ICA in Prague 2018 (Czech Republic)

ConferencesThe International Communication Association will hold its annual convention 24-27 May 2018 in Prague (Czech Republic).

Against a backdrop of evolving technologies and shifting sociocultural and political dynamics, the 2018 ICA conference theme, Voices, encourages scholars to delve more deeply into a concept inextricably linked with communication.

Examined from multiple epistemological approaches, a host of methodologies, and numerous levels of analysis, studying voice – or the plurality of voices – can illuminate the process by which it is fostered and/or constrained as well as the conditions under which it is expressed and/or stifled. More important, the study of voice can shed light on the process by which it impacts behaviors, defines relationships, influences policies, and shapes the world in which we live. In other words, the conference theme encourages the submission of scholarship that examines voice vis-à-vis various discourses, actors, processes, and outcomes.

The significance of voice is reflected in contemporary debates around domestic and transnational issues such as the environment and immigration. It also plays a critical role in numerous systems, regardless of whether these systems are bound interpersonally, organizationally, culturally, politically, or socially. Irrespective of the domain of study, the conference theme Voices encourages scholars to address key questions related to:

* Theorizing about voice
* The creation and representation of voice
* The expression of voice
* The impact of voice

Before and after each annual conference, ICA hosts pre- and postconferences. These sessions are either all-day or half-day miniconferences, intended as an extension of the main ICA conference, but separate in terms of budget, programming, and administration.

For the 2018 Prague conference, space in the hotel is limited. While we have approximately 20 slots within the hotels, ICA also accepts proposals for pre/postconferences to be held outside of the hotel and even outside of Prague. All off-site preconferences outside Prague should be held on Wednesday, 24 May, with the following day 25 May given to travelling to Prague. All on-site (in the conference hotels) preconferences will be held on Thursday, 25 May with an end time of 5pm.

All postconferences will be on Tuesday, 29 May if in the hotel or elsewhere in Prague, or Wednesday or later if outside Prague. If you choose to have an off-site conference, you may either propose a location you have already obtained in advance or you may mark on your proposal form that you wish to speak with our local host for help in determining a location.

If you are interested in planning and submitting a preconference or postconference proposal please fill out the proposal form by Thursday, 1 September 2017. More detailed instructions are within the application form. If you have questions after reading the form, please contact Jennifer Le (jleATicahdq.org).

ICA Regional Conference: Lodz (Poland) 2015

International Communication Association REGIONAL CONFERENCE
Expanding Communication: Old Boundaries and New Frontiers

The ICA Lodz regional conference, organized jointly by 8 European universities and with the cooperation of the Polish Communication Association (PCA), under the auspices of the International Communication Association, will take place on 9-11 April, 2015 at the University of Lodz, Poland.

Topics
We welcome paper submissions on a broad range of topics ranging from intercultural communication across diverse borders and bridges, old boundaries and new frontiers: transformations in audiences and societies, to the ethical issues in communication, domain-specific, Internet and mediated communication, AV translation and interpreting as well as the relationship among semiotic codes used in communication. Some of the topics are given below, but the list is not exhaustive:
*New Frontiers in European Communication Research
*Communication theory and research
*Interpersonal and organizational communication
*Journalism and media studies
*Language and Social Interaction
*Intercultural communication and Ethnicity and Race
*Communication and Technology
*Literature and performance studies
*Popular culture studies
*Meaning, Context and Cognition (MCC) in Communication
*Writing research and instruction, intercultural rhetoric
*Political Communication
*Public Relations, Advertising, Propaganda, Promotion
*Visual/Graphic Communication
*Communication ethics
*Feminist and LGBT Studies
*Education and media literacy

Plenary Speakers:
*Boguslawa Dobek-Ostrowska (The Former President of the Polish Communication Association, University of Wrocław)
*Sonia Livingstone (London School of Eonomics)
*Ayse Lahur Kirtunc (Ege University)
*Francois Heinderyckx (President ICA, Free University Brussels)
*Jef Verschueren (International Pragmatics Association, Antwerp University)
*Piotr Cap (University of Lodz)

Individual Submissions must be completed online no later than 23:00 EST 15th November, 2014. Get the Call.

