CID Poster #6: Dialogue Defined (reprise)

CID Posters(We are reprising the series of posters, because it has been several years since they were originally created, and they are much too wonderful to let them not be noticed by newcomers to the site!)

This is the next of the posters designed by Linda J. de Wit, then in her role as CID intern. For this poster, you literally have to look from a different perspective to read the quote; the picture of birds on a wire also represents taking different perspectives. The source of the quote is:

Leeds-Hurwitz, W. (2016). De la possession des compétences interculturelles au dialogue interculturel: Un cadre conceptuel [Moving from having intercultural competencies to constructing intercultural dialogues: A conceptual framework]. Les Politiques Sociales, 3/4, 7-22.

Dialogue DefinedJust in case anyone wants to cite this poster, the following would be the recommended format:

Center for Intercultural Dialogue. (2017). Dialogue defined. CID Posters, 6. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/08/dialogue.png

As with other series, CID Posters are available for free on the site; just click on the thumbnail to download a printable PDF. They may be downloaded, printed, and shared as is, without changes, without cost, so long as there is acknowledgment of the source.

As with other series, if you wish to contribute an original contribution, please send an email before starting any work to receive approval, to minimize inadvertent duplication, and to learn about technical requirements. As is the case with other CID Publications, posters should be created initially in English. Given that translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue have received so many views, anyone who wishes to translate their own poster into another language (or two) is invited to provide that as well. If you want to volunteer to translate someone else’s poster into a language in which you are fluent, send in a note before starting, to receive approval and to confirm no one else is working on the same one.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

CID Poster #5: Communication as Culture Definition (reprise)

CID Posters(We are reprising the series of posters, because it has been several years since they were originally created, and they are much too wonderful to let them not be noticed by newcomers to the site!)

This is the next of the posters designed by Linda J. de Wit, then in her role as CID intern. The painting is Winter Landscape with Ice Skaters, by Dutch painter Hendrick Avercamp, painted around 1608. It is on display in the Dutch national museum Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, which has made many of its paintings available online in high resolution and copyright free. The painting illustrates the quote not only because it shows social interaction, but also because ice skating is considered a typical example of Dutch culture (and recently has officially been named part of Dutch cultural heritage). The silhouettes are designs from vecteezy.com. The quote comes from the following book:

Leeds-Hurwitz, W. (1989). Communication in everyday life: A social interpretation. Norwood, NJ: Ablex.

Communication as Culture

Just in case anyone wants to cite this poster, the following would be the recommended format:

Center for Intercultural Dialogue. (2017). Communication as culture definition. CID Posters, 5. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/07/communication.png

As with other series, CID Posters are available for free on the site; just click on the thumbnail to download a printable PDF. They may be downloaded, printed, and shared as is, without changes, without cost, so long as there is acknowledgment of the source.

As with other series, if you wish to contribute an original contribution, please send an email before starting any work to receive approval, to minimize inadvertent duplication, and to learn about technical requirements. As is the case with other CID Publications, posters should be created initially in English. Given that translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue have received so many views, anyone who wishes to translate their own poster into another language (or two) is invited to provide that as well. If you want to volunteer to translate someone else’s poster into a language in which you are fluent, send in a note before starting, to receive approval and to confirm no one else is working on the same one.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

CID Poster #4: Types of Cultural Communication (reprise)

CID Posters(We are reprising the series of posters, because it has been several years since they were originally created, and they are much too wonderful to let them not be noticed by newcomers to the site!)

This is the next of the posters designed by Linda J. de Wit, then in her role as CID intern. The need for clarification between intercultural/ intracultural/ cross-cultural/ international forms of communication has been made obvious by the number of times I’ve been asked to explain the differences. These terms have been discussed at length in many publications; one direct source is:

Leeds-Hurwitz, W. (1990). Culture and communication: A review essay. Quarterly Journal of Speech, 76, 85-96.

The idea to use fruit for the visual explanation of the different terms was Linda’s, and came from proverbs: in English, one is told not to compare apples and oranges; in many other languages, the fruits referred to are apples and pears. The poster thus implicitly refers to the relativist idea that cultures shouldn’t be judged in comparison to others.

Types of Cultural Communication
Just in case anyone wants to cite this poster, the following would be the recommended format:

Center for Intercultural Dialogue. (2017). Types of cultural communication. CID Posters, 4. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/07/fruit.png

As with other series, CID Posters are available for free on the site; just click on the thumbnail to download a printable PDF. They may be downloaded, printed, and shared as is, without changes, without cost, so long as there is acknowledgment of the source.

As with other series, if you wish to contribute an original contribution, please send an email before starting any work to receive approval, to minimize inadvertent duplication, and to learn about technical requirements. As is the case with other CID Publications, posters should be created initially in English. Given that translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue have received so many views, anyone who wishes to translate their own poster into another language (or two) is invited to provide that as well. If you want to volunteer to translate someone else’s poster into a language in which you are fluent, send in a note before starting, to receive approval and to confirm no one else is working on the same one.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

CID Poster #3: Intercultural Dialogue (reprise)

CID Posters(We are reprising the series of posters, because it has been several years since they were originally created, and they are much too wonderful to let them not be noticed by newcomers to the site!)

