Georgia Institute of Technology: Asst Prof of Japanese (USA)

“JobAssistant Professor in Japanese, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA. Deadline: 6 March 2019.

The School of Modern Languages at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta invites applications for a tenure-track assistant professor in Japanese. This position is full-time with a 2/2 teaching load, with an anticipated start date of August 1, 2019.

The successful candidate will have (1) a PhD conferred no later than the anticipated appointment start date of August 1, 2019; (2) native or near native fluency in Japanese; (3) an active research and publication agenda; and (4) documented evidence of successful instruction and teaching of Japanese language, culture, and media, particularly at advanced or graduate levels, including applied language and content-based courses.  Preferred areas of expertise include Japanese literature, film studies, media studies, intercultural studies, and science and technology studies. Interest and/or experience in service learning, sustainability, digital humanities, experiential learning, undergraduate and graduate advising, and study abroad is preferred.  Candidates are expected to demonstrate an exceptional commitment to the teaching and mentoring of students. The candidate will be expected to teach courses at the undergraduate and graduate level in Japanese culture as well as specialized courses. The candidate will eligible for consideration for a leadership opportunity to develop graduate programming, including but not limited to, recruitment and career-oriented programs.

U Edinburgh IASH Fellowships (UK)

“Fellowships“Senior Anniversary Fellowship, Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities (IASH), University of Edinburgh, UK. Deadline: 28 February 2019.

 

To celebrate their 50th anniversary year, IASH has created three-month Fellowships for the most promising scholars in the arts, humanities and social sciences. For 2019-20, they seek applications centered on the place of the humanities in the 21st century to take forward inquiry in a cross-disciplinary way, perhaps at the outermost disciplinary boundaries of the humanities, arts and social sciences. £10,500 bursary, plus travel grants.

In addition, IASH offers Environmental Humanities Visiting Research Fellowships, IASH-SSPS (School of Social and Political Science) Research Fellowships, and Digital Scholarship Visiting Research Fellowships.

 

Sheila McNamee Fulbright

FulbrightsSheila McNamee is Professor of Communication at the University of New Hampshire. She submitted the following discussion of her Fulbright award.

In 2012 I was a Fulbright Specialist at the University of Caldas in Manizales, Colombia. The invitation arose because, during this period, I was supervising an Assistant Professor at the University of Caldas in her PhD work.  Her PhD research was on the re-integration of former child soldiers into civilian life.  The opportunity to work with her research group, CEDAT, provided a living laboratory where the constructionist ideas I write about could be put into practice.

Sheila McNamee in Colombia
Sheila McNamee (second from left in back row) with colleagues and students in Colombia.

The project consisted of training in a social constructionist stance aimed at undergraduate and graduate faculty of the University of Caldas. Focus was on exploring how a social constructionist approach could be applied to specific areas such as social work, family development, social sciences, social research, conflict resolution and mediation. I was engaged in offering seminars, workshops and consultation with research groups. While most of my work was with faculty, some activities were extended to students and professionals from the academic community. The faculty with whom I worked were expected to begin a reflective process on teaching, research and professional practices, from a social constructionist approach and apply the knowledge acquired during the training, within the undergraduate curriculum, graduate curriculum, and social extramural programs such as “Tutor Home” and the “Center for family Intervention.” I worked with several research groups to offer advice on the specific projects being carried out at the moment as well as guidance on new projects. I worked a good deal with one research group, CEDAT. They develop processes in the area of conflict, violence and coexistence within the context of the Colombian conflict.  This is one of the strategic areas of research at the University of Caldas.

My work with CEDAT focused on conflict resolution and mediation, from a constructionist perspective. These topics are central to CEDAT’s focus on reintegration into civilian life of children and young people detached from the Colombian armed conflict. I engaged dialogical workshops with specific groups of professors with a particular focus according to the programs and needs: (1) a seminar on social construction and social work aimed to professors of the department of human development; (2) a training Workshop on constructionist research addressed to professors assigned with various research groups. These activities included Master students; (3) a training workshop on dialogue, conflict resolution and mediation; (4) a training workshop on family intervention for professors assigned to the department of family studies and the Center for family intervention staff; and (5) a seminar open to the academic community on social constructionist theory.

While these are all the “formal” activities in which I engaged, my own learning was expanded tenfold thanks to this Fulbright.  It was exciting working with research groups who were focusing on the long-standing and crippling conflict in Colombia.  This was an opportunity to take my work beyond local community and organizational conflicts and see how it could be put to use in an enduring cultural struggle.  The experience transformed my work and provided countless connections to both scholars and practitioners interested in working with dialogic ways of generating new forms of understanding.

CFP Media & intersectionality

“PublicationCall for proposals: Media at the Intersection, to be edited by Theresa Carilli and Jane Campbell. Deadline: May 1, 2019.

