Loughborough U Residential Fellowships (UK)

Fellowships

Residential Fellowships, Institute for Advanced Studies Loughborough University, Leicestershire, England, UK. Deadline: 15 May 2020.

Loughborough University’s Institute of Advanced Studies has announced a major new initiative, the IAS Residential Fellowship programme, which will begin from September 2020. The Residential Fellowship programme adds significantly to the current portfolio of opportunities offered by the Institute to bring leading international scholars to the University as IAS Fellows.

IAS Residential Fellowships are open to outstanding international researchers from across all disciplines and career stages who wish to pursue a month-long research residency within the scholarly community of Loughborough University and its Institute of Advanced Studies.

CFP Contemporary Media Culture & Society (Argentina)

ConferencesCall for papers: Contemporary Developments on Media, Culture and Society: Argentina and Latin America, The Center for the Study of Media and Society in Argentina (MESO), Universidad de San Andrés, Buenos Aires, Argentina, August 27-28, 2020. Deadline: April 30, 2020.

Submissions should contribute to ongoing conversations about media, culture, and society in empirical, theoretical or methodological ways. They might also broaden our knowledge about the relationship between media, culture, and society at the national and regional level. Articles may refer to different aspects of communication, media, and cultural goods and services in the areas of journalism, entertainment, cinema, theater, television, music, etc. – advertising and marketing, public relations, social media, and video games, among others. This sixth annual conference is sponsored by the Center for Global Culture and Communication at Northwestern University.

CID Video Competition FAQ 2020

Job adsIn past CID Video Competitions, a number of questions have been asked. In hopes this will help others, they are posted here, along with answers. As new questions are asked, they will be added and answered. 

Please read the basic information for the CID Video Competition in 2020, including especially the entry rules, carefully! If submissions do not meet the requirements, they cannot be considered for a prize until and unless they are revised. When ready, submit your video. [Link for uploading to be added May 1]

But…coronavirus!
At this point the competition is still on, despite the pandemic. Some instructors have suggested this can be a particularly useful assignment for courses suddenly moved online. If there is a change, it will be clearly posted, but it is most likely to be an extended deadline rather than a cancellation. So go ahead and make your videos!

This year’s topic is listening. What does that entail?
Listening means paying attention to someone else rather than focusing on your own words and ideas. This is easiest with someone you know well, and hardest with a stranger, especially if that person shares few characteristics with you. But listening is the start of intercultural dialogue, so it’s important. For more details, see this list of additional Resources.

What exactly is intercultural dialogue, anyway?
The short answer: Intercultural dialogue requires at least two people from different cultural groups (so, it can be international, interracial, interethnic, or interfaith). It is active (people actually communicating in some way, having dialogue) rather than passive (knowledge in people’s heads). Here’s a longer answer: Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 1: Intercultural Dialogue. For more details, see this list of additional Resources.

What about intergenerational dialogue, is that intercultural as well?
NO, intergenerational dialogue within a single culture is not usually considered a form of intercultural dialogue. An argument could presumably be made, but that may be difficult given the short time limit for the video.

Can a group of students submit a video instead of one person?
Yes, absolutely. In fact, that is encouraged, as the perfect way to demonstrate listening to different points of view.

How many people maximum in a group are allowed?
Whatever works best for the students – and the instructor in a particular course if the competition is being used as a class assignment – will be fine. We’ve never set a limit.

Can faculty members participate?
NO, this is a competition for students only. Faculty members can serve as informal advisers or critics, and are certainly asked to encourage participation, or even require participation as part of a course if that suits their needs. But faculty members should NOT be part of the group that actually works on the video, and should NOT be the one submitting a video.

Can audiotapes be submitted in lieu of videotapes?
NO, sorry, audiotapes are NOT videotapes.

Where should videos be uploaded?
The link will be added by May 1. You will have to create an account when you get to the site, with your email, name, and a password. Videos should NOT be uploaded directly to YouTube or any other server, please!

Help, I don’t understand the directions when I get to the upload site!
You are asked to “Login or create an account.” The first time there, you need to choose “Create an account,” which requires providing your email address, first name, last name, and making up a password which you provide twice to confirm. Then click on “Register.” At that point you need to answer the questions on the application. If you don’t finish the first time, when you go back to the site, choose “Login” and then finish. Your email is your “Login ID” and the password is the same one you provided when you created the account.