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Digital Transformations, Social Media Engagement & the Asian Century (Australia)

Planning is highly advanced for the International Communication Association Regional Conference, Digital Transformations, Social Media Engagement, and the Asian Century, to be held at the Queensland U of Technology (Gardens Point campus) from 1-3 October 2014.

The conference has a very exciting range of keynote speakers, including incoming ICA President Peter Vorderer (U of Mannheim), Mohan Dutta (National U of Singapore), Cynthia Stohl (U of California Santa Barbara), Jack Linchuan Qiu (Chinese U of Hong Kong), Yi-Hui Christine Huang (Chinese U of Hong Kong), ICA fellows Cindy Gallois (U of Queensland) and John Hartley (Curtin U), Lance Bennett (U of Washington), Christoph Neuberger (LMU U, Munich), and Stuart Cunningham (Queensland U of Technology).

There will be a range of special events taking place, including a forum on “Science Communication in the Digital Age” hosted by the U of Queensland at the historic Customs House, and “Crisis Communication in Chinese Context”, sponsored by the Public Relations Institute of Australia. There are also special lunchtime sessions on academic publishing convened by the Australian and New Zealand Communication Association (ANZCA) and Taylor & Francis, as well as over 50 paper sessions, panels and poster sessions.

Information on the conference can be found on the conference website. Early bird registration ($300 for faculty and $150 for graduate students) is available until 22 August 2014, with final registration by 12 September 2014. A draft program can be accessed from the conference website, as well as information about accommodation in Brisbane.

CFP Affiliate Journal Initiative by ICA

New Affiliate Journal Initiative Developed for International Communication Association (ICA)
by Cynthia Stohl, Immediate Past President, University of California – Santa Barbara
(from ICA Newsletter for May 2014)

ICA has just announced the inaugural call for applications for ICA Affiliate Journal status. In January, 2014 the ICA Board established a new journal category, “Affiliate Journal.” An affiliate journal is published independently of ICA, in a language other than English, and meets or exceeds the general standards of an ICA journal and the specific standards developed for affiliate journals. Once approved by the ICA board, the affiliate journal will carry the ICA imprimatur and will be designated as such on the ICA website. An affiliate journal will be available to ICA members on line for free or at a discount.

The procedures and guidelines for this Affiliate Journal initiative will be operative for a trial period of three years. A maximum of two journals will be selected for this initial phase. For the first 2 years journal editors of the affiliate journals will provide the ICA Board with an annual report submitted one month before the annual meeting. During the third year a comprehensive formal review will be conducted by a specially appointed affiliate journal evaluation committee comprised of members of ICA’s Executive Committee and at least one appointed member from both the ICA board and the publication Committee. At that time the entire program will be evaluated, long term procedures for continued assessment and evaluation will be established, and decisions will be made regarding continuing affiliate status for the journal.

Rationale
The Affiliate Journal initiative serves several of the internationalization goals articulated by the EC and the ICA Board. Affiliate journals build bridges with the international communication community, connect our membership with research published in non- English high quality journals, help publicize the finest communication research done throughout the world, and give our members access to new and diverse audiences.

To be accepted as an affiliate journal, the editorial management must agree to publish extended abstracts of each article in every issue in English. Other efforts to share research not typically published in English are encouraged. An affiliate journal might for example, invite English language reviews of literature of research in a particular area that has not been readily accessible to most members of ICA. Efforts to enable ICA members to share their work with colleagues working in other languages are also highly desirable. Affiliate journals may, for example, publish interviews (both in English and the official language of the journal) with scholars who typically publish in a language other than the official language of the journal. On line or in print for free or at a discount, English language extended abstracts will be available for free online.

Application Procedures
Criteria for selection and the application form can be found here. If you have any questions please contact Cynthia Stohl, Chair, Affiliate Journal Committee at  or Michael Haley, ICA Executive Director.

