KC5 Intercultural Communication Translated into Greek

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#5: Intercultural Communication, which I published in English in 2014, and which Evelyn Vovou has now translated into Greek. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC5 Intercultural Communication_GreekLeeds-Hurwitz, W. (2017). Intercultural communication [Greek]. (E. Vovou, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 5. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/kc5-intercultural-communication_greek.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Will Baker Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesWill Baker is an Associate Professor in Applied Linguistics and the Deputy Director of the Centre for Global Englishes, Modern Languages and Linguistics, University of Southampton, UK. His research focuses on Global Englishes and intercultural communication and he is particularly interested in the interface between English as a lingua franca and intercultural communication research. His wider research interests include the practical implications of Global English and intercultural communication research for English language teaching and higher education, especially  English medium instruction. He has published and presented internationally in all these research areas. He also supervises doctoral students in these fields as well as convening MA programmes and courses in Global Englishes and Intercultural Communication.

Will Baker

He is the author of Culture and Identity through English as a Lingua Franca (DeGruyter Mouton), co-editor of the Routledge Handbook of English as a Lingua Franca and co-editor of the book series Developments in English as a Lingua Franca (DeGruyter Mouton). Recent research projects include the British Council ELT Research Partnership Award “From English language learners to Intercultural Citizens: Chinese student sojourners development of intercultural citizenship in ELT and EMI programmes” and Newton Fund Researcher Links Workshop Grant “ English as an ASEAN lingua franca: Implications for language education policy and practice”.

For further information please see his profile:
https://www.southampton.ac.uk/ml/about/staff/wmlb.page

Weber State U Job: Global/Intercultural Communication (Utah)

Job adsThe Department of Communication at Weber State University in Ogden, Utah, invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor of Global/Intercultural Communication and General Education who will begin Fall Semester 2018.

We seek a strong teacher and scholar with a critical and practical understanding of global/intercultural communication and the ability to teach our general education courses of Mass Media and Society, Public Speaking and/or Interpersonal and Small Group Communication. The successful candidate should expect to teach theoretical and applied courses at all levels of the undergraduate and master’s curricula in areas such as intercultural communication, communication theory, gender and communication, and interpersonal and conflict management. Our department is growing and updating curriculum so there may be the potential for expanding our offerings of intercultural/global communication courses and developing a Study Abroad program. International experience is a plus for consideration.

 

 

Review of applications will begin December 1, 2017, and will continue until the position is filled.

Study Abroad: London & Iceland 2018 (Radford U)

Study AbroadStudy Abroad in London and Iceland for Communication students (undergraduate or graduate) interested in studying Media and Society or Intercultural and International Communication in London and Iceland during summer 2018.  This is a three-week program (Approximately May 14 through June 6) where students experience the cultures first hand through visits to television and movie studios, live performances, guest lectures from professionals, and guided tours of museums, and historical venues.

The program is sponsored by Radford University and taught by Matthew Turner, Associate Professor of Communication.  The application deadline is October 31.

U Maryland Baltimore County Job: Intercultural Communication

Job adsTenure-Track Assistant/Associate Professor of Intercultural Communication, University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Application deadline: October 31, 2017.

The Department of Modern Languages, Linguistics, and Intercultural Communication at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) is filling a tenure-track position at the rank of Assistant or Associate Professor in intercultural communication. Candidates will be expected to have a comprehensive research agenda in intercultural communication. They should have in hand a PhD in intercultural communication or a closely related field, experience in intercultural training, and native or near-native proficiency in at least one of the following languages: Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Russian or Spanish. The department has been a pioneer in incorporating intercultural communication into its language pedagogy, enriching both the fields of language pedagogy and intercultural communication. Teaching responsibilities will include courses in intercultural training, other areas of critical intercultural communication, and courses in the selected candidate’s language area at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The candidate will also participate in the supervision of theses and scholarly papers in the department’s interdisciplinary MA program in Intercultural Communication. We welcome applications from applied linguistics, intercultural education, cross-cultural psychology, critical intercultural communication, and other fields that engage with intercultural modern language studies. Employment is contingent upon the candidate’s obtaining and maintaining appropriate visa status, if applicable. For more information about the MLLI department and the INCC program, please consult
http://mlli.umbc.edu.

UMBC has a strong commitment to increasing faculty diversity. We are especially proud of the diversity of our student body and we seek to attract equally diverse faculty. Successful candidates must be able to work in a multicultural environment and support diversity and inclusion reflecting our student body. Furthermore, the successful candidate should embrace our vision and mission, and be committed to inclusive excellence and diversity. Please include in your application letter a statement addressing your commitment to and experience in fostering inclusive excellence. Members of minority groups, women, veterans and individuals with disabilities are strongly encouraged to apply.

