CFP Diversity, Intersectionality, Transnationality & Pedagogy

“PublicationCall for Papers: Diversity, Intersectionality, Transnationality, and Pedagogy, Communication Education Forum, to be edited by Ahmet Atay (College of Wooster). Deadline: November 15, 2020.

The discourse of cultural diversity has emerged as a vital component of communication pedagogy. However, the current political events and social contexts that surround us—such as the Black Lives Matter movement, ongoing negative immigration discourse, changing visa policies to limit the experiences of immigrants and international students, as well as homophobia and transphobia within and outside of higher education—invite us, as communication education scholars, to respond to these exigencies and be more self-reflexive of our pedagogies. Perhaps more than ever before, the notion of cultural diversity is an instrumental part of communication pedagogy and of what we do in the classroom.

To understand the current political moment and the cultural dynamics that are shaping our interactions and pedagogies within and outside of the classroom, there is a need for a dynamic intersectional approach to our scholarship. Our classrooms are political because as faculty and students, we bring our culturally and politically marked bodies into the classroom. Hence, how we teach and learn, as well as what we do with the information we share, is always political, ideological, contextual, and influenced by history. Furthermore, our identities are fluid, ever-changing, and intersectional. The pedagogies that we employ must recognize this complex positionality and intersectionality.

Building on the discourse of critical communication pedagogy and critical intercultural communication pedagogy, this forum aims to provide a scholarly space to engage with critical approaches and intersectionality in the context of communication pedagogy. This forum invites scholars to engage with current political and cultural dynamics and how they are embodied in the classroom. Authors should address the following two questions in their essays:

    1. How can intersectionality help us to make sense of the current political moment and cultural dynamics in the classroom?
    2. In what ways can critical frameworks (e.g., transnational, postcolonial, decolonizing, feminist, and queer approaches) individually or intersectionally help communication teachers to engage with diversity?

The forum will consist of four essays. Essays should not exceed 1,000 words, including references. Please direct forum questions to Ahmet Atay. Please email a blinded copy of your essay by November 15, 2020, to Melissa Broeckelman-Post, Consulting Editor for Forums.

KC49 Intersectionality Translated into Spanish

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#49: Intersectionality, which Gust Yep published in English in 2015, and which Daniel Mateo Ordóñez has now translated into Spanish.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. Lists organized chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC49 Intersectionality_Spanish

Yep, G. (2020). Interseccionalidad. (D. M. Ordóñez, trans.) Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 49. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2020/09/kc49-intersectionality_spanish.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

KC49 Intersectionality Translated into German

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#49: Intersectionality, which Gust Yep published in English in 2015, and which Alina Timofte has now translated into German.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. Lists organized chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC49 Intersectionality_GermanYep, G. (2020). Intersektionalität. (A. Timofte, trans.) Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 49. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2020/07/kc49-intersectionality_german.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

CFP Media & intersectionality

“PublicationCall for proposals: Media at the Intersection, to be edited by Theresa Carilli and Jane Campbell. Deadline: May 1, 2019.

Theresa Carilli and Jane Campbell are seeking book chapters for an edited collection that will examine intersectionality in the media.  Intersectionality, or intersectionality perspectives, “share as a common thread the recognition of multiple interlocking identities that are defined in terms of relative sociocultural power and privilege and shape people’s individual and collective identities and experiences” (Shields, 2008). They are interested in global perspectives that demonstrate how specific communities who have intersecting identities have been represented in the media.  This might include identities that cross gender and sexuality, ethnicity and religion, race and class, etc.  The goal will be to examine how interlocking identities have affected media depictions.  Please send inquiries to Theresa Carilli.

Theresa Carilli, Ph.D., Professor of Communication, and Jane Campbell, Ph.D., Professor of English, are both at Purdue University Northwest. They are the co-editors of Women and the Media: Diverse Perspectives; Challenging Images of Women and the Media; Queer Media Images; and Locating Queerness in the Media.  Currently, they are also editing a book series entitled Media, Culture and the Arts.

The Urgency of Intersectionality

Applied ICDGust Yep described the concept of intersectionality in Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 49, published on this site in 2015. For those who want more information about the concept, Kimberlé Crenshaw, the lawyer who invented the term, gave a TED Talk in 2016,  The Urgency of Intersectionality. (She also coined the term “Critical race theory.”) Among other comments, she says: “When there’s no name for a problem, you can’t see a problem. When you can’t see a problem, you can’t solve it.”

A later and longer discussion of intersectionality is this:

Yep, G. A. (2016). Toward thick (er) intersectionalities: Theorizing, researching, and activating the complexities of communication and identities. In K. Sorrells & S. Sekimoto (Eds.), Globalizing intercultural communication: A reader (pp. 86-94). Sage Publications.

Key Concept #49: Intersectionality by Gust Yep

Key Concepts in ICDThe next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. This is KC49: Intersectionality by Gust Yep. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists organized  chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.Key Concept #49: Intersectionality Yep, G. (2015). Intersectionality. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 49. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2015/02/key-concept-intersectionality.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.