CFP Work, success, happiness, good life

ICA PRECONFERENCE: (RE)DEFINING AND (RE)NEGOTIATING THE MEANING OF WORK, SUCCESS, HAPPINESS, AND GOOD LIFE

Organizational Communication Division
Date: May 22nd, 2014
8:00 am- 5:00 pm

Sheraton Seattle Hotel
[With an off-site visit to The Seattle Glassblowing Studio]

CALL FOR PAPERS
What is the role of work in constructing “the good life”? How have our definitions of what it means to work, be successful, and be happy evolved over the years? This preconference examines questions about work and life including the important practical, social, and theoretical concerns surrounding these issues.

Aspiring to lead a good life almost mandates that every aspect of one’s life align with the individual’s personal definition of what constitutes a ‘good’ life in the first place. This idea though unequivocally includes pursuing a professional life of passion, pride, dignity, and worthy of one’s time, skills, and energy. At this pre-conference we will bring together scholars who have an interest in examining the constraints and opportunities for a good life and how that definition is shaped discursively by the different contextual factors that determine our material work-life realities. While there are multiple lenses with which to view one’s good life, we circumscribe our pre-conference within specific frames of work and its allied implications within, between, and outside of organizations.

We invite you to submit short papers (7-10 pages excluding references) pertaining to the following five themes: Socialization and Ethics, Immigrant Experiences of Meanings of Work, Sociopathic Demands of Modern Work, Positive Emotions at Work, and Career and Personal Life Sustainability (please see descriptions below):

Facilitators and Respondents:
Suchitra Shenoy-Packer (co-organizer)
Elena Gabor (co-organizer)
Patrice M. Buzzanell
Majia Nadesan
Dan Lair
Pamela Lutgen-Sandvik

Instructions for Papers:
1.     Please submit short papers (7-10 pages excluding References) in APA (6th Edition) format directly to Suchitra Shenoy-Packer and Elena Gabor by March 1, 2014.
2.     Clearly state the theme to which you are submitting your paper on the cover page (include your name, affiliation, and academic position (e.g., grad student, professor).
3.     The questions we provide under each theme are examples to get you started and thinking about the scope of each area. We encourage potential contributors to redefine and renegotiate the meanings of work, success, happiness, and the good life as they deem befitting the different themes.
4.     A total of 24 papers will be competitively selected for the pre-conference.

Theme 1: Socialization & Ethics

The socialization and ethics themes individually or collectively, will explore discourses about work circulating in, and produced by, socialization agents (e.g., Jablin: family, friends, media, education, part-time work). Here, the interest would be in how institutional discourses such as media and education discourses-about work produce discursive resources that shape our understandings of and expectations for work.
For those interested in the ethics theme exclusively, we encourage the exploration of meaningful work as a decidedly ethical question. We spend a great deal of time thinking through the ethical dimensions of communication at work, both in general (e.g., whistleblowing) and in relation to specific occupations/professions (e.g., medical ethics). What are some of these thoughts that translate to research and contemporary visions of leading good work-life?

To submit papers to this theme, participants are invited to submit short papers that address one or more of the following questions: How do socialization discourses influence the manner in which we make sense of what work means, the role it plays in our lives, and the nature of the working world? How do they enable/constrain the choices that we make in pursuit of meaningful work in our lives? What does it look like when we consider the question of work itself from a distinctly ethical framework? What are the ethical dimensions of the ways in which we talk about work? For instance, what are the ethical implications when we elevate some forms of work, and not others, as “meaningful”? If the choices that we make about work have implications for ourselves, our families, our communities, our world, and if those choices are implicated by communication about work, what are the ethical dimensions of the ways in which we speak about work?

Theme 2: Immigrants Experiences of Meanings of Work

Finding meaning in work has been argued as being the prerogative of the fortunate few who have the choice of discriminating between the work (or non-work) options available to them. But, what happens to this choice when the desire to do so takes individuals to foreign lands in the hopes of exercising that choice and finding meaningful work? Immigration is not a single event of being uprooted from the culture of origin and leaving behind the homeland to face the challenge of assimilation into a new culture. Rather it is a lifelong, multifaceted and multilayered, complex, and never-ending experience. With this theme, we start from the assumption that voluntary immigration is a deliberate decision to change one’s life, often, but not necessarily, driven by the optimism of finding personally significant and self-defined meaningful work.

