse society and world.
  • Ensure course media are accessible.
  • Ensure your syllabus sets the tone for diversity and inclusion.\
  • Use inclusive language.
  • Share your gender pronouns.
  • Learn and use students’ preferred names.
  • Engage students in a small-group introductions activity.
  • Use an interest survey to connect with students.
  • Offer inclusive office hours.
  • Set expectations for valuing diverse viewpoints.

The Inclusive Teaching Practices Toolkit was developed by ACUE in collaboration with Dr. Marlo Goldstein Hode, Senior Manager, Strategic Diversity Initiatives, Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, University of Missouri-St. Louis.

Research Center for Japanese Studies: Visiting Researchers

Fellowships
Visiting Research Scholars, International Research Center for Japanese Studies, Kyoto, Japan, for 2022-23. Deadline: October 31, 2020.

The International Research Center for Japanese Studies seeks to promote comprehensive, international, and interdisciplinary research on Japanese culture, and to foster cooperation among researchers in Japanese studies worldwide. In order to broaden and deepen research on Japanese culture and bring together researchers in a variety of specialized fields, the Center regularly appoints a number of scholars from around the world as Visiting Research Scholars. The Center invites applications from scholars who wish to conduct research while in residence. Visiting Research Scholars are expected to engage in collaborative activity with the Center’s permanent faculty by, for example, participating in at least one of the team research projects.

CFP Are We Making a Difference? Peacebuilding Effectiveness

“PublicationCall for Chapters: Are We Making a Difference? Global and Local Efforts to Assess Peacebuilding Effectiveness, to be edited by Stacey L. Connaughton (Purdue) and Jasmine R. Linabary (Emporia State). Deadline for abstract only: November 1, 2020.

Assessing Peace CFP

Chapter abstracts invited for a forthcoming edited book project on assessment and peacebuilding. The book is entitled “Are we making a difference?: Global and local efforts to assess peacebuilding effectiveness” and will be published by Rowman & Littlefield. Peacebuilding practitioners at local, national, and international levels and educators are the primary audiences for the book.

This edited volume seeks to highlight data-driven/evidence-based efforts to assess the effectiveness of peacebuilding efforts worldwide and to be inclusive of voices worldwide and of diverse methods for assessing effectiveness (e.g., qualitative, quantitative, participatory). The book will also serve as a platform to share case studies of, critical reflections on, and practical tools for assessment. We encourage chapters written by peacebuilding practitioners and/or academics from a variety of fields. We are particularly interested in chapters written by or co-authored with local peacebuilders.