My students are having difficulty submitting their videos. Can a faculty member help with this step?
YES, absolutely. The goal is to have student-created videos. There’s no problem with a faculty member helping to get those videos uploaded so they can be entered in the competition. However, please do NOT do it for them – the account should not be in the faculty member’s name. Let the student create an account, and then help as needed with any technical or translations issues.

My students created videos for this competition as a course assignment, so there are several different videos to be uploaded. Does each video need to be submitted separately?
YES, absolutely. Each video, whether created by one student or by a group of students, should be uploaded separately so it can be evaluated by the judges.

Four of us worked on a video together. Do we submit it once or 4 times?
ONLY ONCE! A group video should be submitted once, with all students who worked on the video being listed as creators. Choose a student who checks their email fairly often as the one to upload the video, so if there are any questions, they will see the email and be able to respond.

Can 30-minute videos be considered?
What part of “no less than 30 seconds, no more than 2 minutes” is unclear?

Is there a language requirement for the videos?
YES, the videos either must be in English or subtitled in English. Permitting other languages would imply having judges who know all the several dozen languages currently represented on the site, which would be impossible. However, choosing to have most of the video silent, with few words, or using another language with English subtitles, are appropriate ways to finesse the language requirement for those who are not native speakers.

Do the videos have to be live action?
NO, animation has been successfully incorporated into several submissions in the past. However, a PowerPoint slideshow is unlikely to result in an award, as that doesn’t make a very successful video.

I want to use video I made of a group singing a song in live performance. I have their permission, but not that of the copyright holder for that song. Is that fair use?

Unfortunately, the short answer is no, you would need permission of the copyright holder of the song. The long answer is that for all fair use questions, see the Documentary Filmmakers Statement of Best Practices in Fair Use and the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Online Video; these and other such best-practices codes are available from the Center for Media and Social Impact.

UCL: Language Learning and Intercultural Communication (UK)

“Job

Professor of Language Learning and Intercultural Communication, Institute of Education, University College London (UCL), London, UK. Deadline: 9 April 2020.

The postholder will provide strategic leadership in the development of research and teaching in the areas of intercultural communication and modern language education, at the IOE and across UCL. The Professor will work with a team of academics whose expertise spans a range of areas in diverse education contexts.

You will develop and lead a new Master’s programme in Intercultural Communication for Language Teaching and Learning, and to lead on the development of an effective research strategy that enables the team to work towards national and international recognition of their work.

Kent State U: Center for International/Intercultural Education (USA)

“Job

Director, Center for International and Intercultural Education, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, USA. Deadline: May 1, 2020.

Kent State seeks a full-time Director for the Gerald H. Read Center for International and Intercultural Education. The successful applicant will lead the mission and activities of the Center and the College of Education, Health, and Human Services in its international and intercultural programming. The Center serves as a catalyst for the advancement of international and intercultural education at Kent State University and beyond. The Director reports directly to the Dean of the College.

CFP: Immigrant Generations, Media Representations and Audiences

“Publication

Call for Proposals: Immigrant Generations, Media Representations and Audiences, book to be edited by Omotayo Banjo. Deadline for abstracts: April 20, 2020.

According to the Pew Research Center, foreign-born immigrants comprise about fourteen percent of the American population. Second-generation Americans (U.S. born children of immigrants) comprise about 12% of the population and is projected to increase to 18% in the next 30 years. As a result, Schildrkraut (2007) argues that multiculturalism is a competing definition of Americanism as it “endorse[s] this notion that America’s unique identity is grounded in its immigrant legacy and in its ability to convert the challenges immigration brings into thriving strengths, pg. 600.” According to the Institute of immigration research report (2015), foreign-born immigrants comprise up to 11% of the entertainment industry with up to six percent representing producers and directors.

Series like Master of None, Jane the Virgin, and films like My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 and Crazy Rich Asians have emerged telling stories which resonate with the intergenerational and intercultural characteristics of American identity. Recently, the Hollywood Reporter initiated a video series hosted by Charlamagne Tha God titled Emerging Hollywood. This interview-platform show captures some new game players in Hollywood who engage American cultural politics from their ancestral perspective and as such offer a more nuanced view of what it is to be American. Entertainers and producers like Hasan Minhaj (Patriot Act), Yvonne Oriji (Jesus and Jollof), Ali Wong (Fresh off the Boat), and Gina Yashere (Bob Hearts Abisola) unashamedly represent their (or their parents’) ancestral land within their home country and engage this hybridity with ingenuity.

