KC16 Migration Translated into Greek

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#16: Migration, which Saskia Witteborn wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Anastasia Karakitsou has now translated into Greek. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC16 Migration_GreekWitteborn, S. (2018). Migration [Greek]. (A. Karakitsou, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 16. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/12/kc16-migration_greek1.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

CFP Language & Borders Conference (UK)

ConferencesLANGUAGE AND BORDERS: RETHINKING MOBILITY, MIGRATION AND SPACE, UNIVERSITY OF BRISTOL (UK) 26 MARCH – 27 MARCH 2018
Deadline for abstracts: 14 November 2017

The widespread movement of people and their linguistic repertoires has contributed to growing pressure on the model of the nation-state and related notions of linguistically and culturally homogeneous societies. Supposed homogeneity of communities is contingent on the notion of the border as a device of containment. However, in light of increased population movement, recent multidisciplinary approaches seek to capture the complex qualities of the border as both a locus of mobility (a line to be crossed – a bridge) and a site of enclosure (an untraversable barrier – a wall). So what are borders, how are they constructed and how do they impact our lived experience? Additionally, how can sociolinguistic and cognate research enhance our understanding of the interface between language and borders?

In this context, it has become increasingly urgent to reconsider how ‘migration’ is theoretically conceptualized, especially because ‘migration’ itself has become a salient object of contemporary discourse. This objectification and frequent vilification of migration potentially casts a shadow on the complex and diverse forms of (im)mobility that social actors experience, be it in relation to their own (im)mobility or that of others. Discussion of the roles of borders, mobility and migration in sociolinguistic research encourages us to reflect on the broader concept of space, and on its role in the formation and perpetuation of language ideologies. At this conference, we aim to address a number of questions, including:

– What constitutes a border for sociolinguistic researchers? What linguistic practices do borderlanders engage in?
– As sociolinguists, what can we learn from multidisciplinary approaches to border studies? What insights can be drawn from advances in geography, sociology, history, anthropology, politics and cultural studies?
– How do different sociolinguistic methodological frameworks (qualitative, quantitative, mixed) address borderland scenarios.

Confirmed Keynote Speakers: Brigitta Busch (University of Vienna), Carmen Llamas (University of York), Clare Mar-Molinero (University of Southampton).

This conference invites contributions from researchers in a range of disciplinary backgrounds, whose work focuses on the role of language in relation to borders, mobility, migration, and/or space. The conference has been generously supported by the British Academy’s ’Tackling the UK’s International Challenges’ initiative, as part of an ongoing project by Dr James Hawkey (Bristol) and Dr Kristine Horner (Sheffield).

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Open City Fellowships (Belgium)

FellowshipsMigration in Europe has preoccupied policymakers and administrations, and prompted enormous policy reform, yet refugees and migrants are themselves often excluded from this policy debate and formulation, particularly those in more recent refugee and migrant populations. The Open City Fellowship responds to this need by supporting the leadership of refugees and migrants in policy development that directly affect urban integration.

The Open City Fellowship in this first year, will offer five fellowships. Four fellowships will involve collaborations with partner cities: Amsterdam, Athens, Barcelona, and Berlin. The fifth fellowship will be based in Brussels with a partner that specializes in refugee and migration policy within the European Union.

The aim is to improve integration through stronger participation of and consultation with refugee and migrant communities. Over time, our ambition is that Open City Fellows will become a cohort of experienced and recognized leaders who represent refugee and migrant communities, benefitting the individual fellows and the community more broadly.

The Open Society Foundations will pay Open City Fellows a stipend, will provide some funding for fellowship-related travel, and may cover other fellowship-related expenses during the course of the fellowship. The Open Society Foundations will additionally provide training and leadership development opportunities for the fellows. Fellowships will be 12 months, with the possibility of extending for an additional six months.

