UNESCO Youth Eyes on the Silk Roads Photo Contest 2021

Photo ContestYouth Eyes on the Silk Roads Photo Contest, UNESCO, Paris, France. Deadline: 24 August 2020.

The annual Youth Eyes on the Silk Roads International Photo Contest offers an exciting opportunity for young people from all over the world to capture their understanding of the shared heritage of the Silk Roads through the lens of their camera. As the visual arts, and in particular photography, are so often used by today’s youth as a powerful tool for communication and self-expression, images have the potential to play a significant role in raising awareness of the key issues facing our contemporary globalizing world. This year in particular, at a time where many educational and cultural institutions have been temporarily closed, the photo contest provides an opportunity for young people to connect with one another in a digital space and share their creativity and vision for our post-pandemic world. Many hubs of social activity and human interaction, including schools, have been adversely affected by Covid-19, in light of these disruptions UNESCO is endeavouring to support remote learning, educational access, and youth engagement with culture, through its many initiatives.

Organized within the framework of the UNESCO Silk Roads Programme, and in line with the objectives of UNESCO Management of Social Transformations (MOST) Programme, the UNESCO Youth Programme, by UNESCO’s Social and Human Sciences Sector, the 2021 edition of the Youth Eyes on the Silk Roads photo contest is open for entries from 24 May 2021 to 24 August 2021.

The photographs must accurately reflect the theme, “Reveal the Silk Roads”, through representations of Gastronomy and Food ProductionMusic and Dance, and Traditional Sports and Games.

UNESCO: Art-Lab for Human Rights & Dialogue (Online)

“UNESCO”Art-Lab for Human Rights and Dialogue, for World Day for Cultural Diversity for Dialogue and Development, UNESCO and Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (webinar),  22 May 2020.

Five “artivists”, artists/activists, will share with the audience how they adapted, in light of Covid-19, their strategies to reach out to the most vulnerable, who are also, most often, the most invisible. Moreover, they will explain how the pandemic has uncovered human and social realities that we can no longer afford to avoid in the post Covid-19 era.

Art-Lab places human rights and dignity at the centre of sustainable development where cultural diversity and dialogue play a fundamental role. In particular, it strives to mainstream artistic and cultural programmes to reposition the central issue of human rights for policy-actors and to support vulnerable communities in the advancement of their human rights and dignity, by providing them with the necessary resistance resources through the Arts.

The webinar aims to shed light on the important role of art and culture as a tool for Dialogue and Development within a context where economic, social and cultural gaps are growing in parallel with the pandemic – echoing #ArtConnects and #ResiliArt, UNESCO’s recent social media campaign shedding light on the resilience of artists during the pandemic.

Held every year on 21 May, the World Day for Cultural Diversity for Dialogue and Development celebrates not only the richness of the world’s cultures, but also the essential role of intercultural dialogue for achieving peace and sustainable development. The United Nations General Assembly first declared this World Day in 2002, following UNESCO’s adoption of the 2001 Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity, recognizing the need to “enhance the potential of culture as a means of achieving prosperity, sustainable development and global peaceful coexistence.”

UNESCO: Concrete Experiences for Transformational Change

“UNESCO”

Report Addendum: Concrete Experiences for Transformational Change, CID Focus Groups for the UNESCO Futures of Education Initiative, May 2021.

CID Focus Groups report for UNESCOIn January, UNESCO invited the Center for Intercultural Dialogue to participate in the Futures of Education Initiative by holding focus groups on how education needs to evolve today, in order to be more relevant tomorrow. Three sessions were convened, on January 28, 29, and 30, 2021. A report of our conclusions, framed as a response to the UNESCO document, Education in a Post-COVID World: Nine Ideas for Public Action, was submitted in February.

CID Poster 14: 10 IdeasWe proposed a tenth idea, that learning to live together requires intercultural dialogue, which was also published as CID Poster #14.

In April, UNESCO asked the Center to return to the forum group participants, this time requesting “innovative and inspiring concrete experiences to serve as good illustrations of activities and approaches that can contribute to transformational change.” Eight members of the original group were able to submit examples by the tight deadline in early May.  Thanks to the participants who were able to respond so quickly:

  • Evangelos A. Afendras (Greece/Malaysia): Stumbling on adverse realities while building a “Humaniversity” for MDG ideals: Some autoethnographic notes
  • Giovanna Carloni (Italy), Virtual exchange as a transformative process in the Global South
  • Mohammed Guamguami (Morocco): COIL education: Glocal principled innovation
  • Nazan Haydari and Onur Sesigür (Turkey): Gender and sound culture workshop in Turkey 
  • Maria Hussain (UK): Nurturing inclusive intercultural dialogue beyond borders through student-led podcasts: The case of Cultural Insight Wednesdays 
  • Sr. Teresa Joseph (India): Don Bosco: Word in the Ear
  • Maura Di Mauro (Italy): Systemic university change towards internationalisation for academia (SUCTIA) 
  • Yehuda Silverman (Canada/USA): Incorporating diversity into intrapersonal peace and conflict prevention

Constructing ICD 12One of these examples has already been published as Constructing Intercultural Dialogues #12, and several others are in preparation as further publications on this site.