Challenging Hollywood’s beliefs that White dominated narratives are universal, these new players demonstrate the story of immigrants and their children both resonates and presents an evolving definition of American identity.

The aim of this anthology is to make room for scholarship which examines how immigrants and their U.S. born children use media to negotiate their American identity and how audiences engage with mediated narratives about the immigrant experience (i.e., cultural adjustments, language use etc).

Submissions may include textual or audience analysis, survey or experimental methods. Texts of interest include film (mainstream and independent), television, web series, original series, books, online magazines, and music which speak to the first and second-generation experience. If possible, the topics should engage to some extent questions of migration, diaspora and media and acculturation. Although the project is under way, newer submissions are welcome to make the volume stronger. Please contact the editor with any questions.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:

  • Deadline for abstracts (approx. 300- 500-words excluding citations): April 20, 2020.
  • Include a cover page with all of the authors’ contact information, key terms, and an abridged c.v. for each author
  • Submit proposals to Omotayo Banjo with “First Gen Media” in the subject line.
  • Invitations to submit full manuscripts will be sent by May 4, 2020
  • If selected, a draft of your chapter submissions must be original works of at least 3000-6000 (estimate) words, references included. Chapter draft deadline: July 24, 2020.

Uygar Doğan Researcher Profile

Researcher Profiles

Uygar Doğan is an Agile Program Lead with Capital One Tech and a language enthusiast. She holds an MBA degree from State University of New York (SUNY) Albany.

Uygar DoganBorn in Turkey, she immigrated to the USA in 1998. She studied English and German as part of her school curriculum in Turkey, and she enjoys translating between the languages of Turkish, German and English. In her current job, she helps software engineers accomplish their goals via Agile methodologies. She currently lives in New York City and appreciates the immense diversity the city has to offer. Her other interests include traveling the world and discovering good Plant Based food wherever she goes. She is happy to be a part of CID’s research community and hopes that through such exchange, the world will learn to become one and appreciate our differences as well as our similarities.

Merian IAS Africa Fellowships (Ghana)

FellowshipsFellowships, Merian Institute for Advanced Studies in Africa (MIASA), University of Ghana, Ghana. Deadline: 31 March 2020.

MIASA supports different kinds of fellowships:

  • individual fellowships,
  • tandem fellowships with one tandem partner from Germany and the other from West Africa, and
  • Interdisciplinary Fellow Groups.

    From 2021 until 2026, MIASA will grant some 20 fellowships per year in total.

    The Maria Sibylla Merian Institute for Advanced Studies in Africa (MIASA) is dedicated to research in the Humanities and Social Sciences, with ‘Sustainable Governance’ as its central topic. More specific sub-topics under this umbrella prominently include sustainable democracy, sustainable peace and conflict management and environmental transformation as well as migration and displacement, restitution of cultural objects, and human rights research. Overarching aims of MIASA are working towards a reduction of global asymmetries in knowledge production and bridging the cultural divide between anglophone and francophone Africa. MIASA, established in 2018, serves as a hub for exchange, networking and collaboration amongst leading researchers from Germany, Ghana, the African and European continents and beyond. It is located on the beautiful campus of the University of Ghana at Legon (Accra). The Institute offers time and space for supporting innovative academic projects in the Humanities and Social Sciences of top international quality.

Maria Flora Mangano: Space of Relationship as a Space of Distance

Guest PostsSpace of relationship as a space of distance: A new proximity. Guest post by Maria Flora Mangano.

NOTE: Maria Flora Mangano has previously written about dialogue as a space of relationship (2018, 20172014) as long-term followers of this site will remember. She suggested this might be a good time to think about what is now being called “Social distancing” and how it relates to the space of relationship that is required for intercultural dialogue to occur.  

Among the measures for controlling the infection of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is the need to avoid interaction among human beings, and, when that is not possible, to fix a distance of at least one meter, according to the World Health Organisation. In addition to the medical masks, in almost every part of the world, this measure implies a prohibition on shaking hands, or hugging and kissing. The warnings stress the need to interact with others without having any contact, especially of hands and face, the parts of the human body which, more than others, may transmit the infection. These two also are the parts of the body which, more than others, transmit the message, thus play a central role in communication.