Eligibility Criteria

Eligible applicants must meet the following criteria:

  • have a background as a refugee or migrant
  • demonstrate a commitment to improving the lives of the refugee or migrant community and their integration through, for example, work, volunteering, organizing, or other activities
  • possess strong relationships with refugee or migrant communities in the city in which they are applying, as demonstrated through membership or other involvement in a group, organization, NGO, board of an NGO, council, association, initiative, or activities designed to serve refugee or migrant communities
  • currently be based in one of the fellowship cities (and applying for a fellowship in that same city): Amsterdam, Athens, Barcelona, Berlin, or Brussels
  • be legally entitled to accept a fellowship in current city of residence and be permitted to travel within the European Union
  • demonstrate civil society leadership potential
  • bachelor’s degree is strongly preferred (preferably with accreditation in the city where the fellow is applying)
  • available to start the fellowship in January 2018
  • meet additional eligibility criteria that may be stipulated by the Open Society Foundations

Applicants must meet the following language proficiency requirements:

  • proficient in English at a minimum B2 level
  • proficiency in the language of the city where they are applying (German C1; Greek, Dutch, Spanish, or Catalan B2)
  • fluency in the language of a refugee or migrant community is strongly preferred
Ineligibility Criteria

The Open City Fellowship does not fund enrollment in an academic institution for degree or non-degree study. Full-time students will not be eligible.

Applications will be accepted until September 15, 2017. Shortlisted candidates will be contacted by early October, and will be interviewed later that month.

Migration, Language and Dialogue

Guest PostsMigration, Language and Dialogue
by Gabriel Furmuzachi

Migration brings with it, no doubt about it, important changes in the lives of those who chose to leave. Identity is one these fundamental changes. One needs to find one’s place and one’s self in a new environment without the benefit of a tradition and without the support of one’s family, history and language. As an immigrant, one becomes another, one’s identity has to be reassessed, built up from scratch. We are not talking here about personal identity in the sense analytic philosophy considers it. Instead, our understanding of identity relies on narratives: we come to understand ourselves and our place in the world through stories we tell or are told about ourselves. The fabric of these stories gets torn once we decide or are forced to leave. We should strive to mend it and we think one can only do this dialogically. These are the issues we will try to discuss here.

We are going to quickly follow three accounts of immigrant lives. Then we will attempt to make sense of them by appealing to a couple of philosophical concepts, namely dialogue and cosmopolitanism, which we consider to be viable solutions to the difficulties brought about by migration.

The first account we’ll talk about is the one from Strangers to Ourselves by Julia Kristeva, the second, from Eva Hoffman’s autobiographical novel Lost in Translation and the third focusing on the immigrant stories documented by the Haitian/American writer Edwidge Danticat in her Create Dangerously: The Immigrant Writer at Work.

Read the full essay.

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PLURAL+ 2017 Youth Video Festival

Applied ICDDo you have something to say about the themes of diversity, migration, social inclusion, and xenophobia? Submit videos less than 5 minutes in length to the PLURAL+ 2017 Youth Video Festival. Deadline: June 4, 2017

PLURAL+ is a joint initiative of the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations (UNAOC) and the International Organization for Migration (IOM) with the support of a wide network of international partners.

View winning videos from past and present PLURAL+ Youth Video Festivals, chosen by an international jury and partners from thousands of submissions from around the globe.

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Amparo Huertas Bailén Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesAmparo Huertas Bailén (Ph.D., UAB, Spain) is professor in the Department of Audiovisual Communication and Advertising at Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB) and director of the Institute of Communication at UAB (InCom-UAB).

Amparo HuertasShe is also member of the Table for the Diversity in Broadcasting (Audiovisual Council in Catalonia-Spain). Her research is focused on the relationship between culture and communication from the perspective of social minorities. The objective of most of her projects is to understand the cultural consumption of migrant population and its influence on their adaptation process in a new country.

Selected publications:
HUERTAS, A. (2016): “Culturas que conviven, ¿pero se interrelacionan?”, in LOBILLO, G.; CASTRO-HIGUERAS, A.; SEDEÑO, A.; AGUILERA, M. (eds.) Prácticas culturales y movimientos sociales en el Mediterráneo: ¿Un cambio de época? Málaga (Spain): Universidad de Málaga (pp. 13–22).

HUERTAS, A.; MARTÍNEZ, Y. (2016): “La adaptación de la población migrante desde sus consumos culturales”, in GERVASI, F. (ed.): Diversidades. Perspectivas multidisciplinarias para el estudio de la interculturalidad y el desarrollo social. Coahuila (México): Universidad Autónoma de Coahuila; Ediciones de Laurel (pp. 185‒210).