This is the third of the posters designed by Linda J. de Wit, then in her role as CID intern. The quote by Peter Praxmarer does not come from a publication, but from a Skype conversation we had on April 25, 2017. I was struck by what he said, and how nicely it summed up the concept of intercultural dialogue, and requested permission to turn the definition into a poster, and he graciously agreed. In terms of visual design, Linda indicated “art” by the picture frame, and “science” by the design in the background. Hopefully this definition will find a wide audience, because I think it does a better and more concise job of explaining intercultural dialogue than other definitions I’ve seen.

Intercultural Dialogue definition

Just in case anyone wants to cite this poster, the following would be the recommended format:

Center for Intercultural Dialogue. (2017). Intercultural Dialogue. CID Posters, 3. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/07/art-and-science.png

As with other series, CID Posters are available for free on the site; just click on the thumbnail to download a printable PDF. They may be downloaded, printed, and shared as is, without changes, without cost, so long as there is acknowledgment of the source.

As with other series, if you wish to contribute an original contribution, please send an email before starting any work to receive approval, to minimize inadvertent duplication, and to learn about technical requirements. As is the case with other CID Publications, posters should be created initially in English. Given that translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue have received so many views, anyone who wishes to translate their own poster into another language (or two) is invited to provide that as well. If you want to volunteer to translate someone else’s poster into a language in which you are fluent, send in a note before starting, to receive approval and to confirm no one else is working on the same one.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

CID Poster #2: Key Concepts as the World (reprise)

CID Posters(We are reprising the series of posters, because it has been several years since they were originally created, and they are much too wonderful to let them not be noticed by newcomers to the site!)

This is the second of the posters designed by Linda J. de Wit, then in her role as CID intern. This poster names all of the 81 Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue published to the site by the time this was created, bringing them together into a representation of the world.

Key Concepts poster

Just in case anyone wants to cite this poster, the following would be the recommended format:

Center for Intercultural Dialogue. (2017). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue. CID Posters, 2. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.org/2017/07/07/cid-poster-2-key…pts-as-the-world/

As with other series, CID Posters are available for free on the site; just click on the thumbnail to download a printable PDF. They may be downloaded, printed, and shared as is, without changes, without cost, so long as there is acknowledgment of the source.

As with other series, if you wish to contribute an original contribution, please send an email before starting any work to receive approval, to minimize inadvertent duplication, and to learn about technical requirements. As is the case with other CID Publications, posters should be created initially in English. Given that translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue have received so many views, anyone who wishes to translate their own poster into another language (or two) is invited to provide that as well. If you want to volunteer to translate someone else’s poster into a language in which you are fluent, send in a note before starting, to receive approval and to confirm no one else is working on the same one.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

CID Poster #1: Intercultural Communication/Competence/Dialogue (reprise)

CID Posters(We are reprising the series of posters, because it has been several years since they were originally created, and they are much too wonderful to let them not be noticed by newcomers to the site!)

This is the first of the posters designed by Linda J. de Wit, then in her role as CID intern. This one provides a quick and easy way to understand, and differentiate between, the concepts of “intercultural communication,” “intercultural competence,” and “intercultural dialogue,” using a rooster and a sheep to represent members of different cultures (and she notes that the animals are vector designs by vecteezy.com). The article where these explanations of these concepts (as well as lots of other concepts) were published is:

Leeds-Hurwitz, W. (2016). De la possession des compétences interculturelles au dialogue interculturel: Un cadre conceptuel [Moving from having intercultural competencies to constructing intercultural dialogues: A conceptual framework]. Les Politiques Sociales, 3/4, 7-22.

Intercultural communication/competence/dialogue

Just in case anyone wants to cite this poster, the following would be the recommended format:

Center for Intercultural Dialogue. (2017). Intercultural communication, intercultural competence, intercultural dialogue. CID Posters, 1. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.org/2017/06/28/cid-poster-1/

As with other series, CID Posters are available for free on the site; just click on the thumbnail to download a printable PDF. They may be downloaded, printed, and shared as is, without changes, without cost, so long as there is acknowledgment of the source.

This series is open to submissions. If you wish to contribute an original design, please send an email before starting any work to receive approval, to minimize inadvertent duplication, and to learn about technical requirements. As is the case with other CID Publications, posters should be created initially in English. Given that translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue have received so many views, where specific quotes are provided, anyone who wishes to translate their own poster into another language (or two) is invited to design that as well. If you want to volunteer to translate someone else’s poster into a language in which you are fluent, send in a note before starting, to receive approval and to confirm no one else is working on the same one.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

CID Poster #14: 10 Ideas

CID Posters

This is a bonus poster, designed by Linda J. de Wit who was the CID intern in 2017, and who has now returned as an occasional graphic design consultant.

This poster illustrates the recommendations of the CID Focus Groups Report for UNESCO’s Futures of Education Initiative to add a 10th idea to their list of 9 ideas, as described in their report, Education in a post-COVID world: Nine ideas for public action.

CID Poster 14: 10 Ideas

In the report, we ask that they consider intercultural dialogue as essential to learning to live together.

