Academy Robert Bosch Fellowship (Russia and Eurasia)

Academy Robert Bosch Fellowship

Chatham House, in partnership with the Robert Bosch Stiftung, hosts fellows from the six countries of the Eastern Partnership and Russia.

The fellowship offers an opportunity for the next generation of scholars from Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova, Russia and Ukraine to advance their knowledge of post-Soviet politics, develop research skills, contribute to Chatham House research, and build links with policy and academic communities in the UK, Germany and the EU more broadly. The fellowship is aimed at future leaders, researchers and opinion-makers in the early stages of their careers.

The fellows spend nine months working at Chatham House with the Russia and Eurasia Programme team. During this time they will conduct a research project of their own design relating to the politics, economies and/or societies of the post-Soviet region. In the course of the fellowship, the scholars will conduct research trips to the region and also spend time at the German Council on Foreign Relations in Berlin. The fellowships are part of Chatham House’s Queen Elizabeth II Academy for Leadership in International Affairs.

Call for applications 2016/17
The 2016/17 application window is now open and will close on 31 May 2016.

To apply, please refer to the information pack and application form as well as our FAQ page. The application form and accompanying documents should be completed and emailed to AcademyRobertBoschFellowships@chathamhouse.org by 17:00 BST 31 May 2016.

Interviews are scheduled to take place in London on 15 July 2016.

Research topics
Research projects should be designed by you. However, you should bear in mind what would also be relevant to an international policy institute. Your project should therefore fall into one or more of the following broad categories:

Internal Dynamics
1. Prospects for Economic Growth, Modernization and Democratization in the Eastern Partnership Countries and/or Russia
2. Regional Elites and Networks of Power
3. Societal Changes, Inter-ethnic Relations and Non-state actors

External Attitudes
4. The Future of EU and NATO Relations with the Eastern Partnership Countries and/or Russia
5. Security and Conflict Resolution
6. Prospects for Intra-regional Conflict or Cooperation
7. Russia and the Shared Neighbourhood with Europe

Contact
Should you have any further queries please email the Academy.

Fulbright Award Opportunities in Communication

The Fulbright Scholar competition for academic year 2016-2017 is now open. Specific opportunities in Communication are available this year in Ghana, Finland, Swaziland, Bulgaria, and Ukraine, but there are another 400 opportunities for which Communication scholars can potentially compete, since many leave the specialization open. The current competition will close on August 3, 2015. A description of the activities of some of those who have completed Fulbrights in Communication has previously been posted to this site. (If you have completed a Fulbright in Communication and would like to have your name and description added, contact CID.)

Olena Zelikovska Micro Grant Award

Olena ZelikovskaOlena Zelikovska has been awarded a micro grant for international travel, funded by the Association for Business Communication through the Center for Intercultural Dialogue. The following is her description of herself and the project. You can also read the main article describing all award winners.


Dr. Olena Zelikovska is an Associate Professor in the Department of English for Economic Specialties at the National University of Life and Environmental Sciences of Ukraine (NULESU). For the last 10 years she has been working as a focal point in developing curriculum of “Business English” and ‘Translation of Commercial Correspondence and Business Communication’ for undergraduate and graduate students majoring in Economics, Management of International Affairs and Linguistics as well as in supervising students’ research projects with the focus on intercultural communication issues.

In 2010, Zelikovska defended the thesis: ‘Developing intercultural competence in the students of higher economic educational institutions’ (adopted by the Ministry of Education and Science of Ukraine). She has been chairing the Student’s Research Group “Business Environment and Intercultural Communication” since 2011.

Zelikovska has been constantly seeking for international cooperation to provide the students with valuable practical experience. She is interested in project-based programs designed to connect American and Ukrainian students in a distance learning opportunity that is grounded in intercultural dialogue and exchange.

Project background: The growing importance of English as an instrument of international communication on the global scale and its increased use in Ukraine has triggered research about improved methods to develop university students’ intercultural competence (ICC). This has promoted changes in both the teaching and learning process. However lack of students’ cross-cultural communication experience has resulted in low sensitivity of intercultural issues. The initial discussion has shown that the NULESU students majoring in Management of International Affairs or in Linguistics have very little idea about intercultural communication (IC). For instance, they are unaware of the privacy zone character of the American culture and can easily use the patterns of direct language imposing their ideas and feelings on the interlocutor as they commonly do in Ukrainian culture with higher power distance and no privacy space. Moreover English classroom communicative behavior of the majority of faculty staff unfortunately does not often correlate with such behavior of their American colleagues. That is why the traditional teaching practice does not achieve the expected results on developing ICC.

The key to the solution may be the application of the 3-component intercultural development model that provides knowledge (cognitive element of the model), foster awareness (affective element of the model) and develop skills (behavioral element of the model). The proposed project seeks to assess the interrelated issues: How to fill each component of the model with the intercultural communication content tailored to the particular needs of the individual student? How do these components correlate with each other? What issues should be submitted for Student’s Research Group? How to launch distant projects between American and Ukrainian students to enrich each other with learning by experience? The development of classroom communicative behavior of the department staff is the issue of special importance. The project will provide the unique opportunity for the grant holder to study all these processes as a system at the Californian State University by classroom observation, students and faculty staff surveying and discussions with further analysis of the data collected. The ultimate goal of the research is to empower Ukrainian students with intercultural awareness enabling them to develop empathy, tolerance and mutual understanding with their American peers.