Theresa Carilli and Jane Campbell are seeking book chapters for an edited collection that will examine intersectionality in the media.  Intersectionality, or intersectionality perspectives, “share as a common thread the recognition of multiple interlocking identities that are defined in terms of relative sociocultural power and privilege and shape people’s individual and collective identities and experiences” (Shields, 2008). They are interested in global perspectives that demonstrate how specific communities who have intersecting identities have been represented in the media.  This might include identities that cross gender and sexuality, ethnicity and religion, race and class, etc.  The goal will be to examine how interlocking identities have affected media depictions.  Please send inquiries to Theresa Carilli.

Theresa Carilli, Ph.D., Professor of Communication, and Jane Campbell, Ph.D., Professor of English, are both at Purdue University Northwest. They are the co-editors of Women and the Media: Diverse Perspectives; Challenging Images of Women and the Media; Queer Media Images; and Locating Queerness in the Media.  Currently, they are also editing a book series entitled Media, Culture and the Arts.

CFP SIETAR Australasia: Indigenous Peoples’ Contribution (Australia)

ConferencesCall for Proposals: SIETAR Australasia 2019: Indigenous Peoples’ Contribution in Australia and Globally. Canberra, Australia, March 22 – 23, 2019. Deadline: 28 February 2019.

Presented by SIETAR AUSTRALASIA and the Office of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Leadership and Strategy at the University of Canberra. Organizers want to hear from non-indigenous and indigenous people about indigenous peoples’ contribution to and in any area/field.

KC16 Migration Translated into Romanian

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#16: Migration, which Saskia Witteborn wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Gabriel Furmuzachi has now translated into Romanian.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC16 Migration_Romanian

Witteborn, S. (2019). Migrația [Romanian]. (G. Furmuzachi, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 16. Retrieved from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2019/01/kc16-migration_romanian.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Georgia Institute of Technology: Visiting Prof of Chinese (USA)

“JobVisiting Assistant Professor of Chinese, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA. Deadline: 25 February 2019.

The School of Modern Languages at the Georgia Institute of Technology invites applications for Visiting Assistant Professor of Chinese. This position is full-time with a 2/2 teaching load and is renewable for up to two years.   The successful candidate will have (1) a PhD in hand by August 1, 2019; (2) native or near native-level competence in Chinese; (3) an active research and publication agenda; and (4) documented evidence of successful teaching of Chinese language, at both lower and upper levels, particularly content-based language courses. The candidate will join a robust Chinese program, with  undergraduate majors and minors in Chinese, as well as graduate level instruction. The candidate may teach a variety of courses of interest, including Chinese-American and Chinese culture; cross- and intercultural studies (including languages for business, technology, science, and heritage learners); environmental and media studies; Chinese civilization, thought and philosophy; and the Chinese classics, as well as other specialized courses. The candidate will also be involved in graduate curriculum development in Chinese. Preferred areas of expertise include Chinese-American culture; Chinese literature, culture, history, and media; environmental and digital humanities; and the study of science and technology.

U Essex: International Business and Strategy (UK)

“JobProfessor of International Business and Strategy, Essex Business School, University of Essex, UK. Deadline: 3 March 2019.

Essex Business School is undertaking a major expansion of its teaching and research activities, and accordingly is seeking to make an additional appointment, at the Professorial level in the field of International Business or Strategy (Southend Campus). This key appointment will have a vital role in enhancing the School’s research profile, developing undergraduate and postgraduate teaching and supervision and extending the School’s profile regionally, nationally and internationally.

Taking the Moral High Ground

Resources in ICD“ width=Robles, J. S., & Castor, T. (2019). Taking the moral high ground: Practices for being uncompromisingly principledJournal of Pragmatics, 141, 116-129.

This article asks questions relevant to many contexts of intercultural dialogue: “What actually happens when people are in the midst of unyielding disagreement? How do people accomplish intractability in interaction, and what might this tell us about the social and practical achievement and function of seemingly-incompatible positions in conflict?”

Abstract: “We examine how participants in a moral conflict hold fast to their beliefs during a highly publicized moment in an ongoing social controversy. We apply discourse analysis to a video-recorded confrontation between a same-sex couple seeking a marriage license, and a county clerk refusing to provide the license for religious reasons, which took place after the overturning of the Defense of Marriage Act in the U.S.A. (and had prohibited same-sex couples from marrying).We examine how pragmatics of account avoidance sequences and framing are deployed in interaction to accomplish “being morally principled.” This case illustrates how mediated public conversations around social changes provide participants opportunities to perform moralities and define the terms of debate in relation to cultural institutions. We reflect on how the consequence of this event is a form of debate in which participants speak past each other ritualistically, constructing worldviews as incompatible and problems as unresolvable.”

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