During these last few days, the global news media have reported several alternatives to greetings and physical contacts created by many people around the world, involving touching elbows, or feet. Also, people have rediscovered the use of non-touching hand gestures, as with namaste, the Buddhist greeting, where hands are put together, or even blinking, as ways to respect a safe distance, yet still acknowledge another person.

The COVID-19 infection is introducing a new space of relationship among individuals, related to our interpersonal communication. This is affecting everyday life at the moment and will probably have effects in the future on human communication. A “new distance” is arising, which may be added to the original four proposed by the anthropologist Edward Hall in 1966 in The Hidden Dimension. He distinguished four levels of distance in spatial interrelationships among humans, which vary by such factors as culture, education, gender, and status. We might now add what has been popularized as “social distancing”) to the intimate, the personal, the social, and the public spaces proposed by Hall.

Despite Hall’s emphasis on cultural differences, as the new distance is required for global safety reasons, this relationship of distance between individuals is the same all over the world. Therefore, it cannot, and it is not supposed to be, different depending such factors as culture, age, education, gender, or status. What may change is the resilient capacity of human beings to find alternatives, to adapt themselves to (almost) every condition, and to try to find an answer, even when it seems hard, as during this time.

The challenge to us all will be to consider this necessary distance imposed on individuals as an opportunity to rethink the space of relationship as a space of proximity to the Other. Distance, as well as proximity, are terms generally related to a physical space of relationship among humans. What happens when this space is dramatically and unexpectedly avoided or altered, as it imposes another dimension, even a fixed measure of separation among individuals?

The opportunity which this social distancing offers is to consider distance, and consequently proximity, unbound from a physical space of relationship. Distance may become another term for proximity, if we will be able to look at the face of the Other even through a medical mask, and from one meter. We may still be touched by the Other’s call, even without touching her/him with our hands.

If we will be able to overcome a physical space of relationship – in the sense of going beyond it, rather than over it – we might also discover a new sense for proximity. It may sound like a paradox, and probably it is, as the challenges required to the human behaviour which affect our daily life. If we will be able to accept the paradox of distance and proximity as one, we may discover that the safe distance established by social distancing can be overcome, in a way, not because we violate the prohibitions, but as we are able to go beyond ourselves towards the Other.

The Latin term alter literally refers to “the other than two”; social distancing is offering us all the chance to alter our perspective of the Other, every Other than us: close or distant, with a medical mask or without, by touching her/him or without using our hands. This implies the opportunity to modify the distance at which we stand from the Other, in terms of prejudices rather than medical or safety prescriptions. It might be surprising to realise, when the COVID-19 epidemic will eventually end, that we have reduced our mental and heart distance from the Other, in addition to again being able to reduce our physical distance.

In these new and solitary days, in our creative country [Italy], a spontaneous proposal was born. It was soon shared among the people and became viral (in every sense!): find a way to encourage the others, with messages posted on the windows and the balconies. The sentence proposed was: “Andrà tutto bene,” or “Everything is going to be fine.” The idea was to write on white sheets, drawing the rainbow. It was soon made by children and families. I thought to draw it on paper and I posted the design on my window facing the road.

CID VIdeo Competition Resources 2020

Job adsThe following resources discussing listening and intercultural dialogue are intended to help to those preparing entries for the CID Video Competition in 2020.

This year’s competition has the theme “listening is how intercultural dialogue starts.” This means students need to demonstrate their understanding of 2 concepts. The first is Listening. Materials published on the CID site that should be useful include:

Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue
#37: Dialogic listening

Constructing Intercultural Dialogues
#6: The privilege of listening first

As well as several posts related to listening:
LIST(e)N and The Day of Listening
Call for Papers: International Listening Association
Call for Papers: Special issue of International Journal of Listening on Listening in mediated contexts

The second part is Intercultural Dialogue. CID has produced a number of overlapping explanations, including:

Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue
#1:    Intercultural dialogue
#8:   Public dialogue
#10: Cross-cultural dialogue
#14: Dialogue
#81: Dialogue as a space of relationship
#84: Double intercultural dialogue

Constructing Intercultural Dialogues
#9: Intercultural dialogue as an activity of daily living
#11: Creating connection through intercultural dialogue partners

CID Posters
#3: Intercultural dialogue
#6: Dialogue defined
#8: Intercultural competence/intercultural dialogue

If you have further questions, see previously published competition rules, and FAQ. See the reflection by one winning team on creating their video. Or send an email with a question. When you’re ready to submit an entry, click here [URL to be added when the competition opens].