Key Concept #78: Language and Intercultural Communication by Jane Jackson

Key Concepts in ICDThe next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. Lists organized chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC78 Lg & ICCJackson, J. (2016). Language and intercultural communication. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 78. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.org/publications

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. Prior concepts are available on the main publications page. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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John Corbett researcher profile

John CorbettJohn Corbett (PhD, Glasgow University 1992) is Professor of English in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities at the University of Macau. He is currently Head of the Department of English.

His work on intercultural language education engages with the roles curriculum development and classroom tasks play in the development of intercultural communicative competence. He is increasingly interested in the interaction between intercultural language education and professionalism in domains such as medicine and tourism. He is the author of An Intercultural Approach to English Language Teaching (Multilingual Matters, 2003), Intercultural Language Activities (Cambridge University Press, 2010) and (with Peih-ying Lu) of English in Medicine: An Intercultural Approach to Teaching Language and Values (Multilingual Matters, 2012). He has authored and co-authored numerous book chapters, including (with Wendy Anderson and Alison Phipps) discussions of intercultural language learning in virtual communities. He was editor of the indexed journal Language and Intercultural Communication between 2004-9. While he works in Asia, he also has strong links with Brazil, and, with Andrea Assenti del Rio, he manages a BrazTESOL Special Interest Group on Intercultural Language Education on Facebook.

Go to his website for further details.

CFP IALIC 2013

Call for Papers: 12th Annual Conference of the International Association for Languages and Intercultural Communication
Language and Intercultural Communication in the Workplace: Critical Approaches to Theory and Practice
29 November – 1 December 2013
Lam Woo International Conference Centre
Hong Kong Baptist University

Conference overview:
From language classrooms to outdoor markets, the workplace is fundamental to socialisation. The workplace is not only a site of employment where, for example, money is made and institutional roles are enacted through various forms of discourse; it is also a location where interactants engage in social actions and practices, from befriending or bullying a colleague to complimenting or gossiping about the boss. In other words, the workplace possesses cultural and linguistic norms and conventions for engaging in work and non-work related activities.

Recently, the workplace has begun to attract the attention of scholars because of advances in communication technology, cheaper and greater options for travel, and global migration and immigration. Work is no longer confined to a single space. It now requires people to travel over great geographical distances, communicate with cultural ‘others’ located in different time zones, relocate to different regions or countries, and conduct business in online settings. The workplace is thus changing and evolving, creating new and emerging communicative contexts. Intercultural communication researchers have a long tradition of investigating the language and communication of such activities.

The aim of the conference is to promote greater understanding of workplace cultures, particularly the ways in which working in highly interconnected and multicultural societies shape language and intercultural communication. The conference aims to encourage greater dialogue between researchers studying workplace issues with different theoretical and methodological frameworks, and between researchers and practitioners. Abstracts are welcome in any area related to the workplace, including pedagogical settings. The conference focuses on critical approaches to theory and practice, and we are particularly interested in studies that use practice to shape theory, and studies that question the validity and universality of existing models. Many Asian scholars, for example, have criticised some of the predominant models in intercultural communication for being Eurocentric/Anglocentric, and the conference welcomes papers proposing alternative frameworks for analysing intercultural communication in the workplace.

Please submit your abstract (250-300 words) with a short bio to ialic2013 AT hkbu.edu.hk
Deadline for submission of abstracts: 15 June 2013
Notification of acceptance: 15 July 2013

Hans Ladegaard (Hong Kong Baptist University)
Christopher Jenks (City University of Hong Kong)
Co-Conveners of IALIC2013

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