Intercultural dialogue permits not merely living together with a wide range of other people but living together with (and despite) our differences, taking empathy, compassion, and respect for all as a given.

Just in case anyone wants to cite this poster, the following would be the recommended format:

Center for Intercultural Dialogue. (2020). Ten ideas. CID Posters, 14. Available from:

As with other series, CID Posters are available for free on the site; just click on the thumbnail to download a printable PDF. This may be downloaded, printed, and shared as is, without changes, without cost, so long as there is acknowledgment of the source.

As with other series, if you wish to contribute an original contribution, please send an email before starting any work to receive approval, to minimize inadvertent duplication, and to learn about technical requirements. As is the case with other CID Publications, posters should be created initially in English. If you want to volunteer to translate a poster into a language in which you are fluent, send in a note before starting, to receive approval.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

CID Poster #13: The Blind Men and the Elephant

CID PostersThis is a bonus poster, designed by Linda J. de Wit who was the CID intern in 2017, and who has now returned as graphic design consultant. It illustrates the common expression “the blind men and the elephant” used to describe what can happen when only parts of something are examined, rather than the whole.

CID Poster 13: The blind men and the elephant:

The image was prepared to illustrate the first of the the newest CID series: In Dialogue: CID Occasional Papers, to be published shortly, by Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. The quote integrated into the poster comes from that paper. It says:

The different approaches to intercultural dialogue might be described as a set of blind men studying individual aspects of the elephant, never realizing there is an entire beast. Those who have stepped back to see the entire animal deserve special attention.

Just in case anyone wants to cite this poster, the following would be the recommended format:

Center for Intercultural Dialogue. (2020). The blind men and the elephant. CID Posters, 13. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2020/06/the-blind-men-and-the-elephant.png

As with other series, CID Posters are available for free on the site; just click on the thumbnail to download a printable PDF. They may be downloaded, printed, and shared as is, without changes, without cost, so long as there is acknowledgment of the source.

As with other series, if you wish to contribute an original contribution, please send an email before starting any work to receive approval, to minimize inadvertent duplication, and to learn about technical requirements. As is the case with other CID Publications, posters should be created initially in English. If you want to volunteer to translate a poster into a language in which you are fluent, send in a note before starting, to receive approval.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

CID Poster #12: The Elephant in the Room

CID PostersThis is a bonus poster, designed by Linda J. de Wit who was the CID intern in 2017, and who has now returned as graphic design consultant. It illustrates the common expression “the elephant in the room” used to describe something which is obvious but not being discussed openly.

CID Poster 12: The elephant in the room

The image was prepared to illustrate the first of the the newest CID series: In Dialogue: CID Occasional Papers, to be published shortly, by Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. The quote integrated into the poster comes from that paper. It says:

Intercultural dialogue might be called the elephant in the room, a metaphor referring to something obvious which is none-theless ignored. Most often, practitioners and diplomats use the term intercultural dialogue, but they rarely define it, and conduct little to no research in order to discover how it works, but only hold it up as a desired end. Academics, who certainly conduct research, rarely use this term, thus have rarely studied it, although some research by other names sheds light on how it works.

Just in case anyone wants to cite this poster, the following would be the recommended format:

Center for Intercultural Dialogue. (2020). The elephant in the room. CID Posters, 12. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2020/06/the-elephant-in-the-room.png

As with other series, CID Posters are available for free on the site; just click on the thumbnail to download a printable PDF. They may be downloaded, printed, and shared as is, without changes, without cost, so long as there is acknowledgment of the source.

As with other series, if you wish to contribute an original contribution, please send an email before starting any work to receive approval, to minimize inadvertent duplication, and to learn about technical requirements. As is the case with other CID Publications, posters should be created initially in English. If you want to volunteer to translate a poster into a language in which you are fluent, send in a note before starting, to receive approval.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

CID Poster #11: Language and Intercultural Communication

CID PostersThis is CID Poster #11, designed by Brandon Peña, illustrating a quote related to KC78: Language and Intercultural Communication by Jane Jackson. This is the first designed by someone other than Linda J. de Wit. It came about because he is a student of Anna Klyueva, at the University of Houston-Clear Lake, and she turned posters into a course project (other faculty are welcome to do so as well, of course).

CID Poster #11: Language and Intercultural Communication

Just in case anyone wants to cite this poster, the following would be the recommended format:

Center for Intercultural Dialogue. (2018). Language and intercultural communication. CID Posters, 11. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2018/02/language-and-intercultural-communication-poster.png

As with other series, CID Posters are available for free on the site; just click on the thumbnail to download a printable PDF. They may be downloaded, printed, and shared as is, without changes, without cost, so long as there is acknowledgment of the source.

As with other series, if you wish to contribute an original contribution, please send an email before starting any work to receive approval, to minimize inadvertent duplication, and to learn about technical requirements. As is the case with other CID Publications, posters should be created initially in English. Given that translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue have received so many views, anyone who wishes to translate their own poster into another language (or two) is invited to provide that as well. If you want to volunteer to translate someone else’s poster into a language in which you are fluent, send in a note before starting, to receive approval and to confirm no one else is working on the same one.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

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