Lisa Hanasono Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesLisa Hanasono (Ph.D., Purdue University) is an associate professor in the School of Media and Communication at Bowling Green State University (BGSU). Her research investigates that dark and bright sides of relational and intercultural communication. Specifically, she examines how people communicate their prejudice in interpersonal, computer-mediated, organizational, and cultural contexts. She also studies how individuals, groups, institutions, and communities reduce discrimination through supportive communication, allyship, advocacy, community-building, and institutional change.

While pursuing her Ph.D. at Purdue University, she worked with a team of administrators, faculty, staff, and students to establish an Asian American Studies Program. At BGSU, she teaches undergraduate and graduate courses related to race and communication, persuasion, interpersonal communication, research methods, interviewing, and communication theory.  She has won several awards for her teaching, including the Central States Communication Association’s Outstanding New Teacher Award, The Elliott L. Blinn Award for Faculty-Undergraduate Research, BGSU Graduate Student Senate’s Outstanding Contributor to Graduate Education Award, and the David Hoch Memorial Award for Excellence in Service.

Dr. Hanasono is strongly committed to diversity, inclusion, and social justice. She serves on the President’s Advisory Committee on Diversity and Inclusion and the College of Arts and Sciences’ Council at BGSU, and she is working on BGSU’s IDEAL-N grant team which strives to promote gender equity and inclusive leadership in universities and colleges across the United States. In 2016, she won BGSU’s Diversity Award for designing and implementing a successful anti-hate community-based project. Currently, she leads the Faculty Development and Diversity Learning Community at BGSU and facilitates professional development workshops related to mentoring, teaching effectiveness, reducing social biases, and career advancement. She is the Chair of the National Communication Association’s (NCA) Asian/Pacific American Caucus and Asian/Pacific American Communication Studies Division, and she serves as the Publications Officer of NCA’s International and Intercultural Communication Studies Division.

Key Publications

Hanasono, L. K. (2013). Sticks and stones: Dealing with discrimination. In S. L. Faulkner (Ed.), Inside relationships: A creative case book on relational communication (pp. 225-231). Walnut Creek, CA: Left Coast Press.

Hanasono, L.  K., Burleson, B. R., Bodie, G. B., Holmstrom, A. J., Rack, J. J., McCullough, J. D., & Rosier, J. G. (2011). Explaining gender differences in the perception of support availability: The mediating effects of construct availability and accessibility. Communication Research Reports, 28, 254-265.doi: 10.1080/08824096.2011.588580

Hanasono, L. K., Chen, L., & Wilson, S. R. (2014). Identifying communities in need: Examining the impact of acculturation on perceived discrimination, social support, and coping amongst racial minority members. Journal of International and Intercultural Communication, 7, 216-237. doi: 10.1080/17513057.2014.929201

 Hanasono, L. K., & Yang, F. (2016). Computer-mediated coping: Exploring the quality of supportive communication in an online discussion forum for individuals who are coping with racial discrimination. Communication Quarterly, 64(4), 369-389.
doi: 10.1080/01463373.2015.1103292

Chen, L., & Hanasono L. K. (2016). The effect of acculturation on Chinese international students’ usage of Facebook and Renren. Chinese Media Research, 12, 46-59.

 

U Albany Job Ad: Organizational/Interpersonal/Intercultural

Job adsThe Department of Communication at the University at Albany is seeking to fill a tenure track position with a scholar whose research focuses on either organizational communication, or interpersonal and/or intercultural communication (in relational, health, or organizational contexts).

The Department welcomes applications from scholars of all methodological orientations. Senior scholars must possess an established record of productive, externally funded research and a record of excellence in teaching; junior scholars should demonstrate the potential for productive research and some evidence of teaching effectiveness. Candidates must be willing to contribute to the Department’s initiatives in online teaching and learning. Applicants should share a commitment to the University’s strategic values for engaged learning and societal responsibility, and to its goal for increasing levels of external funding.

Applicants must address in their applications their ability to work with and instruct a culturally diverse population. Additionally, the applicant must currently possess a doctoral degree or expect to receive a doctoral degree by August 1, 2018, from a university accredited by the U.S. Department of Education or an internationally recognized accrediting organization.

The appointment will begin in Fall 2018. Review of applications will begin October 7, 2017.

Li Li Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesLi Li (Ph.D., Ohio University) is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication and Journalism at University of Wyoming. Her areas of interest include various aspects of instructional communication and intercultural communication. Specifically, She is dedicated to contributing to the theoretical and empirical understanding of how teachers, especially diverse teachers, plan their communication to enhance various types of student learning in different settings.

Recent publications

Qian, Y., & Li, L. (2017). Student off-task electronic multitasking predictors: Scale development and validation. Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 17 (2), 53-73.

Chen, Y. W., Li, L., & Lou, S. (2016). “The superhero in our hearts is Chairman Mao”: The structurating of Chinese sojourners’ conceptualizations of (super)heroes identities. The Howard Journal of Communications, 27 (3), 218-235.