In your letter of application, please address your vision for the history, theories, debates, and methodologies of the field as they apply to your agenda for research, teaching, training, service, and outreach.”

Lisa Hanasono Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesLisa Hanasono (Ph.D., Purdue University) is an associate professor in the School of Media and Communication at Bowling Green State University (BGSU). Her research investigates that dark and bright sides of relational and intercultural communication. Specifically, she examines how people communicate their prejudice in interpersonal, computer-mediated, organizational, and cultural contexts. She also studies how individuals, groups, institutions, and communities reduce discrimination through supportive communication, allyship, advocacy, community-building, and institutional change.

While pursuing her Ph.D. at Purdue University, she worked with a team of administrators, faculty, staff, and students to establish an Asian American Studies Program. At BGSU, she teaches undergraduate and graduate courses related to race and communication, persuasion, interpersonal communication, research methods, interviewing, and communication theory.  She has won several awards for her teaching, including the Central States Communication Association’s Outstanding New Teacher Award, The Elliott L. Blinn Award for Faculty-Undergraduate Research, BGSU Graduate Student Senate’s Outstanding Contributor to Graduate Education Award, and the David Hoch Memorial Award for Excellence in Service.

Dr. Hanasono is strongly committed to diversity, inclusion, and social justice. She serves on the President’s Advisory Committee on Diversity and Inclusion and the College of Arts and Sciences’ Council at BGSU, and she is working on BGSU’s IDEAL-N grant team which strives to promote gender equity and inclusive leadership in universities and colleges across the United States. In 2016, she won BGSU’s Diversity Award for designing and implementing a successful anti-hate community-based project. Currently, she leads the Faculty Development and Diversity Learning Community at BGSU and facilitates professional development workshops related to mentoring, teaching effectiveness, reducing social biases, and career advancement. She is the Chair of the National Communication Association’s (NCA) Asian/Pacific American Caucus and Asian/Pacific American Communication Studies Division, and she serves as the Publications Officer of NCA’s International and Intercultural Communication Studies Division.

Key Publications

Hanasono, L. K. (2013). Sticks and stones: Dealing with discrimination. In S. L. Faulkner (Ed.), Inside relationships: A creative case book on relational communication (pp. 225-231). Walnut Creek, CA: Left Coast Press.

Hanasono, L.  K., Burleson, B. R., Bodie, G. B., Holmstrom, A. J., Rack, J. J., McCullough, J. D., & Rosier, J. G. (2011). Explaining gender differences in the perception of support availability: The mediating effects of construct availability and accessibility. Communication Research Reports, 28, 254-265.doi: 10.1080/08824096.2011.588580

Hanasono, L. K., Chen, L., & Wilson, S. R. (2014). Identifying communities in need: Examining the impact of acculturation on perceived discrimination, social support, and coping amongst racial minority members. Journal of International and Intercultural Communication, 7, 216-237. doi: 10.1080/17513057.2014.929201

 Hanasono, L. K., & Yang, F. (2016). Computer-mediated coping: Exploring the quality of supportive communication in an online discussion forum for individuals who are coping with racial discrimination. Communication Quarterly, 64(4), 369-389.
doi: 10.1080/01463373.2015.1103292

Chen, L., & Hanasono L. K. (2016). The effect of acculturation on Chinese international students’ usage of Facebook and Renren. Chinese Media Research, 12, 46-59.

 

U Albany Job Ad: Organizational/Interpersonal/Intercultural

Job adsThe Department of Communication at the University at Albany is seeking to fill a tenure track position with a scholar whose research focuses on either organizational communication, or interpersonal and/or intercultural communication (in relational, health, or organizational contexts).

The Department welcomes applications from scholars of all methodological orientations. Senior scholars must possess an established record of productive, externally funded research and a record of excellence in teaching; junior scholars should demonstrate the potential for productive research and some evidence of teaching effectiveness. Candidates must be willing to contribute to the Department’s initiatives in online teaching and learning. Applicants should share a commitment to the University’s strategic values for engaged learning and societal responsibility, and to its goal for increasing levels of external funding.

Applicants must address in their applications their ability to work with and instruct a culturally diverse population. Additionally, the applicant must currently possess a doctoral degree or expect to receive a doctoral degree by August 1, 2018, from a university accredited by the U.S. Department of Education or an internationally recognized accrediting organization.

The appointment will begin in Fall 2018. Review of applications will begin October 7, 2017.

