CID Poster #3: Intercultural Dialogue

CID PostersThis is the third of the posters designed by Linda J. de Wit, in her role as CID intern. The quote by Peter Praxmarer does not come from a publication, but from a Skype conversation we had on April 25, 2017. I was struck by what he said, and how nicely it summed up the concept of intercultural dialogue, and requested permission to turn the definition into a poster, and he graciously agreed. In terms of visual design, Linda indicated “art” by the picture frame, and “science” by the design in the background. Hopefully this definition will find a wide audience, because I think it does a better and more concise job of explaining intercultural dialogue than other definitions I’ve seen.

Intercultural Dialogue definition

Just in case anyone wants to cite this poster, the following would be the recommended format:

Center for Intercultural Dialogue. (2017). Intercultural Dialogue. CID Posters, 3. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/07/art-and-science.png

As with other series, if you wish to contribute an original contribution, please send an email before starting any work to receive approval, to minimize inadvertent duplication, and to learn about technical requirements. As is the case with other CID Publications, posters should be created initially in English. Given that translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue have received so many views, anyone who wishes to translate their own poster into another language (or two) is invited to provide that as well. If you want to volunteer to translate someone else’s poster into a language in which you are fluent, send in a note before starting, to receive approval and to confirm no one else is working on the same one.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

U New South Wales PHD Scholarships (Australia)

FellowshipsPhD Scholarship – Media and Social Justice. Up to 2 PhD Scholarships on the theme of Media and Social Justice may be awarded in the UNSW Scientia Scholarship scheme at the University of New South Wales (in Sydney, Australia). Expressions of Interest are due before 21 July, 2017. Prospective applicants should contact A/Prof Tanja Dreher for further details as soon as possible.

Research theme: 21st Century Media for Social Justice

Digital media have opened up unprecedented possibilities for marginalised communities to find a voice, speak up, and share stories. Indigenous and community media are developing rapidly, while digital media are being mobilised for advocacy with refugees and asylum seekers, and used by geographically dispersed communities to maintain long distance relationships. This project investigates the opportunities and challenges for marginalized voices to be heard in the age of digital media. Key questions include: 1. What are the impacts of Indigenous, refugee and community media, online and off? In particular, how do policymakers and mainstream media professionals ‘listen’ in response to Indigenous, community and refugee media? 2. How do new technologies enable the development of transnational cyberpublics, maintaining affective relations over distance and difference? 3. What are the opportunities and challenges for minority media producers in the age of digital disruption? 4. How does the changing media environment impact on mediated identities?

The Scientia Scholarship Scheme:

The UNSW Scientia PhD Scholarship Scheme aims to harnessing cutting-edge research to solve complex problems and improve the lives of people in local and global communities. Scientia scholars will have a strong commitment to making a difference in the world with demonstrated potential for contributing to the social engagement and/or global impact pillars of the UNSW 2025 Strategy.  The Scientia Scheme is targeted in that applicants will apply to a specific research area with an identified supervisory team and application is by nomination. The scheme is highly competitive across all disciplines at UNSW.

 

CFP ICA Africa Regional Training Workshop (Uganda)

International Communication Association (ICA) Africa Regional Training Workshop
1st ICAfrica Research and Publication Training Workshop
Growing Communication Research and Scholarship in Africa through Training and Mentorship
October, 2017

ICAfrica and the Local Organizing Committee (LOC) hereby invite Extended Abstracts/Research Proposals for the first ICAfrica Regional Academic Training Workshop to be hosted by the Uganda Martyrs University. The academic training workshop will focus on the theme of Growing Communication Research and Scholarship in Africa through Training and Mentorship.

Please ensure your abstract meets the requirements.

Those who wish to participate should submit a Research Abstract.  The abstract should be 1,500-2,000 words and should represent work-in-progress. The work does not have to be in a perfect state, as the intention is to build from this abstract to a full manuscript with assistance from the training workshop.

