King’s College London Job Ad: Digital Humanities

Job adsResearch Associate in Digital Humanities, King’s College London, UK. Application Deadline: 15 January 2018.

A researcher is required on a new EU project investigating the use of participatory software platforms for community engagement and crowdsourcing around digital archives and data, with the aim of creating digital spaces for reflection and dialogue to support peace education and reconciliation in societies emerging from conflict. The software will be built on the Ushahidi platform, and there will be two pilots in east Africa (Rwanda and Kenya), following a ‘living labs’ methodology based on participatory design and evaluation.

The project will use data analytics to investigate how user communities interact with and respond to the platform, and to evaluate its impact. More broadly, the project aims to address the potential applications of data in a development context, and to build sustainable partnerships and capacity in digital content technologies with industry and university partners in the region. Candidates should have a broad understanding of information systems and technologies; an interest in the role of informatics in social development would be an advantage.

To apply for this role, please go to the King’s College London HireWire Job Board and register to download and submit the specified application form.

This post will be offered on a Fixed Term Contract for 33 months.

The deadline for applications is midnight on 15 January 2018.

King’s College London Post-graduate Studentships

FellowshipsA range of post-graduate studentships are available for 2018-19 entry at the Centre for Language Discourse & Communication at King’s College London, offering supervision in text, discourse, narrative & interaction analysis, pragmatics, linguistic ethnography, sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, applied, educational, cognitive and corpus linguistics:

To apply, you should have excellent qualifications, as well as clear research idea if you are applying for a three year PhD award.  It is important to identify and contact a potential supervisor as soon as possible, referring to faculty webpages, and you also need to submit an ordinary admissions application.

King’s College London: Postdoc Second Language Education (UK)

PostdocsPostdoctoral Fellow in Additional or Second Language EducationKing’s College London (UK)

The School of Education, Communication and Society is seeking to recruit an outstanding early career researcher who has recently completed their PhD, to contribute to research and teaching in additional/second language education, TESOL and applied linguistics. They will teach and supervise on the School’s MA programmes and contribute to the research and publications profile of the Centre for Language Discourse and Communication (LDC) as well as the wider School

This post will be full-time and fixed term from Jan 2nd to Dec 31st 2018 funded by an endowment (the Blackwells Endowment).

Applicants should have a proven research track record and a commitment to teaching in higher education.

The selection process will include a presentation and a panel interview.

Closing date: 08 October 2017

Short Course on Ethnography, Language & Communication (UK)

Key concepts and methods in ethnography, language & communication
11-15 September 2017, London

Is ‘qualitative data analysis’ too vague for you? Are you wondering how to do justice to your data?

If you are researching social processes, institutions, culture or identity, but are unsure about how to analyse the discourse data from your fieldwork, then consider joining this five day research training course.

The programme is designed to help PhD and post-doctoral researchers to navigate the twin perils of over- and under-interpreting discourse data. It introduces a range of key perspectives and tools used to study language and communication ethnographically and it facilitates the study of social practice in a wide range of different settings – education, workplace, recreation, health etc. Initiated with ESRC funding in 2007 and now based in the King’s ESRC Interdisciplinary Social Science Doctoral Training Centre, this will be our 9th ELC five-day course.

The course will be held at King’s College London from Monday to Friday, and it is taught by an international team from several leading research institutions: Prof Ben Rampton (Director), Dr Jeff Bezemer, Prof Jan Blommaert, Dr Adam Lefstein, Dr Julia Snell.

The deadline for applications is 1 May 2017. Spaces are limited, so candidates are advised to apply as soon as possible. Some funding will be available for bursaries.

King’s College London Job Ad: International Education (UK)

Lecturer in International Education
King’s College London – School of Education, Communication and Society
This post will be full-time and fixed term to September 2020.

The School of Education, Communication and Society is seeking to recruit an outstanding academic to contribute to research, teaching and programme administration in international education. The post-holder will make a significant contribution, in particular, to the MA in International Education, a new degree for teachers in international schools developed in association with Nord Anglia Education.

The successful candidate, who will be based in the Centre for Public Policy Research, will have a strong research track record, expertise in international education, with a very strong grounding in a foundation discipline, outstanding teaching ability, strong organisational and communication skills, and an interest in and aptitude for communication across disciplines and with education professionals.

The selection process will comprise a presentation and a panel interview.

To apply for this role, please go to the King’s College London HireWire Job Board and register to download and submit the specified application form.