Immigrant workers are known to experience stress related to their visa status, language proficiency, money, loss of connections and status in the work context, discounting of skills acquired in their native countries, ethnic/gender discrimination, feelings of isolation and insufficient orientation to new job skills, and wages based discrimination, to name a few.

To submit papers to this theme, participants are invited to submit short papers addressing how immigrants construct the meaning of work in their lives? Within the larger frame of meanings of work, some examples of questions are: How does voluntary or involuntary immigration influence work values and transform (or if it does) work ethic? On the other hand, how do lessons learned about work in one’s native country complicate workplace relationships in a host country? Do degrees of adaptations/assimilation change immigrants’ meaning-making initiatives? Are meanings of work consciously constructed and do they differ across types and scope of work? How are (or are they?) meanings of work differently enabled and enacted by immigrant entrepreneurs versus working professionals versus unskilled laborers versus those compelled to immigrate as refugees or asylum seekers?

Theme 3: Sociopathic Demands of Modern Work

Sociopathy is arguably an entrenched feature of modern capitalism. For-profits institutionalize sociopathy in the relentless pursuit of profits and market growth. Non-profits and government organizations, including universities, increasingly resemble for-profits in operations and decision-making logics. The result of this focus on growth and profits include resource exhaustion, environmental degradation, social antipathy, and the degradation of the human spirit. Instrumentalization and prioritization of unrestrained growth constrain praxis, that is, they constrain the possibilities for making socially proactive meanings out of everyday work activities as daily activities are typically subordinated to the demands of efficiency, expediency, growth and/or profitability.

Participants are invited to submit short papers that address the following questions: How can alternative, socially pro-active meanings be generated from the instrumental and often sociopathic demands of modern work? How can alternative meanings be introduced into institutional life so as to counter or temper sociopathic practices and decision-making? Is it possible to transform capitalism itself from the ground up so that opportunities for generating alternative and socially pro-active meanings are actually institutionalized in organizational decision-making and practice?

Theme 4: Positive Emotions at Work

Notwithstanding the tendency to focus on the pitfalls and problems of organizational life, being an organization member can also provide extraordinary, positive experiences. Sensing others’ appreciation can make endeavors feel worthwhile and open creative channels in previously unrecognized directions. A heartfelt thank you can contribute to an overall sense of contentment, infusing a positive mood workers subsequently bring home. Positive emotion is associated with improved overall health and longevity; increased altruism, courtesy, and conscientiousness in organizations; enhanced tendencies to assist others; and increased creativity and innovation at work and the experiences that evoke positive emotions.

Although a number of experiences elicit positive affect for employees, one of the most powerful is positive managerial communication (PMC). In fact, people point to these experiences as nothing less than life changing, the effects of which last years after the experiences. The Broaden and Build Theory of Positive Emotions suggests that “positive emotions … broaden peoples’ momentary thought-action repertoires,” which are the possibilities for actions or responses we contemplate and then use when in an emotional state. The theory also argues that “positive emotions promote discovery of novel and creative actions, ideas and social bonds, which in turn build that individual’s personal resources; ranging from physical and intellectual resources, to social and psychological resources” (Fredrickson, 2004).

Participants are invited to submit short papers that address the following questions: Within the framework of meanings of work/meaningful work, how do negative emotions contribute to positive emotions in terms of organizational life? How do positive communicative events at work contribute to positive upward spirals? How does emotional contagion work in terms of positivity and how might this influence meaning making? Why do praise, reward, and appreciation mean so much to workers and what cultural forces might be behind the importance of these to workers? What is the state of our current knowledge about communication and positivity at work?

Theme 5 Career and Personal Life Sustainability

Returning to the overarching theme of “the good life” and the role that the meaningfulness of work has in constructing a good life, this section centers on ways to research, challenge, and design meaningful career and personal life sustainability. This theme has three parts. First, work-and-life communication scholarship and everyday discussions typically prioritize work over other life considerations. In this preconference theme, the focus is on the sustainability of career, as the theme and structure that underlie and make coherent the work that people do, and of personal life, as the value of friendship, family, leisure, volunteering, spirituality, and other activities. Yet it is not simply sustainability but ways to fuse and transcend career and personal life intersections that requires attention from communication scholars. Second, the emphasis is on design as a process for achieving the good life and meaningfulness. Design is the architecture of and processes within and across career and personal life. Design can be predictive, adaptive, visionary, and/or transformative in its problem setting and solving capacities. Transformative design engages inner and outer environments in ways that create alternative stories from which designers choose. Designers construct visions of valued futures, of which the good life would be prominent. Finally, this preconference theme does not assume that everyone has an equal chance and choice to achieve the good life.