Jia, M., Li, L., & Titsworth, S. (2015). Teaching as emotional work: Instructor’s empathy and students’ motives to communicate out of class. The Electronic Journal of Communication, 25 (3-4).

Li, L., & Titsworth, S. (2015). Student misbehaviors in online classrooms: Scale development and validation. The American Journal of Distance Education, 29, 41-55.

Li, L., Chen, Y. W., & Nakazawa, M. (2013). Voices of Chinese Web-TV audiences: A case of applying Uses and Gratifications theory to examine popularity of Prison Break in China. China Media Research, 9, 63-74.

Li, L., Mazer, J., & Ju, R. (2011). Resolving international teaching assistant language inadequacy through dialogue: Challenges and opportunities for clarity and credibility. Communication Education, 60, 461-478.

Key Concept #5: Intercultural Communication Translated into Ukrainian

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#5: Intercultural communication, which I wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Roxanna M. Senyshyn has now translated into Ukrainian. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC5 Intercultural Communication_UkrainianLeeds-Hurwitz, W. (2017). Intercultural communication [Ukrainian]. (R. M. Senyshyn, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 5. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/08/kc5-intercultural-communication_ukrainian.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Roxanna Senyshyn Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesRoxanna Senyshyn is Assistant Professor of Applied Linguistics and Communication Arts and Sciences at Pennsylvania State University, Abington College. Her teaching and research focus on intercultural communication and second language learning and teaching. Specifically, her research interests include intercultural and transformative learning in teacher education, intercultural competencies for academic and professional purposes, and ESL pedagogy and assessment with a focus on academic writing.

Roxanna SenyshynOne strand of Dr. Senyshyn’s research examines the need to prepare both preservice and inservice teachers for working with English language learners in multilingual and multicultural classroom settings.  Through community-based scholarship, she investigates the impact of intercultural engagement and learning on different constituents. From the student perspective, she has studied the impact of intercultural learning through engagement of domestic students with their international peers in semester long projects. She has studied this influence through the lens of Mezirow’s transformative learning theory, which encourages critical reflection and examination of personal beliefs and actions to allow for a change in perspectives and behavior. She has also used transformative learning framework in a faculty professional development context as an assessment tool to investigate the impact of professional development on faculty practices surrounding teaching and learning in a linguistically and culturally diverse college classroom.

The other strand of Dr. Senyshyn’s research focuses on intercultural learning and intercultural competence development to aid in the process of adjustment and acculturation of international students. The primary focus for this scholarship has been on identifying challenges that international students experience when adjusting to both academic and social demands in U.S. colleges and universities and assessing academic support to aid these students in their successful transition. In one of her recent projects, she examined the impact of first-year seminar experience and out-of-class engagement with domestic students on international students’ intercultural competence development.

In addition to her experience in academia, Dr. Senyshyn has been a consultant for BGRS Intercultural and Language Training doing training and coaching for inbound and outbound expatriates and their families in the greater Philadelphia area (Pennsylvania, U.S.).

Chamberlin-Quinlisk, C. R. & Senyshyn, R. (2012). Language teaching and intercultural education: Making critical connections. Intercultural Education, 23, 15-23.

Senyshyn, R.M. & Chamberlin-Quinlisk, C.R. (2009).  Assessing effective partnerships in intercultural education: Transformative learning as a tool for evaluation. Communication Teacher, 23 (4), 167-178.

Senyshyn, R.M.  (2001).  Learning cross-cultural competencies: Implications for international management education.  Perspectives in Higher Education Reform.  Proceedings of the 11th Annual International Conference of Alliance of Universities for Democracy, Volume 10, Sofia, Bulgaria.

Senyshyn, R.M., Warford, M., & Zhan, J.  (2000).  Academic and non-academic issues of adjustment to American higher education.  Journal of International Education, 30(1) 17-35.

Key Concept #5: Intercultural Communication Translated into Russian

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#5: Intercultural Communication, which I wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Inga Milēviča has now translated into Russian. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC5 Intercultural Communication_Russian
Leeds-Hurwitz, W. (2017). Intercultural communication [Russian]. (Inga Milēviča Trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 5. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/07/kc5-icc_russian.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

CID Poster #4: Types of Cultural Communication

CID PostersThis is the next of the posters designed by Linda J. de Wit, in her role as CID intern. The need for clarification between intercultural/ intracultural/ cross-cultural/ international forms of communication has been made obvious by the number of times I’ve been asked to explain the differences. These terms have been discussed at length in many publications; one direct source is:

Leeds-Hurwitz, W. (1990). Culture and communication: A review essay. Quarterly Journal of Speech, 76, 85-96.

The idea to use fruit for the visual explanation of the different terms was Linda’s, and came from proverbs: in English, one is told not to compare apples and oranges; in many other languages, the fruits referred to are apples and pears. The poster thus implicitly refers to the relativist idea that cultures shouldn’t be judged in comparison to others.

