The Urgency of Intersectionality

Applied ICDGust Yep described the concept of intersectionality in Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 49, published on this site in 2015. For those who want more information about the concept, Kimberlé Crenshaw, the lawyer who invented the term, gave a TED Talk in 2016,  The Urgency of Intersectionality. (She also coined the term “Critical race theory.”) Among other comments, she says: “When there’s no name for a problem, you can’t see a problem. When you can’t see a problem, you can’t solve it.”

A later and longer discussion of intersectionality is this:

Yep, G. A. (2016). Toward thick (er) intersectionalities: Theorizing, researching, and activating the complexities of communication and identities. In K. Sorrells & S. Sekimoto (Eds.), Globalizing intercultural communication: A reader (pp. 86-94). Sage Publications.

Key Concept #49: Intersectionality by Gust Yep

Key Concepts in ICDThe next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. Lists organized  chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.Key Concept #49: Intersectionality Yep, G. (2015). Intersectionality. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 49. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2015/02/key-concept-intersectionality.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


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