U London PHD Studentships: Impact of Religion & Belief in Britain

FellowshipsPhD Studentships: Impact of Religion And Belief In Modern British LifeGoldsmiths, University of London, Deadline: July 14, 2017

The Faiths and Civil Society Unit at Goldsmiths, University of London and William Temple Foundation are pleased to announce the creation of five full-time and fully funded Ph.D studentships to explore the role and impact of religion and belief in modern British life. William Temple was Archbishop of Canterbury in the early 1940s whose theological and political thought and national leadership were instrumental in the creation the post-war universal and comprehensive welfare state. Indeed the ‘welfare state’ was a phrase he coined.

Successful applicants will co-design and curate one public impact event each year (at Goldsmiths, University of London or elsewhere – as appropriate) highlighting their research methodologies and or findings, as well as contributing regular blogs and social media feeds for both FCSU and WT Foundation platforms.

Applications are invited from potential researchers in the following areas:

  • Faith-based social enterprise and its contribution to current debates and practices about the efficacy of the social enterprise model for economic and community/relational regeneration.
  • Non-religious forms of belonging and belief as generators of social capital and community resilience.
  • Progressive localism: Comparative partnerships between local authorities and faith sector and implications for both renewed democracy, inclusion and a performative apologetics.
  • Christian/faith based environmental movements in the UK and emerging critical theologies of the environment.
  • Women-curated spaces of Christian/Muslim dialogue and their impacts on both internal (religious) and external (social/civic/political) structures as well as methodologies of dialogue and cohesion.

Each PhD scholarship is for a total of £25,170 over three years to cover fees (£4,195 per annum) and maintenance (£4,195 per annum). This opportunity is open to home/EU applicants.

Akari Takenishi Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesAkari Takenishi has recently completed a Master’s degree in International and Intercultural Communication at Royal Roads University in Canada. She earned her Bachelor’s degree in Geography, focusing on the cultural and social aspects of Geography at the University of Victoria. She is interested in studying multiculturalism in Canada. Examining her personal experiences as an international student from Japan, she wrote about the influences of multiculturalism on self-representation of identity in society. While completing her Master’s, she also served as research assistant for a study examining the impacts of social media on higher education.

Akari Takanishi photoAkari has served as an interpreter and translator, believing that the power of knowledge is limitless and translation is one of the most influential ways to make knowledge reach a greater audience. She has translated several TED talks into Japanese, including:

  • “You don’t need an app for that” By Toby Shapshak
  • “Don’t insist on English” By Patricia Ryan
  • “How to air-condition outdoor spaces” By Wolfgang Kessling
  • “Learning from Sherman the shark” by Jim Toomey
  • “The economic injustice of plastic” by Van Jones

Having grown up in a small village in Japan, she appreciates nature and enjoys growing plants. She became involved in her family tea farm as a distributor dealing with a local tea shop in Canada. Her life has brought her unexpected opportunities and excitement and she feels fortunate to be surrounded by friends, family and mentors who support her personal life as well as academic pursuits. Her academic interests include:

  • Designing a platform where small farmers around the world can share their knowledge and experience with sustainable farming methods, resource management, and reliable market building.
  • Investigating the role of eco-politics in international relations and how it challenges international relations theory in global environmental conflicts.
  • Investigating the academic language proficiency of international graduate students studying in North America and the accuracy of scores of English proficiency tests in portraying academic language skills.

Akari is currently increasing her translation skills, focusing on articles and journals related to intercultural communication and competence. She would like to connect with any individuals or groups who share similar academic interests to discuss future projects and opportunities. As a recent graduate, she is excited to share her knowledge and skills, and learn more from others, hoping that she can be a part of a positive change for a socially and environmentally sustainable future.

Key Concept #28: Postcolonialism Translated into Dutch

Key Concepts in ICDToday I am posting KC#28: Postcolonialism, originally prepared by Raka Shome for publication in English in 2014, and which Linda J. de Wit has now translated into Dutch. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC28 Postcolonialism_DutchShome, R. (2017). Postkolonialisme. (L. J. de Wit, Trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 28. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/07/kc28-postcolonialism_dutch.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

U Jyväskylä Job Ad: Intercultural & Digital Communication (Finland)

Associate Professor, Intercultural and Digital Communication, University of Jyväskylä

The University of Jyväskylä is a nationally and internationally significant research university and an expert on education that focuses on human and natural sciences. The University is Finland’s leading expert in teacher education and adult education, as well as the major exporter of education. The Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences is the only one in the country. The University of Jyväskylä is known for its dynamic operating culture and strong commitment to social responsibility.

