Changes to Social Media for CID

social media logosAs a result of the efforts of Min He over the past 6 months to learn about the followers of the Center for Intercultural Dialogue on various social media, it has become obvious that there is very little activity on either Google+ or Pinterest, with only a few dozen followers on each site (compared to the hundreds on LinkedIn and Twitter, and over a thousand who are currently members of the CID Facebook group). The CID accounts on both of these platforms will therefore be terminated as of April 15, 2017.

Please subscribe to CID on any of the other social media platforms: Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, or YouTube, either by clicking on these links, or the logos on the right side of the page.

Or subscribe directly to WordPress via email (through the link on the top right of any page). Once you have done that, you can “manage” your subscription, choosing whether you want a daily or weekly update sent to your inbox. (As a general clarification: CID does not manage an email list; each subscriber manages their own preferences.)

If you have any difficulties and want to talk to a person, just email me directly.

My apologies for the time these changes will require.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

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New CID Series: Constructing Intercultural Dialogues

Recent events suggest that the world needs more people to listen to one another and to think about what they share rather than quite so many people ignoring one another, or making false assumptions about others. We must spend more effort promoting social cohesion (that is, emphasizing similarities across group boundaries) rather than leaving uncontested the frequent assumption that all cultural others have different agendas and share few of our values.

Intercultural dialogues are often assumed to require substantial effort in terms of organization, and to involve a lot of people having multiple interactions over a long period of time. This is certainly one model. However, many people have at least brief intercultural dialogues frequently, and easily. The goal of this new publication series is to invite a wide range of people to tell the story of a time when intercultural dialogue occurred, whether it was of the short and easy variety or the long and structured variety, providing models for those who do not frequently participate in intercultural dialogues.

In either model, intercultural dialogue is jointly constructed by participants, requiring cooperation to engage in new and different ways of interacting. It is more important to start from a position of curiosity and a willingness to listen than it is to undergo formal training (although at least some instruction or guidance is always useful).

Many of the people affiliated with the Center for Intercultural Dialogue consider themselves to be interculturalists. Many have lived and/or worked in multiple countries, speak multiple languages, and/or study intercultural interactions generally, if not intercultural dialogues specifically. The goal of this new series is to harvest the knowledge gained by this group and share it publicly.

To ensure consistency, all authors are asked to follow the same outline:
Context – How did this episode come about? Who was involved, in what circumstances and location? What started the dialogue? Where did it happen?
Participants – Since people have multiple identities, what are the cultural backgrounds that proved relevant? Provide some detail about the participants; for example, what language(s) were they speaking? What was your role in this episode? (observer, facilitator, translator, participant?)
Description – How did the events unfold? Thinking now about what happened, what were the key parts of the process? Any interventions? Any sticking points?
Dialogic features – What made it dialogue? That is, how was it different from ordinary conversation, what stood out as noteworthy that might be replicated in future?
Lessons learned – What make it work as dialogue? What things could have been done better? What lessons would you pass on to others?

If you are interested in writing up a case study for this series and have previously published with the Center for Intercultural Dialogue, just write it up and send it in. If you have never published with CID, it might be best to first send a note introducing yourself, and briefly explaining what it is you would like to write about, receiving approval before you take the time to write.

As with Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, this new series will not be subject to blind peer review, but rather will be accepted at the discretion of the Director. The logic is that these are not major research publications, but rather small notes intended for quick publication. No one is likely to earn tenure on the strength of such publications as these, but they have a different goal, that of sharing information rapidly and widely.

A few technical notes:
• These case studies should be based on personal experience.
• These should be written clearly using a minimum of jargon or technical terms, so that anyone can understand them, without quotes, footnotes, or references. Instead, the focus is on describing your own experience.
• Case studies should be 1-2 pages long, and will be edited and formatted to a common template prior to publication.
• Please use the section headings indicated in the outline above.
• On confidentiality: there’s no need to provide other people’s real names if that’s not essential to the story you’re telling.
• On copyright: authors retain copyright of their own work, and may publish in another format in future.
• If you have other questions, just ask.

These case studies will be published in English. However, given that translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue have received so many views, anyone who wishes to translate their own narrative into another language (or two) is invited to provide that as well, or to send a note explaining that it will follow. If you want to volunteer to translate others’ case studies into a language in which you are fluent, send in a note before starting, just to confirm no one else is working on the same one.

Thank you for taking the time to share your experience and knowledge.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com

NOTE: The series has now started, and is to be found under Publications in the top menu; a direct link is here.

New Assistant to the Director of CID: Min He

Min He photoCID has recently welcomed Min He as the new Assistant to the Director of the Center. Min is a Master’s student in Intercultural and Inter-national Communication at Royal Roads University in Canada. She is currently completing an internship program through her work at CID. She will conduct a marketing research study on subscribers to the Center, translate several Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue and upgrade several aspects of CID’s presence on social media platforms. Min is excited to join the Center and learn new skills.

Min is originally from Beijing, China. She transferred two years of academic credits to Saint Mary’s University in Canada, completing her BA in English Literature there. During her undergraduate years, Min gained broad volunteer experience with international visitors, which led her to decide to pursue a graduate degree in Intercultural Communication. Being an intercultural Communication practitioner, especially when the global economy is booming, means to effectively build conversations among different cultural groups. Min’s academic degrees have expanded her potential abilities in this field, as well as fundamentally oriented her future career path.