UNESCO: Communications & Outreach Consultant (France)

“JobCommunications and Outreach Consultant, Social and Human Sciences Sector, UNESCO, Paris, France. Deadline: 29 April 2021.

UNESCO, in partnership with the Institute for Economics and Peace, is developing an ambitious initiative to strengthen the evidence base on intercultural dialogue as an instrument for sustainable and inclusive peacebuilding. More specifically, work is being undertaken to develop a novel dataset, measuring the enabling environment and impact of intercultural dialogue. The ultimate desired impact of the initiative is to strengthen the effectiveness of intercultural dialogue as an instrument for peacebuilding, enhancing the political and financial commitments to support it (by demonstrating its effectiveness), and offering practical insights to improve operational interventions to support it.

After ongoing work to collect and analyse the data is completed, several key outputs will be produced to present the findings, including: 1) a global report, exploring key trends and insights from the data, along with complementary analysis and reflection; 2) an online ‘barometer’, presenting the data by country and domain, along with associated analysis and methodological clarifications; 3) pilot policy dialogues to mobilise country-level operational responses in response to the insights provided by the data.

To raise awareness of these outputs, encourage engagement with the insights they provide, and build support for onward actions to mobilise them operationally, a comprehensive communications and outreach effort will be made. The Communications and Outreach Consultant will be responsible for these efforts, under the direct supervision of an Associate Programme Specialist in UNESCO’s Inclusion, Rights and Dialogue Section, and under the overall responsibility of the Chief of the Inclusion, Rights and Dialogue Section. The Consultant will work in close cooperation with the various services responsible for communications within UNESCO (including the Sector’s Executive Office and Communications Officer, and the Department for Public Information). The consultant will also liaise closely with the communications team at the Institute for Economics and Peace.

UNESCO Futures of Education Progress Update

“UNESCO”

Progress Update, UNESCO Futures of Education Initiative, UNESCO, Paris, France. Response deadline: April 30, 2021.

 

This document presents a progress update from the International Commission on the Futures of Education to inform global consultation and public engagement processes taking place in March and April 2021, prior to the final drafting of the Commission’s Report. It begins with background information on the initiative and its ambitions. This includes an introduction to the co‐construction and consultation features of the initiative and brief discussion of how the Commission is framing the report. The second section of the text presents the provisional outline of the report, followed by an explanation of the main points and arguments currently envisioned for each section and sub‐section.

They are requesting comments and suggestions on this document—particularly around (a) the coherence of the arguments presented, (b) what elements need further attention, development or are missing, and (c) what is most novel and promising about the forthcoming Report as currently envisioned. Responses to be received by the end of April 2021 may be submitted online or sent by email.

Read basic information about the Futures of Education Initiative. Or read the CID Report for UNESCO Futures of Education, sharing the results of 3 focus groups we organized at their request.

UNESCO Futures of Education Webinars

“UNESCO”

UNESCO Associated Schools Network Webinars on UNESCO Futures of Education Initiative  (on Zoom), March 26, March 31, or April 1, 2021.

In the last six months, UNESCO’s Associated Schools Network (ASPnet) has mobilized several thousands of teachers, students and their parents from across the globe to engage in joint reflections about education in the future. How can education promote sustainable development (ESD) and global citizenship (GCED), not only today but also tomorrow? How should what, how and where we learn evolve in the future? Learn about the good practices and innovative ideas that came out of these discussions through the Futures of Education x ASPnet Webinar Series.

  • Webinar in French/English: Wednesday, 31 March, 14:00 – 15:30 CET
    • Moderator: Abdelbasset BEN HASSEN, President, Arab Institute for Human Rights
    • Simultaneous interpretation will be available in English and French
    • Please click here to register
  • Webinar in Spanish/English: Thursday, 1 April, 16:00 – 17:30 CET
    • Moderator: Fernando REIMERS, Professor of International Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and Member of the International Commission on the Futures of Education
    • Simultaneous interpretation will be available in English and Spanish
    • Please click here to register

Please note that there will an opportunity during this webinar for the audience to engage with the speakers.

