York U: Refugee & Diaspora Studies; Human Rights in Middle East (Canada)

“JobThe Department of Equity Studies, Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies, York University, York, Ontario, Canada, invites applications for two positions. Deadline: November 15, 2019.

  1. Assistant Professor, Interdisciplinary Refugee and Diaspora Studies

Applicants should have a PhD in any area of the social sciences (or have completed their PhD at the time of the appointment) that engages with the political, social, economic, legal, and cultural processes that produce the displacement of individuals and groups, and the effects of these processes on refugees, illegalized and racialized migrants, and diasporic communities. Candidates should demonstrate expertise in different theoretical approaches that engage critically with human rights, transnationalism, racialization, nationalism, colonialism, diasporas, borders, and nation-states. Knowledge of and publications relating to UN refugee laws, the Canadian Immigration and Refugee Act, and the ECHR (European Court of Human Rights) is an asset. Candidates must show excellence or promise of excellence in teaching, scholarly research and publication and service.

2. Assistant/Associate Professor, Human Rights in the Middle East

Candidates must have a PhD in International Relations, Political Science, Sociology, Social Science, or a related disciplinary or interdisciplinary field. The successful candidate will demonstrate expertise with respect to critical human rights and equity in the Middle East, including questions of social displacement, cultural dislocation, re/settlement of populations, social, political and economic disparities, social justice, and the relationship between international law and the laws within different nations of the Middle East. A focus on theory and methods relating to these questions would be an asset. Knowledge of the languages of the region (for example Arabic, Persian or Turkish) would also be an asset, as would knowledge of and publications relating to the UIDHR (Universal Islamic Declaration of Human Rights) and CDHRI (the Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam). Demonstrated pedagogical innovation in high priority areas such as experiential education and technology enhanced learning is preferred. Candidates must demonstrate excellence or promise of excellence in teaching, service and in scholarly research, and to have produced publications appropriate to their stage of career.

CFP Global Studies Conference 2020 (Canada)

ConferencesCall for Papers: 13th Global Studies Conference: Globalization and Social Movements: Familiar Patterns, New Constellations? Concordia University, Montreal, Canada, 4-5 June 2020. Deadline: 4 November 2019.

The last decade saw an intensification of social movement activism across the world. In the Global North, widespread discontent with austerity following the 2008 financial collapse gave rise to the Occupy and Indignados movements. In the Global South, political struggles against neoliberalism have been articulated primarily as protests against its institutional embodiments, especially the World Bank and the IMF and their policies of structural adjustment. Other campaigns mobilized against political oppression (e.g., the Arab Spring), racism (e.g., Black Lives Matter), and sexism (e.g., Me Too). Meanwhile, the Tea Party Movement and now Alt Right have shaped activism on the political right. In some mobilizations, such as Gilets Jaunes in France, left and right-wing influences criss-crossed in often contradictory ways. The fact that all these groups are both manifestations of and responses to various aspects of globalization is nothing new. Earlier mobilizations, such as the global justice movement, epitomized by the Zapatistas in Mexico, also expressed global identities and used the technologies of globalization while challenging the dominant version of the process. As a matter of fact, social movements and international non-governmental organizations worked across borders even in the era when state sovereignty was rarely questioned and politics seemed to make sense almost exclusively in national terms. INGOs, whose number has increased exponentially from a few in the nineteenth century to tens of thousands today, are often viewed as indicators of the state of globalization, expanding rapidly when the global system is on an upward trajectory and declining in significance when globalization is on the defensive. This conference aims to explore those and other manifold and often contradictory relationships between social movements and global processes.

U British Columbia: Assistant Profs in Health/Gender/Migration

“JobTwo Assistant Professor positions (health and illness, gender/feminist sociology, and migration), Department of Sociology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Deadline: September 15, 2019.

The Department of Sociology in the Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver) invites applications for two tenure-stream faculty positions at the rank of Assistant Professor beginning July 1, 2020. The substantive area of specialization for these two positions is OPEN although the department has identified preferential areas including sociology of health and illness, gender/feminist sociology, and migration.