Huertas, A.; Martínez, Y. (2013): “La educación mediática como herramienta de integración social en contextos migratorios: estudio de casos a partir de mapeados de proyectos”, in Aranda,D.; Sánchez, F. ; Creus, S. (eds.): Educación, medios y cultura de la participación. Barcelona(Spain): Editorial UOC (pp. 263-278).

Huertas, A.; Martínez, Y. (2013): Maghrebi women in Spain: family roles and media consumption. Observatorio (OBS*) Journal, Special Issue (p. 111-127).

Cogo, D.; Elhajji, M.; Huertas, A. (eds.) (2012): Diásporas, migraciones, tecnologías de la comunicación e identidades transnacionales. Bellaterra (Spain): Institut de la Comunicació, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona.

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GHI West Fellowship: History of Migration (California)

PostdocsBinational Visiting Fellow Tandem Program in the History of Migration at GHI WEST in Berkeley

The German Historical Institute (GHI) is seeking applications for a Binational Visiting Fellow Tandem. The Fellowship program contributes to the creation of the new research network “Knowledge in Transit – Migrant’s Knowledge in Comparative Perspective” at the GHI’s branch office GHI WEST at the University of California, Berkeley.

A member institution of the Max Weber Foundation, the German Historical Institute Washington is a distinguished non-university affiliated historical research institute, conducting inter- and transdisciplinary research with a transatlantic focus. GHI WEST, which is located at UC Berkeley’s Institute of European Studies, will organize a series of programs and scholarly events aimed at facilitating cooperation and dialogue among North American and Germany researchers in the humanities and social sciences. GHI West’s research programs will focus on knowledge and migration in a broadly comparative perspective, addressing the experiences of many different migrant groups, transit lands, and receiving countries.

The GHI’s fellowship program promotes cutting-edge research in history and related disciplines and international exchange of scholars. For this purpose, the GHI in cooperation with the Institute of European Studies at UC Berkeley is now offering German and North American postdoctoral scholars the opportunity to develop a binational research tandem which links up two academics – one from Germany and one from North America – working on research in the field of history of migration. The projects should contain productive areas of overlap with the tandem partner either in their topics or in their conceptual frameworks. The new visiting fellow tandem program at GHI WEST presents an excellent opportunity for scholars from Germany and North America to develop their expertise by collaborating closely, to work with additional resources and to make connections with others in their fields. It is funded by the VolkswagenStiftung, one of Germany’s most important non-profit foundations.

The program is designed for postdoctoral historians from Germany and North America in the fields of history of migration preferably with an interest in the history of knowledge, and with an outstanding academic record. For German applicants, a good working knowledge of English is essential. In order to ensure successful collaboration, our preference is for applicants to already have identified their potential tandem partner. The GHI would also support candidates in finding potential Tandem partners. Preference will also be given to candidates doing original research for a new book project.

Starting in September 2017, the successful applicants will be in residence at GHI WEST at UC Berkeley for a nine-month fellowship roughly corresponding to the Berkeley academic year. They will be expected to conduct their research and fully participate in the academic life at GHI WEST. Most prominently, they are invited to participate in the annual Bucerius Lecture “Histories of Migration: Transatlantic and Global Perspectives” and the attached Young Scholars Forum. Further, in collaboration with the permanent staff at GHI WEST, they will organize an exploration workshop for the currently developing research network “Knowledge in Transit”.

As affiliated researchers at GHI WEST, the fellows will have access to the UC Berkeley academic and social facilities (library, databases, email address, office space at the IES, etc.) and are offered the opportunity to make use of further resources in the greater Bay Area – including the Magnes Collection, the Hoover Institution Library and Archives in Stanford or the National Archives/ Pacific Region in San Bruno – while pursuing their research agendas.

Funding will be provided for a 9-month stay at GHI WEST/ UC Berkeley. The monthly stipend will be 3,500 Euro per month (or the equivalent in USD). In addition, fellowship recipients will receive reimbursement for their round-trip economy airfare. The GHI regrets that it is unable to provide accommodation for its fellows.

The deadline for applications is April 1, 2017. To apply, please send a cover letter, a CV, a copy of the certificate of your most recently achieved qualification, a research project proposal (5 pages or 2,000 words max), and the names and contact details of two referees. While applicants may write in either English or German, we recommend that they use the language in which they are most proficient. We can accept applications in electronic form only. Please submit your documents in a single PDF file to: fellowships@ghi-dc.org

All candidates will be notified in early May 2017 of the result of their application. For more information, please contact: Bryan Hart (hart@ghi-dc.org).

