Migration Policy Institute Job Ad: International Program (USA)

Job adsThe Migration Policy Institute (MPI), a nonpartisan, nonprofit think tank dedicated to the study of U.S. and international migration policies, seeks an exceptional Research Assistant to join its International Program in Washington, DC. Deadline: June 15, 2018.

MPI’s International Program conducts research and analysis on challenges facing local, national, and supranational governments, covering topics such as refugee protection and integration, skills and mobility, border management, social cohesion in an age of diversity, and the governance of migration. The research assistant’s primary responsibilities will be to assist with qualitative and quantitative research and provide programmatic support in several areas of MPI’s work. Salary and title will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.

U Liege Postdoc and PHD Scholarships (Belgium)

PostdocsTwo PhD Scholarships and One Postdoctoral Scholarship on Migrants’ Social Protection Strategies, Université de Liège (Belgium), Faculty of Social Sciences (FaSS), Centre for Ethnic and Migration Studies (CEDEM). Deadline: June 4, 2018.

Applications are invited for scholarships to work at doctoral and post-doctoral level as part of the Migration, Transnationalism and Social Protection in (post-)crisis Europe project (MiTSoPro).

  1. Two doctoral positions: full-time, fixed-term position available for 3 years (with possible extension)

  2. One post-doctoral position: full-time, fixed-term position available for 3 years

Using Technology to Aid Migration: MigApp

Applied ICDWith 250 million international migrants, and 750 million internal migrants, 1 in 7 people in the world now is a migrant (MigApp Data Sheet, 2017). The International Organization for Migration (IOM, the UN migration agency) has developed MigApp to provide a platform for migrants to use in sharing their experiences, as well as to access verified and accurate information. Migrants also gain a translation tool to use with healthcare professionals and a low-cost way to transfer money (necessary because international migrants from developing countries send home over USD$600 billion annually.). Governments gain a platform to use in directly informing migrants of policies, such as visa regulations. IOM gains a tool to get information about their programs directly to migrants, learn what information is most useful, and what else is needed by the population they serve.

IOM Definition of “Migrant”“IOM defines a migrant as any person who is moving or has moved across an international border or within a State away from his/her habitual place of residence, regardless of (1) the person’s legal status; (2) whether the movement is voluntary or involuntary; (3) what the causes for the movement are; or (4) what the length of the stay is. IOM concerns itself with migrants and migration‐related issues and, in agreement with relevant States, with migrants who are in need of international migration services.”

CFP Oxford Migration Conference (UK)

ConferencesCall for Papers | Oxford Migration Conference: Crossing borders / Crossing disciplines: Rethinking Inclusion, Exclusion, and Human Mobility. 17–18 May 2018, Worcester College, Oxford University, UK. Deadline: 20 April 2018.

Human mobility is accompanied by processes of inclusion and exclusion. Whether in large-scale economic processes or face-to-face encounters, navigating ethnic, cultural, religious, economic, or linguistic differences resulting from migration and mobility can be challenging for states, societies, and individuals alike.

What are the various scales and moments at which processes of inclusion and exclusion come to the fore? Who includes and who excludes? Where do processes of inclusion and exclusion take place? What effects do they have at the individual, regional, national or international levels?

This conference aims to generate new inter- and multi-disciplinary insights and ideas on the theme of inclusion/exclusion. We invite abstracts from researchers at all academic levels addressing processes of inclusion/exclusion in relation to human migration and mobility from all disciplinary perspectives.

Practitioners and policy-makers are welcome to submit their ideas, and contributions that feature applied or practical collaboration with groups or individuals outside of universities are particularly invited.

U Lugano Studentship: Migration, Diversity & Intercultural Communication (Switzerland)

FellowshipsUniversità della Svizzera italiana (USI), Lugano, Switzerland. Ph.D. Student and Research Assistant. Deadline: June 30, 2018; open until filled.