The ideal candidates will have a demonstrated record of excellence in research and teaching and will help to strengthen our global reputation. The Department expects applicants to have a Ph.D. in sociology at the time of appointment but applicants who have progressed to the point where completion of the Ph.D. is imminent and who demonstrate clear and superior promise of excellent research and teaching will also be considered. The Department is especially interested in attracting candidates with diverse backgrounds and interests who will be capable of successfully working with a multicultural and multiethnic student population.

Communication Styles (by Country)

Resources in ICD“ width=The Centre for Intercultural Learning has created a set of explanations of communication styles and other cultural information published on the Global Affairs Canada website.

These descriptions cover not only Canada, intended to be helpful to those traveling to that country, but dozens of other countries, presumably mostly for Canadians traveling abroad. Topics range from what is typically addressed in a first conversation with someone (for Canada, “what do you do?” meaning in terms of work or occupation) to relationship-building (“meals are good spaces for building rapport”).

The Centre for Intercultural Learning is part of the Canadian Foreign Service Institute of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada.

CBC Radio on Indigenous Identity (Canada)

Resources in ICD“ width=Unreserved is the radio space for Indigenous community, culture, and conversation on CBC Radio (Canada). Host Rosanna Deerchild takes you straight into Indigenous Canada, from Halifax to Haida Gwaii, from Shamattawa to Ottawa, introducing listeners to the storytellers, culture makers and community shakers from across the country.

Episodes include:

Exploring the Complicated world of Cultural Identity looks at cultural identity and how Indigenous people see themselves in a world that wants to paint them all with one brush. Identity, of course, is a complicated and touchy issue in a lot of communities in Canada, as elsewhere.

A full list of podcasts is here.

It’s not part of Unreserved, but a brief video by CBC Radio is also interesting: What’s in a Name? From “Redskin” to Indigenous takes a look at what Indigenous Peoples have been called and what they call themselves.

 

 

 

Indigenization of Post-Secondary Institutions (Canada)

Intercultural PedagogyWilson, Kory. (2018).Pulling together: A guide for Indigenization of post-secondary institutions. BCcampus’ Indigenization Professional Learning Series.

“The Foundations Guide is part of an open professional learning series developed for staff across post-secondary institutions in British Columbia. Guides in the series include: Foundations;[1] Leaders and Administrators;[2] Curriculum Developers;[3] Teachers and Instructors;[4] Front-line Staff, Student Services, and Advisors;[5] and Researchers.[6]. These guides are the result of the Indigenization Project, a collaboration between BCcampus and the Ministry of Advanced Education, Skills and Training. The project was supported by a steering committee of Indigenous education leaders from BC universities, colleges, and institutes, the First Nations Education Steering Committee, the Indigenous Adult and Higher Learning Association, and Métis Nation BC.

These guides are intended to support the systemic change occurring across post-secondary institutions through Indigenization, decolonization, and reconciliation. A guiding principle from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada process states why this change is happening.

Reconciliation requires constructive action on addressing the ongoing legacies of colonialism that have had destructive impacts on Aboriginal peoples’ education, cultures and languages, health, child welfare, the administration of justice, and economic opportunities and prosperity. (2015, p. 3)

(From the Overview)

This series is one result of the BCcampus’ Indigenization Project.

CFP Media/Communication in South Asia and its Diaspora (Canada)

ConferencesCall for Proposals: Media and Communication in South Asia and Its Diaspora Worldwide, South Asia Communication Association, Toronto, Canada, August 7-10, 2019. Deadline: May 22, 2019.

As part of the 2019 Association for Education in Journalism and Mass communication (AEJMC) conference theme “Investing in Our Futures,” the South Asia Communication Association (SACA) will host an interactive paper session at the convention in Toronto. Present your research on media and communication in South Asia or its diaspora worldwide. A committee of renowned scholars will review submissions. Since SACA is an institutional initiative of AEJMC, this session will be featured in the official program of the AEJMC annual conference.