EPRIE 2017: Migration, Integration & Belonging (South Korea & Japan)

Applications are being accepted for participation in EPRIE 2017: ‘Migration, integration, and belonging’, to be held from June 21 to July 3 in East Asia (South Korea and Japan).

As an intercultural exchange program, EPRIE (Exchange Program for Regional Integration in East Asia and Europe) aims to contribute through enhanced dialog to improving cooperation among neighboring countries in East Asia and Europe, and to support the process of integration in each region. By strengthening transnational relations, EPRIE shall actively contribute toward promoting international understanding.

Participants will compare historical developments before and after the Second World War, examine the political and social dimensions of mutual relations, and analyze relevant regional cooperation and challenges. Each topic will be dealt with various perspectives and will be presented with the assistance of specialists from the field of politics, economics, academia and media.

In addition, key competencies in intercultural cooperation will be mediated. Through intensive collaborations at the seminar, a network will be created that shall seek to serve long-term cooperation.

Organizer is the Korea Verband e.V., a politically independent association based in Berlin.

Eligibility

Target groups are young people aged between 25 and 35 years from Europe (mainly France, Germany, Poland) and East Asia (mainly China, Japan, Korea). Program participants will include young professionals, and postgraduate students in Master and Research degrees from the field of Area Studies as well as from the disciplines of History, Social and Communication Sciences, among others.

Application deadline will be on Sunday, March 26, 2017

Gizem Arat Researcher Profile

Gizem Arat Miss Gizem Arat is a final year Ph.D. student at the University of Hong Kong in the Department of Social Work and Social Administration. Prior to her Ph.D. journey, she obtained her MSW from the University of Pittsburgh, in the School of Social Work. After her MSW degree, she was passionate to expand her knowledge of Eastern settings to gain a dual perspective (East and West) on social work. Her current research areas include the promotion of social justice and social harmony, positive youth development, and resilience in ethnic minority youth in Asian and global contexts.

Miss Arat is interested in hiking, exploring new cultures and meeting new people with diverse backgrounds.

Recent Publications:

 

Arat, G., Hoang, A. P., Jordan, L. P., & Wong, P. W. C. (in press). A systematic review of studies on ethnic minority youth development in Hong Kong: An application of the ecological framework. [Social work and the ethnic minorities in China]. China Journal of Social Work, 9(3), 1-20. doi: 10.1080/17525098.2017.1254716

Arat, G., Liu, L. L., & Wong, P. W. C. (2016). Culturally relevant protective and risk factors of youth risk behaviors among Pakistani and Indian students in Hong Kong: A focus group study. Journal of Transcultural Nursing. doi: 10.1177/1043659616668397 (IF= 1.111)

Narine Nora Kerelian Researcher Profile

Narine KerelianMs. Narine Nora Kerelian is a Ph.D. student at the University of Hong Kong, Department of Social Work and Social Administration. She completed her M.A. at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey, California. Ms. Kerelian holds a B.A. in Global Studies and French from the University of California Santa Barbara, and a Certificate in Intercultural Foundations from the Intercultural Communication Institute in Portland, Oregon.

Ms. Kerelian’s research interests are highly-skilled migration, global cities, cultural competency/ adaptation, and migrant integration. Her dissertation focuses on Hong Kong, exploring the sense of place of British and American young transmigrant professionals through their residence, work, and leisure places using qualitative approaches.

Ms. Kerelian has studied, worked and lived in the United States, Europe, and Asia. She has traveled to over 35 countries and enjoys seeing new places and trying new cuisines. She is fluent in Armenian, English and French.

Kerelian, N. N. (2016). Placing diversity: Graduate encounters with group work. Social Work with Groups, 1-6. doi:10.1080/01609513.2015.1065385

Kerelian, N. N., & Jordan, L. P. (2016). The highly-skilled in Hong Kong ‘Asia’s world city’ In Q. Xu & L. P. Jordan (Eds.), Migrant workers: Social identity, occupational challenges and health practices (pp. 191-212). New York: Nova.

 

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