Li Li Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesLi Li (Ph.D., Ohio University) is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication and Journalism at University of Wyoming. Her areas of interest include various aspects of instructional communication and intercultural communication. Specifically, She is dedicated to contributing to the theoretical and empirical understanding of how teachers, especially diverse teachers, plan their communication to enhance various types of student learning in different settings.

Recent publications

Qian, Y., & Li, L. (2017). Student off-task electronic multitasking predictors: Scale development and validation. Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 17 (2), 53-73.

Chen, Y. W., Li, L., & Lou, S. (2016). “The superhero in our hearts is Chairman Mao”: The structurating of Chinese sojourners’ conceptualizations of (super)heroes identities. The Howard Journal of Communications, 27 (3), 218-235.

Jia, M., Li, L., & Titsworth, S. (2015). Teaching as emotional work: Instructor’s empathy and students’ motives to communicate out of class. The Electronic Journal of Communication, 25 (3-4).

Li, L., & Titsworth, S. (2015). Student misbehaviors in online classrooms: Scale development and validation. The American Journal of Distance Education, 29, 41-55.

Li, L., Chen, Y. W., & Nakazawa, M. (2013). Voices of Chinese Web-TV audiences: A case of applying Uses and Gratifications theory to examine popularity of Prison Break in China. China Media Research, 9, 63-74.

Li, L., Mazer, J., & Ju, R. (2011). Resolving international teaching assistant language inadequacy through dialogue: Challenges and opportunities for clarity and credibility. Communication Education, 60, 461-478.

Key Concept #5: Intercultural Communication Translated into Ukrainian

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#5: Intercultural communication, which I wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Roxanna M. Senyshyn has now translated into Ukrainian. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC5 Intercultural Communication_UkrainianLeeds-Hurwitz, W. (2017). Intercultural communication [Ukrainian]. (R. M. Senyshyn, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 5. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/08/kc5-intercultural-communication_ukrainian.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Roxanna Senyshyn Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesRoxanna Senyshyn is Assistant Professor of Applied Linguistics and Communication Arts and Sciences at Pennsylvania State University, Abington College. Her teaching and research focus on intercultural communication and second language learning and teaching. Specifically, her research interests include intercultural and transformative learning in teacher education, intercultural competencies for academic and professional purposes, and ESL pedagogy and assessment with a focus on academic writing.

Roxanna SenyshynOne strand of Dr. Senyshyn’s research examines the need to prepare both preservice and inservice teachers for working with English language learners in multilingual and multicultural classroom settings.  Through community-based scholarship, she investigates the impact of intercultural engagement and learning on different constituents. From the student perspective, she has studied the impact of intercultural learning through engagement of domestic students with their international peers in semester long projects. She has studied this influence through the lens of Mezirow’s transformative learning theory, which encourages critical reflection and examination of personal beliefs and actions to allow for a change in perspectives and behavior. She has also used transformative learning framework in a faculty professional development context as an assessment tool to investigate the impact of professional development on faculty practices surrounding teaching and learning in a linguistically and culturally diverse college classroom.

The other strand of Dr. Senyshyn’s research focuses on intercultural learning and intercultural competence development to aid in the process of adjustment and acculturation of international students. The primary focus for this scholarship has been on identifying challenges that international students experience when adjusting to both academic and social demands in U.S. colleges and universities and assessing academic support to aid these students in their successful transition. In one of her recent projects, she examined the impact of first-year seminar experience and out-of-class engagement with domestic students on international students’ intercultural competence development.

In addition to her experience in academia, Dr. Senyshyn has been a consultant for BGRS Intercultural and Language Training doing training and coaching for inbound and outbound expatriates and their families in the greater Philadelphia area (Pennsylvania, U.S.).

Chamberlin-Quinlisk, C. R. & Senyshyn, R. (2012). Language teaching and intercultural education: Making critical connections. Intercultural Education, 23, 15-23.

Senyshyn, R.M. & Chamberlin-Quinlisk, C.R. (2009).  Assessing effective partnerships in intercultural education: Transformative learning as a tool for evaluation. Communication Teacher, 23 (4), 167-178.

Senyshyn, R.M.  (2001).  Learning cross-cultural competencies: Implications for international management education.  Perspectives in Higher Education Reform.  Proceedings of the 11th Annual International Conference of Alliance of Universities for Democracy, Volume 10, Sofia, Bulgaria.

Senyshyn, R.M., Warford, M., & Zhan, J.  (2000).  Academic and non-academic issues of adjustment to American higher education.  Journal of International Education, 30(1) 17-35.