CFP NAMLE: Media Literacy & Social Justice (Online)

ConferencesCall for Proposals, National Association for Media Literacy Education (NAMLE): Media Literacy and Social Justice, Online,  July 16 – 18, 2021. Deadline: March 14, 2021.

CFP NAMLE 2021

Media literacy has many connections with social justice; in fact, many would say that media literacy is social justice. Specifically, media literacy helps us to understand the relationships between media, information, and power; this is often referred to as critical media literacy. The process of developing media literacy skills helps us to decipher what a piece of media wants you to believe and why, who benefits from you believing it, whose perspectives are valued in mainstream media, whose perspectives are marginalized or missing, and how we might elevate them. It helps us to unpack stereotypes and circulate ideas about various groups. Media literacy promotes inquiry into the effects that propaganda and mis/dis-information have on our politics and how they perpetuate injustices against marginalized groups, the environment, and our sociopolitical climate. In sum, media literacy helps us to understand issues of systemic inequity and who benefits from their maintenance, while also inspiring action, critical change, and the democratization of media industries. Given all of these connections, NAMLE finds it extremely salient to organize a conference around the topic of Media Literacy + Social Justice.

Proposals will be given special consideration if they (1) articulate concrete connections to social justice, and (2) offer a fresh point of view of an issue within the field of media literacy education.

KC68 Social Justice Translated into Spanish

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#68: Social Justice, which Kathryn Sorrells wrote for publication in English in 2015, and which  Jhon Eduardo Mosquera Pérez has now translated into Spanish.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized alphabetically by conceptchronologically by publication date and number, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC68 Social Justice_SpanishSorrells, K. (2021). Justicia social. (J. E. Mosquera Pérez, Trans.). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 68. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2021/02/kc68-social-justice_spanish.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Cornell U Press Offers Free Anti-Racism & Social Justice Books

Intercultural PedagogyAnti-racism and Social Justice Resources, available for free, from Cornell University Press, Ithaca, NY, USA.

In order to help inform dialogues and promote understanding about antiracism and racial justice, Cornell University Press is making available a collection of ebooks on topics related to anti-racism and social justice for free. The offer is good through August 31, 2020.

The list includes a wide range of topics, from Black Lives and Spatial Matters:
Policing Blackness and Practicing Freedom in Suburban St. Louis by Jodi Rios to In the Words of Frederick Douglass: Quotations from Liberty’s Champion by Frederick Douglass. There are a lot of lists of reading materials circulating online now, but this is a rare offer from a major publisher offer.

Another series of likely interest to CID followers is their Cornell Global Perspectives,  the Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies’ imprint with Cornell University Press. CGP titles examine urgent global challenges, typically from an interdisciplinary perspective, and are intended for an informed but non-specialist audience.

If you know of a similar offer from another publisher, please send a note to (intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com).

Cornell University Press was established in 1869 as the first American university press.

CFP Applied Linguistics & Social Justice

“PublicationCall For Abstracts: Applied Linguistics & Social Justice Special Issue of Applied Linguistics. Deadline: March 13, 2020.

The field of applied linguistics is concerned with “real world problems”. In order to truly engage with the real world it is essential to recognize systemic inequities and their relationships with language(s). This special issue will consider the range of interdisciplinary theoretical and methodological approaches that applied linguists have utilized in collaboration with academics, practitioners, and varied communities to address social (in)justices. Such work involves working collaboratively to ensure that social institutions are inclusive of everyone’s needs and wants, which means full and equal participation, equitable distribution of resources, access to opportunities, a recognition of the histories of oppression, and consciousness-raising for resistance.

Read the full call for abstracts here.

CU Denver: EnvironmentalComm/Social Justice (USA)

“JobAssistant Professor of Environmental Communication and Social Justice, Department of Communication, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO. Deadline: October 15, 2019 or until filled.

The Department of Communication at the University of Colorado Denver (CU Denver) invites applications for a full-time, tenure-track position in Environmental Communication and Social Justice at the Assistant Professor level. The position begins in August of 2020.

Tenure-track faculty members perform research and service consistent with peer research universities and teach on a 2/2 load.

The primary research and teaching focus of this position will fall within environmental communication and social justice. The successful candidate will show clear and sustained connections in research, teaching, and service to the Department’s mission: “to cultivate the knowledge and ability to use communication to create a more equitable and humane world.” This means we seek a colleague with expertise and experience in using environmental communication to work toward social justice, ideally in collaboration with community partners.

Preference will be given to candidates whose work in environmental communication and justice studies (climate, environmental and social) centrally addresses issues related to the Global South, indigenous communities, marginalized voices, and/or intersectional identities (including but not limited to class, gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, nationality, religion, and ability).

U Nevada Funded Social Justice MA

Graduate StudyUniversity of Nevada accepting applications for Social Justice Communication M.A.—Funded positions available. Deadline: February 15, 2018. NOTE: Deadline extended to March 30, 2018.

