3rd Prize CID Video Competition: Sahiti Bonam

CID Video CompetitionCID’s first video competition is now over, and the judges have reviewed all the videos. As a reminder, the instructions were to answer the question “What does intercultural dialogue look like?” in 90-120 seconds, on video.

Sahiti Bonam

Third prize goes to Sahiti Bonam, who is a BA student in Visual Studies at Temple University (USA). Her website provides further information about her, and examples of her work.

 

 

Title: Accent

Description: “Accent is defined as “a distinctive manner of expression” according to the Merriam-Webster dictionary. The idea for this project is to question people whether they have an accent or not. I am using video as my medium for this project in order to capture the visuals and sounds of people saying whether or not they have an accent and to label where they are from. I think the idea of my project can be well reflected through video because it allows the viewer to determine whether an accent is a regional concept or a minority vs majority. As a stylistic choice, the video was taken up close of the participant, where only the mouth and nose were visible. The purpose of this was to be in the gray area of anonymity and identity. The bottom of each clip is the place where the participant is from. Some people in the video were my friends and others were completely random. I wanted to make sure that I didn’t guide or push the answers of the participants, so there would be a diversity in opinion.

From a linguistics perspective, everyone has an accent. This project was inspired by one of the lectures in my Intercultural Communication course, where we watched a documentary called “American Tongues”. The documentary was about the various accents of people in USA. My interest was piqued when some people interviewed in the documentary said that they have an accent, need to change their accent depending on their environment, or believe that they don’t have an accent.

I am interested in this topic because I believe that I do have an accent and that my accent changes depending on who I am with. My accent is influenced by the places I have lived and the people I am with. The change in accent and to be understood is called “code-switching”, which is mainly done so that the accent is standardized for the majority of people to understand you or when you are with a specific background of people.”

There were first, second and third place winners, as well as 3 videos that merited awards of excellence. Each of these is being highlighted in a separate post, as they warrant our attention. My thanks to the judges of the competition, professionals who made time to review student videos. Thanks also to all the competitors, who took the time to really think about the question of how to show intercultural dialogue visually.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

2nd Prize CID Video Competition: Class 5B

CID Video CompetitionCID’s first video competition is now over, and the judges have reviewed all the videos. As a reminder, the instructions were to answer the question “What does intercultural dialogue look like?” in 90-120 seconds, on video.

Class 5B

Second prize goes to Class 5B, the final year at the School of Arts “Aldo Passoni,” Turin (Italy). Students have 3 main fields of study: Graphic and Editorial Book Design, Industrial Design, and Textile and Fashion Design. Judges praised this video for creativity and originality, as well as for complexity and professionalism, said it was beautifully shot, and particularly mentioned both the music and the use of color.

Title: What does intercultural dialogue look like? It’s InterCOLORal Dialogue!

Description: Given that we are a multicultural and multilingual Institute, we decided to develop our video focusing on different words in different languages, and as we are a School of Arts we paired each word with a specific color. Indeed, works of art are a whole made up of different colors and brushstrokes, and this is how we understand intercultural dialogue: the participation and the contribution of each of us to a common project, that of mutual understanding. Within such a perspective, we view intercultural dialogue in the widest sense of a dialogue across all types of cultures linked not only to nationality or ethnicity, but also as a dynamic able to challenge all stereotypes regarding gender, sexual orientation, etc.

Specific credits:
Direction & Editing: Stefano Millesimo
Recording & Sound Engineering: Edoardo Denunzio, Bruno Alicata, Matteo Rizzo
Set: Bruno Alicata
Make-Up & Colors: Michela Geremia
Casting: Giorgia Culotta
Texts: Martina Dinoi

There were first, second and third place winners, as well as 3 videos that merited awards of excellence. Each of these is being highlighted in a separate post, as they warrant our attention. My thanks to the judges of the competition, professionals who made time to review student videos. Thanks also to all the competitors, who took the time to really think about the question of how to show intercultural dialogue visually.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

1st Prize CID Video Competition: Jinsuk Kim

CID Video CompetitionCID’s first video competition is now over, and the judges have reviewed all the videos. As a reminder, the instructions were to answer the question “What does intercultural dialogue look like?” in 90-120 seconds, on video.

