Key Concept 41: Yuan Translated into Chinese

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting the translation of KC41: Yuan. Hui-Ching Chang wrote this in English in 2014 and has now translated it into both Traditional Chinese and Simplified Chinese. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC41 Yuan_Chinese-trad
Yuan in Traditional Chinese
KC41 Yuan_Chinese Simplified
Yuan in Simplified Chinese

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chang, H.-C. (2017). Yuan [Traditional Chinese]. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 41. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/01/kc-41-yuan_chinese-trad2.pdf

Chang, H.-C. (2017). Yuan [Simplified Chinese]. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 41. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/01/kc-41-yuan_chinese-simplified.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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Key Concept #41: Yuan by Hui-Ching Chang

Key Concepts in ICDToday’s issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available, and it does something different. This is the first word in a language other than English, and there are several other non-English words in process. The goal is to expand the concepts available to discussions of intercultural dialogue. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. Lists organized  chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

kc41-sm Chang, H.-C. (2014). Yuan. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 41. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2014/11/key-concept-yuan.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept. And starting today, feel free to propose terms in any language, especially if they expand our ability to discuss an aspect of intercultural dialogue that is not easy to translate into English.


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Hui-Ching Chang Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesAs Dean of the Honors College and Professor of Communication at the University at Albany, Dr. Hui-Ching Chang sees knowledge as intimately connected with everyday practices. After completing her law degree from National Taiwan University, she pursued advanced degrees in speech communication from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Hui-Ching Chang

Dr. Chang has studied Chinese language patterns, specifically Taiwanese national identity as constituted through discursive practices. Her book, Clever, Creative, Modest: The Chinese Language Practice (2010), examines Chinese language behavior from three distinctive yet overlapping dimensions: the manipulative speaker, the artistic speaker, and the humble speaker. Her most recent book, Language, Politics and Identity in Taiwan: Naming China (2015), explores how Taiwanese fashion their identities in the shifting and intertwined paths of five names Taiwan used to name China: “Communist bandits”; “Chinese Communists”; “mainland”; “opposite shore”; and the “People’s Republic of China.”

Prof. Chang has received many grants and top paper awards for her research and has been an invited keynote speaker at numerous international conferences. Her publications have appeared in Journal of Language and Politics; Discourse Studies; Research on Language and Social Interaction; Journal of Language and Social Psychology; Nationalism and Ethnic Studies; and Journal of Asian Pacific Communication, among others. Very recently she was principal editor of the special issue, “Explored but not Assumed: Revisiting Commonalities in Asian Pacific Communication” (2015), in the Journal of Asian Pacific Communication.

Prof. Chang enjoys putting theories into practice: “I firmly believe that it is adventure and personal engagement that brings intercultural communication to life, an inspiring perspective I learned while on ‘Semester at Sea’.” She was a Fulbright Scholar, Ukraine (2010-2011, 2012); Chair Professor of the College of Journalism at Xiamen University, China (2009-2012); Visiting Scholar to Hong Kong Baptist University (2007) and Visiting Scholar to National Taiwan University (2003-2004).

Prior to coming to UAlbany, Prof. Chang was Associate Dean for Academic Affairs of the Honors College, the University of Illinois at Chicago, and Faculty-in-Residence, where she pioneered innovative programs like “Cutie’s Office Hours” to promote a vibrant living-learning community. She served as Director of Undergraduate Studies and Director of Graduate Studies in her department, and was also a trained mediator for UIC’s Dispute Resolution Service. For her, being an Honors College administrator requires the same curiosity and urge to learn as it does for research and teaching—it is exciting, energizing, and fulfilling.