Applications invited for a fully funded, full time, 3-year doctoral position in migration, diversity and intercultural communication. The applicant will work on a project fully funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation. The candidate will join the research team of Prof. Jolanta Drzewiecka at the Institute for Public Communication.

The project advances a novel approach to migrant belonging by exploring how identity capital and emotions mediate Eritrean settled refugee’ identities and belonging in Switzerland. We will extend the understanding of belonging as a discursively, materially and emotionally habituated practice. The project connects multidimensional notions of capital and affect to migrant belonging within a material-affective-discursive approach. It adopts a transnational perspective on Eritreans settled in Switzerland to elucidate how regional, ethnic, migration generation, gender and class distinctions shape belonging. It employs ethnographic methodology.

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KC16 Migration Translated into Greek

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#16: Migration, which Saskia Witteborn wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Anastasia Karakitsou has now translated into Greek. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC16 Migration_GreekWitteborn, S. (2018). Migration [Greek]. (A. Karakitsou, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 16. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/12/kc16-migration_greek1.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

CFP Language & Borders Conference (UK)

ConferencesLANGUAGE AND BORDERS: RETHINKING MOBILITY, MIGRATION AND SPACE, UNIVERSITY OF BRISTOL (UK) 26 MARCH – 27 MARCH 2018
Deadline for abstracts: 14 November 2017

The widespread movement of people and their linguistic repertoires has contributed to growing pressure on the model of the nation-state and related notions of linguistically and culturally homogeneous societies. Supposed homogeneity of communities is contingent on the notion of the border as a device of containment. However, in light of increased population movement, recent multidisciplinary approaches seek to capture the complex qualities of the border as both a locus of mobility (a line to be crossed – a bridge) and a site of enclosure (an untraversable barrier – a wall). So what are borders, how are they constructed and how do they impact our lived experience? Additionally, how can sociolinguistic and cognate research enhance our understanding of the interface between language and borders?

In this context, it has become increasingly urgent to reconsider how ‘migration’ is theoretically conceptualized, especially because ‘migration’ itself has become a salient object of contemporary discourse. This objectification and frequent vilification of migration potentially casts a shadow on the complex and diverse forms of (im)mobility that social actors experience, be it in relation to their own (im)mobility or that of others. Discussion of the roles of borders, mobility and migration in sociolinguistic research encourages us to reflect on the broader concept of space, and on its role in the formation and perpetuation of language ideologies. At this conference, we aim to address a number of questions, including:

– What constitutes a border for sociolinguistic researchers? What linguistic practices do borderlanders engage in?
– As sociolinguists, what can we learn from multidisciplinary approaches to border studies? What insights can be drawn from advances in geography, sociology, history, anthropology, politics and cultural studies?
– How do different sociolinguistic methodological frameworks (qualitative, quantitative, mixed) address borderland scenarios.

Confirmed Keynote Speakers: Brigitta Busch (University of Vienna), Carmen Llamas (University of York), Clare Mar-Molinero (University of Southampton).

This conference invites contributions from researchers in a range of disciplinary backgrounds, whose work focuses on the role of language in relation to borders, mobility, migration, and/or space. The conference has been generously supported by the British Academy’s ’Tackling the UK’s International Challenges’ initiative, as part of an ongoing project by Dr James Hawkey (Bristol) and Dr Kristine Horner (Sheffield).

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Open City Fellowships (Belgium)

FellowshipsMigration in Europe has preoccupied policymakers and administrations, and prompted enormous policy reform, yet refugees and migrants are themselves often excluded from this policy debate and formulation, particularly those in more recent refugee and migrant populations. The Open City Fellowship responds to this need by supporting the leadership of refugees and migrants in policy development that directly affect urban integration.

The Open City Fellowship in this first year, will offer five fellowships. Four fellowships will involve collaborations with partner cities: Amsterdam, Athens, Barcelona, and Berlin. The fifth fellowship will be based in Brussels with a partner that specializes in refugee and migration policy within the European Union.