Jinsuk KimFirst prize goes to Jinsuk Kim, a Master’s student in Media Studies and Production at Temple University (USA).  He has just graduated, and gotten married (thus this photo). He works as Director of Media and Communications at K-Global Accelerator, and has prior experience as a video editor, and assistant producer. Judges praised the camera work and use of music especially, and liked the uncommon short narrative film format, as well as the fact that his video clearly shows a great example of intercultural dialogue.

 

Title: Jin

Description: “My video is a personal narrative (short film), based on my own experiences, that looks at cultural differences and language issues that foreigners experience in America. The purpose of this project is to encourage foreigners who are have a hard time with cultural differences and language issues in America and to help Americans understand foreigners better. I hope this video serves as a bridge between Americans and foreigners.”

There were first, second and third place winners, as well as 3 videos that merited awards of excellence. Each of these is being highlighted in a separate post, as they warrant our attention. My thanks to the judges of the competition, professionals who made time to review student videos. Thanks also to all the competitors, who took the time to really think about the question of how to show intercultural dialogue visually.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

CID Video Competition Judges

CID Video CompetitionThe CID Video Competition deadline has come and gone, videos have been submitted from around the world, and the judges are now reviewing them. My thanks to the judges for taking the time to watch and critique all the videos. It’s clear the greatest reward for all those who entered the competition is getting their work in front of these accomplished professionals!

Jim D'AdderioJim D’Addario has been an awarding winning producer for the Walt Disney Company since 1995.  He started his career with Disney Interactive as a Production Supervisor on multiple edutainment projects, including the best sellers Lion King Activity Center and Toy Story Activity Center.  Jim was than recruited by Walt Disney Imagineering to produce sound tracks and interactive projects for Walt Disney World, Tokyo DisneySea and Walt Disney Studios Park in Paris.  Jim was instrumental in the design of The Buzz Lightyear ride at Disneyland park and The Winnie the Pooh Ride at Walt Disney World. His most memorable moment came when he worked with the iconic Sherman Brothers (of Mary Poppins fame) to produce the new soundtrack for the ride.  Jim has recorded with some of the most recognizable talent in the industry including Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck, Rafiki, and Tigger! Jim then jumped ship to work in the online space with Disney Cruise Line, Disneyworld.com, and Disneyland.com creating the first immersive sites for those properties.  Jim’s current position is with Walt Disney Parks and Resorts, Global Broadcast, as a Senior Producer of television and radio commercials, trailers, First-Look programming, in-room videos, online videos, and airport interactive displays. Last year Jim picked up his second Addy award for work on Hong Kong Disneyland.

Zsuzsanna Gellér-VargaZsuzsanna Gellér-Varga studied filmmaking at UC Berkeley (USA) as a Fulbright scholar. Her Screw Your Courage documentary won awards at several US film festivals and was broadcast on public TV. She worked for the New York Times Television as a video-journalist and later directed documentaries including, Once They Were Neighbours, Synagogue for Sale, and Mr. Mom, which were screened internationally and broadcast on public TV. She teaches documentary ethics at the international Masters program, DocNomads. She lives in Budapest Hungary.

Kent GibsonKent Gibson is an Emmy and Grammy winning producer and sound designer.  He also is a forensic audio, video, and facial recognition expert. He has a BA from Yale and an MA from Stanford University Film School. He is Owner of Soundesign, owner of ForensicAV.com, was a founding partner in Rosebud Films, and co-founder and president of Cosmos Studios. He has won a Prime Time Emmy Award for the PBS series COSMOS, and been nominated for an Emmy as Executive Producer for Cosmic Journey – the Voyager Interstellar Mission and Message (A&E). He was Sound Designer and Mixer for the Emmy Award winning Galileo, Battle for the Heavens on NOVA. He has a Grammy Award Citation for Gimme Some Truth, the Making of John Lennon’s Imagine Album – long form video; a Grammy Award for Physical starring Olivia Newton-John – long form video disk; a Grammy for The Heart of Rock & Roll, Starring Huey Lewis & The News – long form video; a Grammy Award Citation for Rod Stewart – long form video; as well as multiple Clio Awards and other Emmy Nominations.