Min looks forward to contributing to CID and devoting her efforts to helping the Center foster good connections with subscribers as a result of learning more about who they are.

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CID has passed 2000 subscribers!

 

Thanks to all of you who have subscribed to the Center for Intercultural Dialogue’s website, we have crossed the 2000 mark!

2000 followers

This number includes those who have followed through WordPress (available only to those with their own WP sites), those who have signed up for email notifications, as well as those who follow through Facebook, Twitter, or Google+. WordPress cannot directly track those who have joined the CID LinkedIn group (currently at 274 members), or who follow on YouTube or Pinterest, so the actual number of subscribers in fact now totals 2349! It took 3 1/2 years to reach 1000, but only another 2 years to pass 2000. Likes on Facebook, retweets on Twitter, and sharing of posts all expand our reach, and are much appreciated.

Researcher profiles and the CID publication series Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue receive considerable numbers of views, as do guest posts (which you can access through the word cloud at the bottom left of any page). Even the Wikipedia article on CID is read half a dozen times each day.

As the number of followers has increased, email sent to CID has increased as well. The largest single number of viewers are from the US, but it is people outside the US who most often write in with requests of various sorts. As an example, the past week brought emails from Colombia, Switzerland, Nigeria, Greece, and New Zealand; the week before that from Ghana, Hong Kong, Malta, Belgium and Serbia. I try to answer all emails within a few days, and to post relevant information that is submitted about conferences, publication opportunities, fellowships, grants, post-docs, etc. within a week, though occasionally there is a longer line.

I very much appreciate your support.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue [at] gmail.com

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Key Concept #61: ВЫХАВАННЕ by Liubou Uladykouskaja

The next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. The goal is to expand the concepts available to discussions of intercultural dialogue. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF.

Key Concept #61 BblXABAHHE by Liubou Uladykouskaja

Uladykouskaja, L. (2015). ВЫХАВАННЕ. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 61. Available from https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.org/publications

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. Prior concepts are available on the main publications page. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept. Feel free to propose terms in any language, especially if they expand our ability to discuss an aspect of intercultural dialogue that is not easy to translate into English.

CID is 5 years old!

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue was officially established in March 2010, so this month marks our fifth anniversary. As a reminder, CID grew out of the National Communication Association’s Summer Conference on Intercultural Dialogue, held at Maltepe University in Istanbul, Turkey, July 22–26, 2009. When participants wanted a way to encourage further international connections for intercultural research, a proposal was brought before the Council of Communication Associations‘ Board of Directors at their March 2010 meeting to create the Center for Intercultural Dialogue, which was approved. I was appointed Director of CID at that same meeting, and asked to prepare necessary documents and establish an Advisory Board, all of which was approved at the CCA meeting in September 2010. (Further history has already been published, so it won’t be repeated here.)

This WordPress site was established in 2010, with other social media following in 2011 (Facebook), 2013 (Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, Google+, Pinterest), and 2014 (a Wikipedia article). Nearly 2000 people now follow CID across one or more of these fora, and requests now arrive every few days to post information to this community.

Thanks to all those who have made this project possible, to all those who have connected with CID in some fashion, and to all those who have contributed to CID in any way.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director

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Key Concept #49: Intersectionality by Gust Yep

The next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. The goal is to expand the concepts available to discussions of intercultural dialogue. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF.

Key Concept #49: Intersectionality Yep, G. (2015). Intersectionality. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 49. Available from https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.org/publications

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. Prior concepts are available on the main publications page. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept. Feel free to propose terms in any language, especially if they expand our ability to discuss an aspect of intercultural dialogue that is not easy to translate into English.

Key Concept #48: Cultural Accommodation Theory by Howard Giles

The next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. The goal is to expand the concepts available to discussions of intercultural dialogue. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF.

Key Concept #48: Communication Accommodation Theory

Giles, H. (2015). Cultural accommodation theory. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 48. Available from https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.org/publications

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. Prior concepts are available on the main publications page. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept. Feel free to propose terms in any language, especially if they expand our ability to discuss an aspect of intercultural dialogue that is not easy to translate into English.

Key Concept #47: Cultural Contracts Theory by Ronald L. Jackson II

The next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. The goal is to expand the concepts available to discussions of intercultural dialogue. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF.

kc47-sm

Jackson, R. L. (2015). Cultural contracts theory. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 47. Available from https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.org/publications

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. Prior concepts are available on the main publications page. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept. Feel free to propose terms in any language, especially if they expand our ability to discuss an aspect of intercultural dialogue that is not easy to translate into English.

Key Concept #46: Politeness by Sara Mills

The next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. The goal is to expand the concepts available to discussions of intercultural dialogue. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF.

Key Concept #46 Politeness by Sara Mills

Mills, Sara (2015). Politeness. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 46. Available from https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.org/publications

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. Prior concepts are available on the main publications page. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept. Feel free to propose terms in any language, especially if they expand our ability to discuss an aspect of intercultural dialogue that is not easy to translate into English.