Department of Language and Communication Studies is currently seeking to recruit an Associate Professor (tenure track), Intercultural and Digital Communication, starting January 1st 2018 for a fixed-term period of five years. The Associate Professor’s position is allocated to Department of Language and Communication Studies in the discipline of Intercultural communication. The position supports the profiling of the department at the two core fields of the University strategy (Languages, Culture and Communities in Global Change Processes, and Information Technology and the Human in the Knowledge Society) and the profiling measure Language in Changing Society.

The duties of the associate professor include active international research and publication activity, initiating and leading research projects, acquiring external research funding, active participation in national and international networks, teaching and supervision in undergraduate and postgraduate training, and leading the international master’s programme. The duty of the associate professor is in particular to develop future oriented research and teaching in the field of intercultural and digital communication.

The successful applicant needs to have strong evidence of research and teaching in intercultural communication. Research in the areas of digital communication and communication technologies is considered an asset. Success in acquiring external funding, supervision of theses, and administrative experience are also considered an asset. The emphasis in the evaluation is based on strong international research profile and on experience in teaching and supervision. In addition, the successful applicant is expected to have broad theoretical and methodological expertise.

Please submit your application at the latest on Monday, August 14th 2017 using the online application form.

U Melbourne Job Ad: ESL (Australia)

Job adsLecturer in ESL, University of Melbourne – School of Languages and Linguistics (Australia)

The School of Languages and Linguistics teaches a broad suite of undergraduate and graduate courses, maintains a vigorous research higher degree culture, and has an internationally-recognised research profile.  The School now seeks to appoint a Lecturer (Level B) continuing, to consolidate and further develop the School’s teaching and research programs.

The position is located in Linguistics & Applied Linguistics, which offers an undergraduate major and minor in Linguistics & Applied Linguistics, as well as a graduate Master of Applied Linguistics, in addition to an Honours program and a large PhD program. The School also offer an ESL program which includes a suite of credit-bearing subjects at undergraduate and graduate level.  The Lecturer will contribute to research in teaching in ESL as well as Applied Linguistics. A specialization in an area such as intercultural communication, second language writing, English language research and global Englishes will be preferred.

The Lecturer will contribute to teaching excellence in the ESL program and Applied Linguistics including the coordination of subjects, preparation and conduct of lectures and tutorials and related assessment, and consultations with students.

Employment Type: Full-time continuing position available from 1 January 2018           

Close date: 16 July 2017

CID Poster #2: Key Concepts as the World

CID PostersThis is the second of the posters designed by Linda J. de Wit, in her role as CID intern. This poster names all of the 81 Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue already published to the site, bringing them together into a representation of the world.

Key Concepts poster

Just in case anyone wants to cite this poster, the following would be the recommended format:

Center for Intercultural Dialogue. (2017). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue. CID Posters, 2. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.org/2017/07/07/cid-poster-2-key…pts-as-the-world/

As with other series, if you wish to contribute an original contribution, please send an email before starting any work to receive approval, to minimize inadvertent duplication, and to learn about technical requirements. As is the case with other CID Publications, posters should be created initially in English. Given that translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue have received so many views, anyone who wishes to translate their own poster into another language (or two) is invited to provide that as well. If you want to volunteer to translate someone else’s poster into a language in which you are fluent, send in a note before starting, to receive approval and to confirm no one else is working on the same one.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Key Concept #10: Cross-Cultural Dialogue Translated into Simplified Chinese

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#10: Cross-Cultural Dialogue, which I first published in English in 2014, and which Yan Qiu has now translated into Simplified Chinese. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC10 Cross-Cultural Dialogue_Chinese-simLeeds-Hurwitz, W. (2017). Cross-cultural dialogue [Simplified Chinese]. (Y. Qiu, Trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 10. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2014/04/key-concept-cross-cultural-dialogue.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Save