Leena JayaswalLeena Jayaswal is an award-winning photographer and documentarian with deep expertise and interest in issues that intersect race, representation and identity. Her films have been broadcast throughout the country on over 100 PBS affiliates through National Educational Telecommunications Association, and through New Day Films. She was awarded the prestigious Gracie Allen Award from the American Women in Radio and Television. Crossing Lines is currently part of the Smithsonian’s Beyond Bollywood exhibition that has been traveling around the country. Her work has been featured in critical film festivals and newspapers for the Indian diaspora. Her award wining photography has been nationally recognized in galleries around the country, in solo shows at the International Visions Gallery and Gandhi Memorial Center in Washington, D.C., as well as numerous group shows. Currently Jayaswal is co-directing, co-producing with Caty Borum Chattoo a feature length documentary, Mixed, on what it means to be mixed race in America. Jayaswal is a Professor in the Film and Media Arts Division of the at American University. She is the director of the photography concentration and the Inclusion Officer in the School of Communication.

Stéphane Lam is a photo journalist covering all sorts of events involving people who make a significant contribution in their field. Passionate about film and history, he also conducts interviews all around the globe to gather singular and inspirational stories. He works with “The International Post” and is based in Paris, France and Los Angeles, CA.

David MagdaelDavid Magdael has more than 18 years of experience in public relations, strategic planning, development, marketing, community outreach and entertainment and media relations in North America, Europe and Asia. As founder and president of DAVID MADGAEL & ASSOCIATES, INC, Magdael continues to specialize in documentaries, indie films, directors, and public affairs.  From developing Oscar® campaigns to festival strategies to theatrical and broadcast press unit publicity, his company has emerged as an important entertainment communications firm boasting a client roster including numerous Oscar® winning and nominated documentary, animated and short films and festival standouts. Magdael is also a member of the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences and is the Co-Director for the Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival since 1997. He serves as a mentor at the Sundance Institute Documentary Producers Lab and continues to share his expertise in panels and workshops at Sundance Film Festival, South by Southwest (SXSW), Full Frame Film Festival, Silver Docs, Hawaii International Film Festival, Los Angeles Film Festival, AFI Festival Los Angeles, Ashland International Film Festival, Film IndependentForum, Visual Communications, Center for Asian American Media, San Diego Asian Film Festival, Los Angeles Asian Film Festival, San Francisco Asian Film Festival, Indian Film Festival of Los Angeles, the International Documentary Association, Temple University Division of Film, The Documentary Summit at Columbia College of Film and others.

Micheline MaynardMicheline Maynard is an author, journalist and professor. She has been a correspondent and bureau chief for the New York Times, where she is a contributor, and senior editor at the NPR news magazine Here & Now. She writes for Forbes.com, Medium, Skift, ABC Australia, and teaches at the University of Michigan. Her six books include The End of Detroit, which predicted the bankruptcies at the Detroit companies and the rise of Japanese auto companies, and she is at work on her next books.

Nancy RobinsonNancy Robinson is Director, Education Programs for the Television Academy Foundation. In this capacity, she oversees the Foundation’s highly rated summer Student Internship Program, the annual Faculty Seminar, the Mister Rogers Memorial Scholarship Program, the Visiting Professionals speaker program, and Alumni engagement. Nancy is also responsible for educational outreach and creating alliances with colleges/universities nationwide. Prior to joining the Foundation’s Education department in 1999, Nancy was Convention Services Manager for a large trade association, planning and executing their annual convention and numerous small meetings across the country. She was also an Awards Consultant with a firm specializing in managing submissions for such companies as the Disney Channel, HBO, and FOX. She began her career as the Primetime and Daytime Emmy Awards assistant for the Television Academy. Nancy is a graduate of the University of California, San Diego with a Bachelor’s degree in Visual Arts/Media Production and a minor in Sociology.

Mary SchafferMary C. Schaffer is a digital media consultant.  She was an Associate Professor of New Media at California State University, Northridge (CSUN) for 14 years.  Prior to CSUN, she spent 12 years as a New Media Executive (Disney, Viacom, Geocities) and 18 years as a journalist (NPR, CBS and NBC).  She is a member of the Producers Guild of America, the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences, the International Documentary Association and Broadcast Education Association.