CFP Local Alignments, Global Upheaval (Canada)

ConferencesCall for proposals: Local Alignments, Global Upheaval: Re-Imagining Peace, Legitimacy, Jurisdiction and Authority, October 4-6, 2019, Canadian Mennonite University, Winnipeg, Canada. Deadline: May 1, 2019.

Annual conference of the Peace and Justice Studies Association (PJSA) & Peace and Conflict Studies – Canadian Association (PACS-Can) invites peace and justice scholars and students, community-based practitioners, experiential educators, musicians, artists, and social movement organizers to join in conversations reimagining peace through local alignments amidst global upheavals. 

Calling upon the depth and breadth of the inter-disciplinary peace scholarship and conflict resolution practices reflected in the PJSA and PACS-Can membership, this conference aims to further dialogue, mobilize strategy, and catalyze new insights and practices that empower global change through interconnected local actions. Participants are encouraged to frame their contributions to the conference in ways that shed light on the dynamics of social upheavals and revolutionary social histories.

Cole Foundation Grants: ICD Through Theatre (Canada)

Intercultural Conversations-Conversations Interculturelles programme, Cole Foundation, Montreal, Canada. Deadline: Sept. 27, 2019.

Now in its 11th year encouraging theatrical dialogue between the various cultures in Montreal. Cole Foundation is pleased to announce the latest grant winners for the Intercultural Conversations-Conversations Interculturelles (IC-CI) programme, initiated to encourage greater understanding of Montreal’s cultural mosaic by having audiences enjoy professional plays that present stories and issues of diversity on stage. For the past ten years the Foundation has focused on intercultural and racialized theatrical conversations for their community initiatives. This has created an award-winning catalogue incorporating themes of inclusion and cultural dialogue. Adding to those, the programme has now expanded to include stories with and about other marginalized communities such as LGBTQ and people with a disability. This year$490,400 was granted, the highest amount of award money since the IC-CI programme’s launch.

Heading into the 11th year of this invaluable program, commissioning grants are more sought after than ever. “We are buoyed with the rising interest of companies creating their own Quebec narrative, one that encompasses our diverse reality,” said Cole. The plays, stronger and stronger from year to year, encompass a widespread range of cultures and the varied communities within them. Works include themes and ideas about questioning one’s community connection without knowing the language or following traditions; reconnecting with lost roots; exploring what it’s like to come from two different cultures and races; falling in love with the ‘enemy’ from another religion; the stigma of disabilities; women suffering the consequences of war; the stress of immigrant children; our accepted history of the settlement and occupation of the Canadian West; shame amongst members of marginalized communities; the current crisis in Venezuela; notions of sovereignty and nationalism; intergenerational impacts of the residential school system; and Muslim women on the path to self-determination. Performance styles include comedy, drama, multimedia, dance, spoken-word, musicals, storytelling, mask work, cabarets, staged readings and using virtual reality devices.

Grants for the next competition relate to shows starting March 1, 2020 and for the 2020-21 and 2021-22 theatre seasons. The deadline for the next competition of the award is Sept. 27, 2019. Theatre companies interested in applying for a grant will be able to download the necessary application forms and information from the Cole Foundation’s web site at: www.colefoundation.ca/community/competition-forms.

Simon Fraser U: Migration & Communication (Canada)

“JobAssistant Professor in Migration & Communication, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada. Deadline: January 10, 2019 or until filled.

The School of Communication at Simon Fraser University invites applications from outstanding candidates for a tenure-track position at the rank of Assistant Professor in the area of Migration in relation to theories and methodologies in the field of communication. Specific areas may include, but are not limited to: Trans- and intranational displacement and migration; diasporic communities; refugees and asylum seekers; colonialism, Indigeneity and resistance; migrant labour and virtual migration; populist anti-immigrant discourses; social movements; surveillance and data; borderlands; ICT4D and mobile technologies; global networks. Approaches welcomed that include but are not limited to intersectional feminist and queer studies, critical race, political economy, cultural and media studies, policy studies, Indigenous studies, and activism. Methods welcomed address these or other issues using qualitative, quantitative, computational, digital methods or a combination of approaches.