Sabancı U: Conflict Analysis & Resolution (Turkey)

“JobFaculty position in Conflict Analysis and Resolution, Sabancı University, Istanbul, Turkey. Deadline: Open until filled (position begins fall 2020).

The Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) at Sabancı University invites applications for open-rank, full-time or visiting positions from outstanding scholars specialized in

  • conflict resolution/transformation (particularly in one or more of the following areas: peace psychology; scientific study of peace and conflict; dynamics of cooperation; approaches to peacemaking (negotiation, mediation, facilitation); theories of applied conflict resolution; processes and mechanisms for solving and transforming conflicts).

  • conflict resolution/transformation practices (particularly applicants whose research and teaching focus on conflict resolution skills, such as listening, reframing, negotiation and mediation).

The successful candidate will be expected to conduct high-impact research, undertake grant applications, supervise graduate students, engage in citizenship activities, and teach graduate and undergraduate courses. Applicants will be evaluated based on both past performance and future potential in these areas.

Sabancı University is a private, department-free, innovative academic institution located in Istanbul. The University is strongly committed to interdisciplinary research and teaching both at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The medium of instruction is English with a teaching load of two courses per semester. The University admits top-ranking students for its undergraduate programs through a centralized university entrance examination. Faculty members are provided with highly competitive salary and benefits including an annual personal research fund, health insurance, and housing on campus (or housing allowance).

U Kent: Lecturer in International Security or Conflict Analysis (UK)

“JobLecturer in International Security and/or Conflict Analysis, School of Politics & International Relations, University of Kent, Canterbury, UK. Deadline: 9 June 2019.

The School of Politics and International Relations is seeking to appoint a Lecturer committed to excellence in teaching and research with an ability to teach in the field of international security and/or conflict analysis. The successful candidate will be required to teach at both the undergraduate and postgraduate levels. The post holder will also contribute to the delivery and development of specialist modules on their research areas at undergraduate and/or postgraduate level.

The successful candidate will be expected to make a significant contribution to the School’s existing strong research culture, research impact and high level of student engagement. Additionally the candidate will be expected to apply for external research and/or enterprise funding and to play an active role in building the research capacity of the School’s Conflict Analysis Research Centre (CARC) and/or Global Europe Centre (GEC). The ability to convene a post-graduate level module in qualitative research methods that meets ESRC training requirements would be an advantage.

Taking the Moral High Ground

Resources in ICD“ width=Robles, J. S., & Castor, T. (2019). Taking the moral high ground: Practices for being uncompromisingly principledJournal of Pragmatics, 141, 116-129.

This article asks questions relevant to many contexts of intercultural dialogue: “What actually happens when people are in the midst of unyielding disagreement? How do people accomplish intractability in interaction, and what might this tell us about the social and practical achievement and function of seemingly-incompatible positions in conflict?”

Abstract: “We examine how participants in a moral conflict hold fast to their beliefs during a highly publicized moment in an ongoing social controversy. We apply discourse analysis to a video-recorded confrontation between a same-sex couple seeking a marriage license, and a county clerk refusing to provide the license for religious reasons, which took place after the overturning of the Defense of Marriage Act in the U.S.A. (and had prohibited same-sex couples from marrying).We examine how pragmatics of account avoidance sequences and framing are deployed in interaction to accomplish “being morally principled.” This case illustrates how mediated public conversations around social changes provide participants opportunities to perform moralities and define the terms of debate in relation to cultural institutions. We reflect on how the consequence of this event is a form of debate in which participants speak past each other ritualistically, constructing worldviews as incompatible and problems as unresolvable.”