Richard TrankRichard Trank is an Academy Award-winning documentary filmmaker (producer, writer, and director), known for The Long Way Home (1997), Beautiful Music (2005), I Have Never Forgotten You: The Life & Legacy of Simon Wiesenthal (2007), Against the Tide (2009), Winston Churchill: Walking with Destiny (2010), It is no Dream: The life of Theodore Herzl (2012); The Prime Ministers: The Pioneers (2013); and The Prime Ministers: Soldiers and Peacemakers (2015). His newest film is Never Stop Dreaming: The Life and Legacy of Shimon Peres, scheduled for release in late 2018.

CID Video Competition: Last Day to Submit!

CID Video CompetitionThe CID video competition is still open but only one day remains to the final deadline of May 31, 2018. Tell your friends, tell your students! To submit an entry, click here, but submit by May 31 midnight (US east coast time). WARNING: Please read the entry rules carefully! Several submissions have not met the requirements, and cannot be considered for a prize until they are revised. Make sure you submit a video file (not audio), that is between 30 seconds and 2 minutes (not 30 minutes!), with the last line “Intercultural dialogue looks like…” and upload it to the server provided (not to YouTube directly). 

CID is running its first ever video competition, open to students enrolled in any college or university during the 2017-2018 academic year.

CID Video Competition

To enter, participants must submit a video no longer than 2 minutes that highlights the importance of intercultural dialogue, responding to the question: “What does intercultural dialogue look like?”

One winner will receive a $200 prize. The top entries will be posted to the CID YouTube channel, and be highlighted on the CID website, along with posts describing the creators and highlighting each of their videos, throughout the rest of 2018. Submissions will be evaluated based on originality, clarity, cultural message, effective use of technology, and overall impact. Feel free to work independently or in groups. Get creative, show off your skills and, most importantly, have fun!

Video Competition FAQ

Competition Rules

Continue reading “CID Video Competition: Last Day to Submit!”

CID Video Competition: Only 1 Week to Submit!

CID Video CompetitionThe CID video competition is still open but only one week remains to the final deadline of May 31, 2018. Tell your friends, tell your students! To submit an entry, click here. WARNING: Please read the entry rules carefully! Several submissions have not met the requirements, and cannot be considered for a prize until they are revised. Make sure you submit a video file (not audio), that is between 30 seconds and 2 minutes (not 30 minutes!), with the last line “Intercultural dialogue looks like…”, and upload it to the server provided, not to YouTube directly. 

CID is running its first ever video competition, open to students enrolled in any college or university during the 2017-2018 academic year.

CID Video Competition

To enter, participants must submit a video no longer than 2 minutes that highlights the importance of intercultural dialogue, responding to the question: “What does intercultural dialogue look like?”

One winner will receive a $200 prize. The top entries will be posted to the CID YouTube channel, and be highlighted on the CID website, along with posts describing the creators and highlighting each of their videos, throughout the rest of 2018. Submissions will be evaluated based on originality, clarity, cultural message, effective use of technology, and overall impact. Feel free to work independently or in groups. Get creative, show off your skills and, most importantly, have fun!

Video Competition FAQ

Competition Rules

Continue reading “CID Video Competition: Only 1 Week to Submit!”

CID Video Competition: Only 2 Weeks to Submit!

CID Video CompetitionThe CID video competition is open. The first set of entries have already been submitted and the first judges have agreed to serve. Two weeks remain to the final deadline of May 31, 2018. To submit an entry, click here.

CID is running its first ever video competition, open to students enrolled in any college or university during the 2017-2018 academic year.

CID Video Competition

To enter, participants must submit a video no longer than 2 minutes that highlights the importance of intercultural dialogue, responding to the question: “What does intercultural dialogue look like?”

One winner will receive a $200 prize. The top entries will be posted to the CID YouTube channel, and be highlighted on the CID website, along with posts describing the creators and highlighting each of their videos, throughout the rest of 2018. Submissions will be evaluated based on originality, clarity, cultural message, effective use of technology, and overall impact. Feel free to work independently or in groups. Get creative, show off your skills and, most importantly, have fun!