The deadline for applications is midnight on 2 April 2017

Language, power, ethics and superdiversity (UK)

Language, power, ethics and superdiversity
Friday 13th May  2016,
10.30am – 5.15pm
Centre for Language, Discourse and Communication
King’s College London
Franklin-Wilkins Building Waterloo Bridge Wing Room G552

In an era characterised by increasingly dynamic population mobility, traditional presuppositions about the substance of individual and group identities, and about the social and political semiotics that shape them, seem inadequate. In superdiverse societies, the question of language poses a particularly difficult challenge, owing both to its identitarian and communicative dimensions. These new realities raise new questions, empirical and normative alike: in such circumstances, what constitutes a linguistic identity? How do linguistic identity and political agency interplay? Are all linguistic identities necessarily political, and, if so, are they of equal value? What forms of linguistic prioritisation, e.g. in civic life, education and the job market, may be considered legitimate? Are national governments justifiable in intervening in the linguistic repertoires, practices and identities of citizens and non-citizens? Are some notions of linguistic integration and citizenship more compatible with democratic principles than others? Could these notions be grounded in sufficiently common social and political semiotics? And what role is there for the state in a rapidly globalising world? These and similar questions unavoidably require principled interdisciplinary collaboration between linguists, philosophers, political scientists and public policy researchers.

Papers:
• Language ethics and the interdisciplinary challenge – Yael Peled, IHSP and Law, McGill University
• Pluricentric linguistic justice: a normative approach to the question of language ownership – Leigh Oakes, French and Linguistics, Queen Mary University of London
• The normative stakes of academic Anglicisation: language/power/knowledge/ethics – Daniel Weinstock, IHSP and Law, McGill University
• Language Revitalization and Social Transformation: Empirical and Normative Questions – Huw Lewis, International Politics, Aberystwyth

Attendance is free, though places are limited.  Book a place online.

 

Fellowships for Graduate Study at King’s College London

A range of post-graduate studentships (called graduate fellowships in US) are available for 2016-17 entry at the Centre for Language Discourse & Communication at King’s College London, offering supervision in text, discourse & narrative analysis, pragmatics, linguistic ethnography, sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, applied, educational, cognitive and corpus linguistics:
Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC) Studentships (deadline: 29 January 2016).  These cover sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, interactional discourse analysis, linguistic ethnography, areas of applied linguistics, computational linguistics, educational linguistics and language & literacy education.  Candidates can apply either for a three year PhD Studentship or for a four year Studentship which involves a one year MA and a three year PhD.
Arts & Humanities Research Council/London Arts & Humanities Partnership (AHRC/LAHP) Studentships (deadline: 29 January 2016).   This covers research on linguistic structure, history, theory and description, including stylistics, discourse analysis, pragmatics, corpus studies, translation, and some areas of applied linguistics.  Studentships last three years.
• Studentships administered by the King’s College Graduate School.

To apply, you should have excellent qualifications, as well as clear research idea if you are applying for a three year PhD award.  It is important to identify and contact a potential supervisor as soon as possible, referring to our webpages, and you also need to submit an ordinary admissions application.

Studentship-intercultural and health

The development of intercultural competence among medical students
King’s College London

First supervisor: Shuangyu Li
Second supervisor: Ben Rampton
Division: Medical Education
Type of programme: 4 years
Project code: MELiS

Project description: There is growing recognition of the need to develop intercultural competence among medical students, and this is reflected in the GMC’s Tomorrow’s Doctors 2009 and DoH’s the Race Equality Action 2004. But research suggests that intercultural training lacks coherence in UK medical schools, and the situation of international students is also a source of concern. Within this problem-space, this studentship addresses 3 questions at the interface of medical education and linguistic ethnography:

– what kinds of contribution to intercultural competence development derive from which settings, taking into account the full range of formal and informal contexts in which medical students participate?

– how far and in what ways are the intercultural learning needs of home and international students complementary or divergent?

– what are the implications for training?

Objectives for each year:
Year 1: a. review training frameworks and facilities available in UK medical schools; b. develop research skills c. design research tools year
Year 2: a. conduct ethnographic investigation with medical students at KCL
Year 3: a. analysis data; b. consider publications in journals and conferences
Year 4: write up and disseminate results.

The studentship will draw on training provided both by the Centre for Language Discourse & Communication and the College’s ESRC Doctoral Training Centre, and it will be affiliated to the DTC’s Education, Mind and Society Theme.