Participants are invited to submit short papers that address the following questions: How can individuals, potentially living dilemmatic lives amidst agency and constraints construct meaningful and “good” work lives? How can our interpretations of meaningful careers and personal life sustainability get defined and redefined in today’s turbulent work environments? How can we sustain work-life balances that transcend personal gains and embody holistic mindfulness that recruits partners, family members, community, and others as co-scripters of a good life?

Due Date: March 1st, 2014

Sponsored by:
Bradley University, Peoria, Illinois, USA
DePaul University, Chicago, Illinois, USA
Management Communication Quarterly

Check Out Our New Brochure!

Exciting news: Our new brochure just got on the shelf. Check it out to learn more about the Center for Intercultural Dialogue and don’t forget to share it with anyone who might be interested in our work!

cidbrochure_1

cidbrochure_2

Download CID brochure

 

CFP 2nd Latin Am ICA conf Brazil 2014

2nd Latin America ICA Conference
Dialogues between Tradition and Contemporaneity in the Latin America and International Communication Studies (University of Brasilia, 26-28 de March, 2014)

ICA

Call for Papers
The Graduate Program in Communication of UNB and the International Communication Association (ICA) are pleased to invite you to submit papers for the 4th Latin American Conference ICA. Two forms are accepted, papers to WGs and proposition panels.

Deadline for submissions of papers and panel proposals: Until 15th January, 2014
Notification of acceptance: 29th January, 2014
Registration deadline at reduced fees: Until 5th February, 2014
Conference: 26-28 March, 2014

Registration will be open from November 30, 2013

Conference Chair: Luiz C. Martino
The organizing committee: Fernanda Martineli, Fernando Paulino, Liliane Machado, L.C. Martino e Sérgio de Sá.
Partners: ALAIC, SBPJor, INTERCOM, ABRAPCORP

ICA 2013

icaOn June 17, 2013, I was one of three co-authors of a paper entitled “Robert E. Park’s contribution to the history of intercultural communication” for the New Histories of Communication Study Preconference, at the International Communication Association convention in London. My co-authors were Filipa Subtil and José Luis Garcia, who I met last year while in Portugal. Dave Park, Peter Simonson and Philip Lodge did a great job of organizing the preconference. A group photo of 60 of the 80 participants is available here.

And after the preconference came the conference proper. ICA has really worked on becoming a more truly international organization (it’s now up to about 45% international members). As a result, this conference was the perfect ending for the last six months of travel because I connected again with other scholars I had last met in the countries where they live and work: China (Jiang Fei and Kuo Huang), Saila Poutiainen (Finland), John Wilson (Northern Ireland), Saskia Witteborn and Ling Chen (Hong Kong), Todd Sandel (Macau), Tamar Katriel, Esther Schely-Newman and Ifat Maoz (Israel), Cindy Gallois and Jeff Pittam (Australia). And Casey Lum, who I last met in Hong Kong, though he lives in the US. Of course, I also met a variety of friends and colleagues, both international and from the US (Richard Buttny, Theresa Castor, Don Ellis, Larry Gross, Beth Haslett, Evelyn Ho, Klaus Krippendorff, Dave Park, Jeff Pooley, Jeff Robinson, Karen Tracy and Bob Craig, Steve Wilson, Cynthia Stohl, Bill Eadie, Natasha Shrikant, François Cooren (Canada), Akiba Cohen (Israel), Olga Ivanovna Matyash (Russia), among many others – sorry not to be able to name everyone!), as well as several directly connected with this Center or the Council that is its parent organization (Linda Steiner, Brenda Berkelaar, Michael Haley). And I was glad to discover new international colleagues (Sheila Lodge, UK; Marion Wrenn, now at Princeton, but shortly to be in Abu Dhabi; John Laprise, Qatar; Zrinjka Peruško, Croatia; Boguslawa Dobek-Ostrowska, Poland; Raul Fuentes Navarro, Mexico; Peter Putnis, Australia, among others). As a result, some new researcher profiles and guest posts will be appearing on this site over the next month or so. Some of the conversations were about the possibilities permitted by social media and new publishing choices, so stay tuned for additions to this site as a result.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