Video Competition FAQ

Competition Rules

Continue reading “CID Video Competition: Only 2 Weeks to Submit!”

CID Video Competition: Only 3 Weeks to Submit!

CID Video CompetitionThe CID video competition is open, and the first set of entries have already been submitted. Three weeks remain to the final deadline of May 31, 2018. To submit an entry, click here.

CID is running its first ever video competition, open to students enrolled in any college or university during the 2017-2018 academic year.

CID Video Competition

To enter, participants must submit a video no longer than 2 minutes that highlights the importance of intercultural dialogue, responding to the question: “What does intercultural dialogue look like?”

One winner will receive a $200 prize. The top entries will be posted to the CID YouTube channel, and be highlighted on the CID website, along with posts describing the creators and highlighting each of their videos, throughout the rest of 2018. Submissions will be evaluated based on originality, clarity, cultural message, effective use of technology, and overall impact. Feel free to work independently or in groups. Get creative, show off your skills and, most importantly, have fun!

Video Competition FAQ

Competition Rules

Continue reading “CID Video Competition: Only 3 Weeks to Submit!”

CID Video Competition Now OPEN

CID Video CompetitionThis video competition now is open to all students, undergraduate or graduate, anywhere in the world. Final deadline: May 31, 2018. To submit an entry, click here.

CID has organized its first ever video competition, open to students enrolled in any college or university during the 2017-2018 academic year.

CID Video Competition

To enter, participants must submit a video no longer than 2 minutes that highlights the importance of intercultural dialogue, responding to the question: “What does intercultural dialogue look like?”

Entries will be accepted April 15-May 31, 2018.

One winner will receive a $200 prize. The top entries will be posted to the CID YouTube channel, and be highlighted on the CID website, along with posts describing the creators and highlighting each of their videos, throughout the rest of 2018.

Submissions will be evaluated based on originality, clarity, cultural message, effective use of technology, and overall impact. Feel free to work independently or in groups. Get creative, show off your skills and, most importantly, have fun!

Video Competition FAQ

Competition Rules

Continue reading “CID Video Competition Now OPEN”

CID Video Competition – FAQ

CID Video CompetitionAs people are learning of the CID Video Competition, they have been asking questions. In hopes this will help others, the questions will be posted, along with answers. As further questions are asked, they will be answered here.

WARNING: Please read the entry rules carefully! Several submissions have not met the requirements, and cannot be considered for a prize until they are revised. Make sure you submit a video file (not audio), that is between 30 seconds and 2 minutes (not 30 minutes!), with the last line “Intercultural dialogue looks like…” and upload it to the server provided (not to YouTube directly). 

NEW Clarification: When someone asks “Intercultural dialogue looks like…” in English, the “…” (read out loud as dot-dot-dot) means your job is to complete the sentence and include your answer as the last shot in the video. (So, “intercultural dialogue looks like a tiger, an ice cream cone, a braid, etc.” – choose whatever image makes sense given your video.) Please do NOT include the literal phrase “Intercultural dialogue looks like…” as the last shot in your video!


Question: Where do I submit an entry?

Answer: To submit an entry, click here.


Question: Does it matter how many people are in the video? Our idea is to film the entire class in action!

Answer: No limit to how many people are included. Do whatever works for you.


Question: How do students submit their videos? I couldn’t find a URL in the description of the competition.

Answer: The URL will be posted on April 15, 2018, the first day submissions will be accepted.


Question: Is this an international competition?

Answer: Most definitely! Students from every country are encouraged to participate. We hope for good international coverage.


Question: Is the video competition open to graduate students?

Answer: Absolutely! Students at any level of higher education, from community or technical college to undergraduates, masters or doctoral studies, are all eligible.


Question: Is the video competition open to faculty working jointly with their students?

Answer: While faculty may advise students, they may not be co-creators. The intent is to encourage students to create the videos.


Question: Is there a language requirement for the videos?

Answer: The videos will have to be in English. Permitting any other language would imply having judges who know all the several dozen languages currently represented on the site, which would be impossible. However, creating a video in another language with English subtitles should be fine. Choosing to have most of the video acted out, with minimal linguistic elements, should work as well.