Types of Cultural Communication
Just in case anyone wants to cite this poster, the following would be the recommended format:

Center for Intercultural Dialogue. (2017). Types of cultural communication. CID Posters, 4. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/07/fruit.png

As with other series, if you wish to contribute an original contribution, please send an email before starting any work to receive approval, to minimize inadvertent duplication, and to learn about technical requirements. As is the case with other CID Publications, posters should be created initially in English. Given that translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue have received so many views, anyone who wishes to translate their own poster into another language (or two) is invited to provide that as well. If you want to volunteer to translate someone else’s poster into a language in which you are fluent, send in a note before starting, to receive approval and to confirm no one else is working on the same one.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concept #5: Intercultural Communication Translated into Simplified Chinese

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#5: Intercultural Communication, which I first published in English in 2014, and which Yan Qiu has now translated into Simplified Chinese. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC5 ICC_Chinese-simLeeds-Hurwitz, W. (2017). Intercultural communication [Simplified Chinese]. (Y. Qiu, Trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 5. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/07/kc5-icc_chinese-sim.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

CID Poster #1: Intercultural Communication/Competence/Dialogue

CID PostersThis is the first of the posters designed by Linda J. de Wit, in her role as CID intern. This one provides a quick and easy way to understand, and differentiate between, the concepts of “intercultural communication,” “intercultural competence,” and “intercultural dialogue,” using a rooster and a sheep to represent members of different cultures (and she notes that the animals are vector designs by vecteezy.com). The article where these explanations of these concepts (as well as lots of other concepts) were published is:

Leeds-Hurwitz, W. (2016). De la possession des compétences interculturelles au dialogue interculturel: Un cadre conceptuel [Moving from having intercultural competencies to constructing intercultural dialogues: A conceptual framework]. Les Politiques Sociales, 3/4, 7-22.

Intercultural communication/competence/dialogue

Just in case anyone wants to cite this poster, the following would be the recommended format:

Center for Intercultural Dialogue. (2017). Intercultural communication, intercultural competence, intercultural dialogue. CID Posters, 1. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.org/2017/06/28/cid-poster-1/

Now that the first poster is available as a model, the series is open to submissions. If you wish to contribute an original design, please send an email before starting any work to receive approval, to minimize inadvertent duplication, and to learn about technical requirements. As is the case with other CID Publications, posters should be created initially in English. Given that translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue have received so many views, where specific quotes are provided, anyone who wishes to translate their own poster into another language (or two) is invited to design that as well. If you want to volunteer to translate someone else’s poster into a language in which you are fluent, send in a note before starting, to receive approval and to confirm no one else is working on the same one.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

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Lauren Mark Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesLauren Mark is a doctoral student and Graduate Teaching Associate at the Hugh Downs School of Human Communication at Arizona State University. She is a certified Civil Dialogue Facilitator and holds an M.Ed in Educational Organization, Leadership and Policy, an M.A. in Dance, and a B.A. in English Literature and French. Prior to joining Hugh Downs, Lauren worked as a co-founder and project manager of two cross-cultural learning organizations in Taipei, Taiwan – Becoming, 緣創an intercultural development platform, and the East West Culture Project. Lauren has also worked as a translator and interpreter in Taiwan and Israel across a variety of business and artistic sectors.

Lauren MarkRooted in her experiences in the field, Lauren’s general research interests focus on identity shifts in acculturation. Her studies focus on the intersection of ethnic, linguistic and performative factors in acculturation, as well as how local cultures influence people’s ways of being.

Pedagogically, Lauren explores innovative means to bring embodied self-reflexivity to classroom contexts, within courses such as Communication and Creativity and Gender and Communication. Her work in this arena began with her thesis work, Visible Histories, in which she explored how the sharing of embodied reminiscence and the collective physical reconstruction of memories served as a meeting ground for multiple generations exploring the art of dance. Lauren continues to experiment with ways that purposeful nonverbal communication can enhance reflexivity and active listening. This is an extension of her previous work in Taiwan, where she managed creative interdisciplinary labs and choreographed works that tested the boundaries between audience and performers.

Publication

Brezis, R. S., Singhal, N., Daley, T., Barua, M., Piggot, J., Chollera, S., Mark, L., & Weisner, T. (2016). Self- and other-descriptions by individuals with autism spectrum disorder in Los Angeles and New Delhi: Bridging cross-cultural psychology and neurodiversity. Culture and Brain, 4(2), 113-133.

Competitively Selected Presentations

Mark, L. (July, 2017). The construction of narrative schema in acculturation and third culture building. Paper presented at Benedictine University at Mesa’s conference, “Identity Negotiations,” Mesa, AZ.

Mark, L. (May, 2017). Visible histories. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, San Diego, CA.

Kim, Y., Shin, Y., Mark, L., & Lu, Y. (November, 2016). CTI and Social media: Investigating multi-layered identities on the Facebook. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Communication Association, Philadelphia, PA.

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