The aim is to improve integration through stronger participation of and consultation with refugee and migrant communities. Over time, our ambition is that Open City Fellows will become a cohort of experienced and recognized leaders who represent refugee and migrant communities, benefitting the individual fellows and the community more broadly.

The Open Society Foundations will pay Open City Fellows a stipend, will provide some funding for fellowship-related travel, and may cover other fellowship-related expenses during the course of the fellowship. The Open Society Foundations will additionally provide training and leadership development opportunities for the fellows. Fellowships will be 12 months, with the possibility of extending for an additional six months.

Eligibility Criteria

Eligible applicants must meet the following criteria:

  • have a background as a refugee or migrant
  • demonstrate a commitment to improving the lives of the refugee or migrant community and their integration through, for example, work, volunteering, organizing, or other activities
  • possess strong relationships with refugee or migrant communities in the city in which they are applying, as demonstrated through membership or other involvement in a group, organization, NGO, board of an NGO, council, association, initiative, or activities designed to serve refugee or migrant communities
  • currently be based in one of the fellowship cities (and applying for a fellowship in that same city): Amsterdam, Athens, Barcelona, Berlin, or Brussels
  • be legally entitled to accept a fellowship in current city of residence and be permitted to travel within the European Union
  • demonstrate civil society leadership potential
  • bachelor’s degree is strongly preferred (preferably with accreditation in the city where the fellow is applying)
  • available to start the fellowship in January 2018
  • meet additional eligibility criteria that may be stipulated by the Open Society Foundations

Applicants must meet the following language proficiency requirements:

  • proficient in English at a minimum B2 level
  • proficiency in the language of the city where they are applying (German C1; Greek, Dutch, Spanish, or Catalan B2)
  • fluency in the language of a refugee or migrant community is strongly preferred
Ineligibility Criteria

The Open City Fellowship does not fund enrollment in an academic institution for degree or non-degree study. Full-time students will not be eligible.

Applications will be accepted until September 15, 2017. Shortlisted candidates will be contacted by early October, and will be interviewed later that month.

Migration, Language and Dialogue

Guest PostsMigration, Language and Dialogue
by Gabriel Furmuzachi

Migration brings with it, no doubt about it, important changes in the lives of those who chose to leave. Identity is one these fundamental changes. One needs to find one’s place and one’s self in a new environment without the benefit of a tradition and without the support of one’s family, history and language. As an immigrant, one becomes another, one’s identity has to be reassessed, built up from scratch. We are not talking here about personal identity in the sense analytic philosophy considers it. Instead, our understanding of identity relies on narratives: we come to understand ourselves and our place in the world through stories we tell or are told about ourselves. The fabric of these stories gets torn once we decide or are forced to leave. We should strive to mend it and we think one can only do this dialogically. These are the issues we will try to discuss here.

We are going to quickly follow three accounts of immigrant lives. Then we will attempt to make sense of them by appealing to a couple of philosophical concepts, namely dialogue and cosmopolitanism, which we consider to be viable solutions to the difficulties brought about by migration.

The first account we’ll talk about is the one from Strangers to Ourselves by Julia Kristeva, the second, from Eva Hoffman’s autobiographical novel Lost in Translation and the third focusing on the immigrant stories documented by the Haitian/American writer Edwidge Danticat in her Create Dangerously: The Immigrant Writer at Work.

Read the full essay.

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PLURAL+ 2017 Youth Video Festival

Applied ICDDo you have something to say about the themes of diversity, migration, social inclusion, and xenophobia? Submit videos less than 5 minutes in length to the PLURAL+ 2017 Youth Video Festival. Deadline: June 4, 2017

PLURAL+ is a joint initiative of the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations (UNAOC) and the International Organization for Migration (IOM) with the support of a wide network of international partners.

View winning videos from past and present PLURAL+ Youth Video Festivals, chosen by an international jury and partners from thousands of submissions from around the globe.

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