ICA regional conf in China

Extended Deadline for the First Co-Sponsored ICA Regional Conference in the People’s Republic of China

The deadline for submitting papers to ICA’s first Co-Sponsored Regional Conference in the People’s Republic of China [PRC] has been extended to June 1, 2013! Co-hosted by 18 Chinese associations and institutions, the theme of “Communication and Social Transformation” crosses communication contexts and offers specific opportunities for networking and institutional collaborations. This regional conference will be hosted in Shanghai on November 8-10, 2013. Full details about the conference–including free wifi at and the convenient location of the conference hotel to cultural sites, as well as information about submissions and presentations in Chinese or English–are listed here.

The conference hotel, the Pullman Shanghai Skyway hotel, is easily accessible from the Pudong International Airport by Metro or taxi. For first-time visitors to Shanghai who would like to be greeted at the airport, the website offers details about making these arrangements with our hosts.

As noted in the May 2013 ICA Newsletter, officials from our host universities/ associations in China and ICA President Cynthia Stohl will welcome conference participants. Of special interest is the plenary address by the top official of Sina.Com. Seven Chinese scholars from top universities have been invited to present keynote addresses-we are awaiting their responses to our invitations. Keynote speakers who already have accepted include: Bill Dutton (Professor and founding Director of the Oxford Internet Institute, Professorial Fellow of Balliol College), Jan Servaes (UNESCO Chair in Communication for Sustainable Social Change, University of Massachusetts Amherst), Stephen Reese (Jesse H. Jones Professor of Journalism at the University of Texas at Austin), and Maureen Taylor (Gaylord Family Chair of Strategic Communication, Oklahoma University). ICA Communication Director John Paul (JP) Gutierrez will discuss impact factors and keys to media exposure.

In discussion sessions, leading faculty from around the globe will talk about the changing nature of (future) communication scholarship and engagement, entrepreneurship education, and the city, among other topics. Conversations will continue during an (optional) tour of an ancient Chinese water village close to Shanghai on the day following the official close of the ICA Regional Conference.

For further information, please contact Qian WANG, assistant professor in The School of Media and Design at Shanghai Jiao Tong University (icashanghai2013 AT gmail.com) or Patrice M. Buzzanell (buzzanel AT purdue.edu), Professor in the Brian Lamb School of Communication at Purdue University, SJTU Advisory Board member, and ICA Liaison for this regional conference in China.  The Call for Papers is posted on the ICA website for details.

Send papers to: icashanghai2013 AT gmail.com

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Intercultural journal article award

The Intercultural Communication Division of the International Communication Association (ICA) Journal Article Award is presented to honor the author of an outstanding journal article, published within the last year that shows a clear advancement in communication theory and demonstrates state of the art methodologies.

Qualifications
The article must focus on research and theory within the frameworks of cross-cultural, international, or intercultural communication and must have been published within the year in a refereed (peer-reviewed) journal. The authors are not required to be current members of ICA.

Award
The award recipient will receive a certificate and $200.00 check

Criteria
Nominated papers will be judged by a panel of journal editors and reviewers.
· Contribution to the field of intercultural and international communication.
· Clarity of the article’s purpose
· Logical and smooth organization of the article
· Use and quality of references and citations
· Ability of the article to engage the reader

Submission Procedure
Please send an electronic copy of the article (PDF format is preferred) as an e-mail attachment to Steve Mortenson, IICD Division Chair at rocket@udel.edu.

Include a brief statement as to why the article should be considered for Journal Article Award (you may refer to the evaluation criteria above).

Deadline
Nominations must be received by May 20, 2013.

Contact
Questions regarding the award may be directed to Dr. Steve Mortenson at rocket AT udel.edu.