The Department of Communication Studies at the University of Nevada, Reno welcomes applicants for our M.A. program in Communication Studies.  Our program focuses on Social Justice.  The program offers students an opportunity to develop a theoretical foundation and a repertoire of skills associated with advocating for social justice across a number of contexts. Students may focus on interpersonal, organizational, intercultural, rhetorical, or performative areas and are able to include courses from other graduate areas of study. Graduates will find employment in related areas, such as public advocacy, public service, labor relations, human resources, dispute resolution services, and/or higher education, and the degree is helpful for management positions and application to related PhD programs. Threaded throughout the curriculum are the values inherent to the successful management of communication in practice, such as diversity, inclusion, tolerance, listening, ethics, understanding, assertiveness, and responsibility. In order to prepare students to create the socially just worlds they want to live and work in, the MA program in communication studies at the University of Nevada focuses on the process and socially constructed nature of communication as a means to create social meaning and change.

We are pleased to offer competitively funded TA positions. These positions come with a tuition waiver and a stipend.

The University of Nevada, Reno is the flagship campus of the Nevada System of Higher Education with a student population of approximately 21,000. We’re proud to be recognized as a National Tier 1 University. Nestled at the base of the Sierra Nevada, Reno is about 45 minutes from Lake Tahoe and 3 ½ hours from San Francisco.

Please email Dr. Sarah Blithe, Director of Graduate Studies for more information and application instructions.

KC68: Social Justice Translated into Arabic

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#68: Social Justice, which Kathryn Sorrells wrote for publication in English in 2015, and which Salma Tariq Shukri has now translated into Arabic.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC68 Social Justice_ArabicSorrells, K. (2018). Social justice [Arabic]. (S. T. Shukri, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 68. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2018/01/kc68-social-justice_arabic.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

CFP Our (Digital) Humanity

ConferencesOur (Digital) Humanity: Storytelling, Media Organizing, and Social Justice, 20-22 Apr. 2018, Lehigh University.  Deadline for CFP 15 Nov. 2017.

We are calling on scholars, media makers, public historians, artists, designers, technologists, and social justice activists to submit a session proposal for the Our (Digital) Humanity: Storytelling, Media Organizing and Social Justice conference in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania  April 20-22, 2018.

Submit your session online by filling out this form.  The deadline is November 15, 2017.

Sessions may be proposed under one of the conference’s six tracks.  A track is a series of sessions connected by a shared theme; in this case,

CID Poster #7: Social Justice/Social Harmony

CID PostersThis is the next of the posters designed by Linda J. de Wit, in her role as CID intern. This is the first poster to use one of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue as the source. The content here comes from KC79: Social Cohesion, written by Narine Nora Kerelian & Gizem Arat.

Social Justice/Social HarmonyJust in case anyone wants to cite this poster, the following would be the recommended format:

Center for Intercultural Dialogue. (2017). Social justice/social harmony. CID Posters, 7. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/08/social-justice-harmony.png

As with other series, CID Posters are available for free on the site; just click on the thumbnail to download a printable PDF. They may be downloaded, printed, and shared as is, without changes, without cost, so long as there is acknowledgment of the source.

As with other series, if you wish to contribute an original contribution, please send an email before starting any work to receive approval, to minimize inadvertent duplication, and to learn about technical requirements. As is the case with other CID Publications, posters should be created initially in English. Given that translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue have received so many views, anyone who wishes to translate their own poster into another language (or two) is invited to provide that as well. If you want to volunteer to translate someone else’s poster into a language in which you are fluent, send in a note before starting, to receive approval and to confirm no one else is working on the same one.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

CFP Who Belongs? Immigrants, Refugees, Migrants

Publication OpportunitiesCall for Papers: Journal of Critical Thought and Praxis (Special Issue): Who Belongs? Immigrants, Refugees, Migrants, and Actions Towards Justice

Over the past year, both in the U.S. and Europe, far-right nationalist and white supremacist organizations have led a massive assault on the human rights of immigrants, refugees, and migrants, resulting in multiple acts of violence against individuals and communities and a general climate of fear. Notably, this assault has been supported by the most mainstream of political actors, ranging from elected officials in the U.S. who advocate for travel bans targeted at people who are Muslim and deportation raids targeted at the Latinx community to the racist and xenophobic political platforms of leading candidates for the highest of political offices in France and Austria. In this issue, we seek to engage this political landscape by asking the question: Who belongs? This question raises significant abstract issues, including: the legitimacy and construction of nationstates; theories of democratic governance and legal systems; notions of citizenship; intersections between racialized, gendered, and classed social identities; and, processes of imperialism and colonization. The question also raises significant issues that are more concrete, including: access to public resources (such as education, housing, and health care); policies and processes of “legal” documentation; activist and community mobilization; sanctuary cities; U.S. and European military intervention; the militarization of law enforcement in the U.S. and abroad; neoliberal economic policies; and, ongoing anti- and post- colonial struggles across the globe. We thus invite scholars and activists from a range of disciplinary and professional positions to submit work (research articles, conceptual essays, book reviews, and poems) that illuminates these and other issues that are central to political struggle for the rights of immigrants, refugees, and migrants.

Submission Timeline Deadline: Friday, September 1, 2017
Anticipated Publication: January 2018