KC81: Dialogue as a Space of Relationship by Maria Flora Mangano

The next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. The goal is to expand the concepts available to discussions of intercultural dialogue. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF.

KC81 Dialogue as a Space of RelationshipMangano, M. F. (2017). Dialogue as a space of relationship. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 81. Available from https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/kc81-dialogue-as-space-of-relationship.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. Prior concepts are available on the main publications page. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept. Feel free to propose terms in any language, especially if they expand our ability to discuss an aspect of intercultural dialogue that is not easy to translate into English.

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Key Concept #37: Dialogic Listening Translated into Italian

Continuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting the translation of KC37: Dialogic Listening. Robyn Penman wrote this in 2014 and Maria Flora Mangano has now translated it into Italian with the help of Paola Giorgis. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available.

KC37 Dialogic Listening_ItalianPenman, R. (2017). Ascolto dialogico (M. F. Mangano with P. Giorgis, trans.). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 37. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/kc37-dialogic-listening_italian.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

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Constructing Intercultural Dialogues #3: Intergroup Dialogue & Service Learning

Following the recent announcement of a new series to be published by the Center for Intercultural Dialogue, the third issue of Constructing intercultural Dialogues is now available. The goal is to provide concrete examples of how actual people have managed to organize and hold intercultural dialogues, so that others may be inspired to do the same. As with the continuing CID series, Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, these may be downloaded for free. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF.

CICD 3 deTurkdeTurk, S. (2017). Intergroup dialogue and service learning: Students as facilitators. Constructing Intercultural Dialogues, 3. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/constructing-icd-3-deturk.pdf

If you have a case study you would like to share, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz.


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

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Constructing Intercultural Dialogues #2: Reconciliation

Following the recent announcement of a new series to be published by the Center for Intercultural Dialogue, the second issue of Constructing intercultural Dialogues is now available. The goal is to provide concrete examples of how actual people have managed to organize and hold intercultural dialogues, so that others may be inspired to do the same. As with the continuing CID series, Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, these may be downloaded for free. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF.

Contructing ICDs #2Mangano, M. F. (2017). Reconciliation. Constructing Intercultural Dialogues, 2. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/constructing-icd-2.pdf

If you have a case study you would like to share, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz.


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

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Constructing Intercultural Dialogues #1: Lullabies

Following the recent announcement of a new series to be published by the Center for Intercultural Dialogue, the first issue of Constructing intercultural Dialogues is now available. The goal is to provide concrete examples of how actual people have managed to organize and hold intercultural dialogues, so that others may be inspired to do the same. As with the continuing CID series, Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, these may be downloaded for free. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF.

Constructing ICD #1Maccioni, J. (2017). Lullabies. Constructing Intercultural Dialogues, 1. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/constructing-icd-1.pdf

If you have a case study you would like to share, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz.


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

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Key Concept #6 Intercultural Capital Translated into Spanish

Continuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting the translation of Intercultural Capital, written and now translated into Spanish by Andreas Pöllmann. Click on the thumbnail of the translation to read it.

KC6 intercultural capital_Spanish

Pöllmann, A. (2016). Capital intercultural. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 6. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.org/publications/

To see which other concepts have been translated into which languages, see the main publications page. The goal of the project is to expand the concepts available to discussions of intercultural dialogue beyond those who are fluent in English. If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue[at]gmail.com

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Key Concept #51 Critical Discourse Analysis Translated into Italian

As explained recently, some of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue are being translated into other languages than English. Today I am posting the translation of Critical Discourse Analysis, written and translated by Paola Giorgis. Click on the thumbnail of the translation to read it.

KC 51 CDA Italian

Giorgis, P. (2016). Analisi critica del discorso. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 51. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.org/publications/

To see which other concepts have been translated into which languages, see the main publications page. The goal of the project is to expand the concepts available to discussions of intercultural dialogue beyond those who are fluent in English. What began with a request to translate a few concepts into 2 languages has now developed into a serious effort to translate most of them. Choice of languages is being left up to those who are doing the work, which has prompted much interesting discussion about whether to be organized about this (translating all of them into a single language, then moving on to the next). Obviously the decision was  not to take that route. Instead, authors are being given the opportunity to translate their own into whatever languages they know best; once they respond, their concepts are put on a list of those available to requests from others. If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts listed there, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue[at]gmail.com

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Key Concept #76 Intercultural Sustainability Translated into German

As explained recently, some of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue are being translated into other languages than English. Today I am posting the translation of Intercultural Sustainability, originally written, and now translated into German, by Dominic Busch, of the Universität der Bundeswehr München, Germany.

KC76 intercultural sustainiability-GermanBusch, D. (2016). Interkulturelle Nachhaltigkeit. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 76. Available from https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.org/publications

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. And, as always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. As of this writing, 78 have been published in English, but words from Chinese, Portuguese, Japanese, Spanish, Belarusian, German and Arabic have also been introduced (with the discussion provided in English). As of this writing, I have received offers to translate one or more concepts into Arabic, Belarusian, Chinese, Finnish, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Kapampangan, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Tagalog, and Turkish (in alphabetical order). There is even a possibility of videos presenting American Sign Language versions. So if anyone else wants to join in the fun, just let me know.

To help readers find their way through the increasing numbers of concepts in various languages, instead of the promised flags being to the main publications page, which caused difficulties (languages and countries have different borders), translations are indicated by the use of the language turnstile. As the number of published translations increases, I’ll eventually add separate pages for each language.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialog[at]gmail.com

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Key Concept #12: Third Culture Kids Translated into Indonesian

As described a week ago, some of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue are being translated into other languages than English. I sent a note around to all those who wrote these up originally, and over the past week have heard back from more than half the group already, and have several drafts nearly ready to post. Today I am posting the translation of Third Culture Kids (TCKs), originally written, and now translated into Indonesian, by Anastasia Aldelina Lijadi, of the University of Macau.

 

KC 12 TCK Indonesian

Lijadi, A. A. (2016). Taruna Budaya Ketiga. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 12. Available from https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.org/publications

Rather than arranging for translation of all concepts into one language at a time, given the diversity of authors, it seems most appropriate to let each author translate their own work into their own languages. Several scholars who were not part of this original group have already written to ask permission to translate concepts, which will expand the number of translations for each concept. This may come across as a little disorganized, especially at the start when only a few translations appear. However, for ideological reasons, it seems the best choice. And it certainly has been a popular decision: I have never received so many offers to do so much work so quickly in response to a request!

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because several dozen are currently in process. And, as always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. As of this writing, 78 have been published in English, but words from Chinese, Portuguese, Japanese, Spanish, Belarusian, German and Arabic have also been introduced (with the discussion provided in English). As of this writing, I have received offers to translate one or more concepts into Arabic, Belarusian, Chinese, Finnish, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Kapampangan, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish and Tagalog (in alphabetical order). There is even a possibility of videos presenting American Sign Language versions. So if anyone else wants to join in the fun, just let me know.

To help readers find their way through the increasing numbers of concepts in various languages, I’m adding flags to the main publications page. As the translations increase, I’ll eventually add separate pages for each language.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialog[at]gmail.com

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Key Concept #78: Language and Intercultural Communication by Jane Jackson

The next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. The goal is to expand the concepts available to discussions of intercultural dialogue. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF.

KC78 Lg & ICC

Jackson, J. (2016). Language and intercultural communication. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 78. Available from https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.org/publications

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. Prior concepts are available on the main publications page. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept. Feel free to propose terms in any language, especially if they expand our ability to discuss an aspect of intercultural dialogue that is not easy to translate into English.

Save