Read basic information about the Futures of Education Initiative. Or read the CID Report for UNESCO Futures of Education, sharing the results of 3 focus groups we organized at their request.

UNESCO Futures of Education Weekly Polls

“UNESCO”Weekly poll, UNESCO Futures of Education Initiative, UNESCO, Paris, France.

UNESCO’s #FuturesOfEducation initiative is exploring how knowledge and learning can shape the future of humanity and the planet. The question they have posed is: What do we want education to look like in 2050? Everyone is invited to participate in their weekly Education 2050 Poll and help design the #FuturesOfEducation. (It is unclear how long they will host these polls.)

Read basic information about the Futures of Education Initiative. Or read the CID Report for UNESCO Futures of Education, sharing the results of 3 focus groups we organized at their request.

CID Poster #14: 10 Ideas

CID Posters

This is a bonus poster, designed by Linda J. de Wit who was the CID intern in 2017, and who has now returned as an occasional graphic design consultant.

This poster illustrates the recommendations of the CID Focus Groups Report for UNESCO’s Futures of Education Initiative to add a 10th idea to their list of 9 ideas, as described in their report, Education in a post-COVID world: Nine ideas for public action.

CID Poster 14: 10 Ideas

In the report, we ask that they consider intercultural dialogue as essential to learning to live together.

Intercultural dialogue permits not merely living together with a wide range of other people but living together with (and despite) our differences, taking empathy, compassion, and respect for all as a given.

Just in case anyone wants to cite this poster, the following would be the recommended format:

Center for Intercultural Dialogue. (2020). Ten ideas. CID Posters, 14. Available from:

As with other series, CID Posters are available for free on the site; just click on the thumbnail to download a printable PDF. This may be downloaded, printed, and shared as is, without changes, without cost, so long as there is acknowledgment of the source.

As with other series, if you wish to contribute an original contribution, please send an email before starting any work to receive approval, to minimize inadvertent duplication, and to learn about technical requirements. As is the case with other CID Publications, posters should be created initially in English. If you want to volunteer to translate a poster into a language in which you are fluent, send in a note before starting, to receive approval.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

CID Report for UNESCO Futures of Education

“UNESCO”UNESCO invited CID to host focus groups as part of the Futures of Education Initiative. Three focus groups held discussions in January. The report has now been completed, and submitted to UNESCO.

We are delighted that UNESCO invited our participation, and hopeful that they will incorporate our recommendations into their final conclusions. A copy of the report may be had by clicking on the image below.

CID Focus Groups report for UNESCO

Thanks to Linda de Wit, former CID intern and skilled graphic designer, for taking on the project of turning the written report into a polished final document. Thanks to Nazan Haydari, Advisory Board member, for moderating one of the focus groups, and managing the technology for all of them. Thanks to all of the participants, who are named in the report, for their ideas, their time, and their energy for this project.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

UNESCO Futures of Education Focus Groups Completed

“UNESCO”

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue held 3 focus groups as part of the UNESCO Futures of Education Initiative, January 28, 29, and 30, 2021.

UNESCO Futures of EducationThanks first to Nazan Haydari, member of the CID Advisory Board, who who served as moderator of one of the groups, and organized the technology through Istanbul Bilgi University.

Thanks next to all of the participants for all of their ideas. They included: Evangelos Afendras (Greece), Chukwuemeka Amajo (Nigeria), Diana Bebenova-Nikolova (Bulgaria), Giovanna Carloni (Italy), Ivett Rita Guntersdorfer (Germany), Mohammed Guamguami (Morocco), Maria Hussain (UK), Teresa Joseph (India), Emilija Jovanovska (USA/Macedonia), Lasana Kazembe (USA), Sergei Kladko (Russia), Maura Di Mauro (Italy), Katrien Mertens (Belgium), Isabel Mohedano Sohm (Spain), M. L. Papusa Molina (Mexico), Maja Nenadovic (Netherlands), Sushil Oswal (USA), Chris Peltier (France), Anne-Nelly Perret-Clermont (Switzerland), Yehuda Silverman (Canada/USA), and Arianna Vettorazzi (Netherlands/Italy).

The report synthesizing our discussions will be completed, submitted to UNESCO, and posted to this site shortly. [update: now posted here]

For everyone else with an interest in the topic but who was unable to respond quickly enough to participate, in addition to the relevant publications posted previously, UNESCO has now offered several additional possibilities:

Passive participation: you may follow the developments on their website, as they post updates.

Active engagement: there are several possibilities:

  • Take the 1-minute survey on the top 3 challenges and purposes of education
  • Write your thoughts on what they see as the one major issue for the futures of education (max 1000 words).
  • Submit an original artwork of what education might look like in 2050.