CFP Transnational Journalism History (Netherlands)

ConferencesCall for Papers: Transnational Journalism History Conference, June 20-21, Groningen, The Netherlands. Deadline:  February 1, 2019.

The fourth annual conference on Transnational Journalism History is seeking papers that study historical transformations in journalism from a transnational perspective, discussing theoretical or methodological issues as well as empirical case studies from all parts of the world. Specifically, we invite contributions that consider:

– the transfer of norms, practices and textual conventions from one country/region to another and their consecutive adaptation in national contexts
– transnational networks of actors
– biographical studies of transnational agents such as journalists or publishers
– the transnational coverage of particular news stories
– transnational audiences
– the impact of (emerging) technologies on transnational journalism
– different media such as television, radio, newspapers or magazines, and the intersection between them

U Leiden Job Ad: International Relations (Netherlands)

Job adsAssistant Professor of International Relations, University of Leiden, The Netherlands. Deadline: 1 March 2018.

The Institute of Political Science of the Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences invites applicants for the position of Assistant Professor of International Relations (3 positions, 1.0 FTE).

Due to growth in our programme, we are looking for candidates who are qualified to teach introductory and advanced courses in international relations at the BSc and MSc levels, including international relations theory, international security, international political economy, international environmental politics, international law, and other topics. Candidates also qualified to teach the politics of policy-making and policy evaluation should indicate this in their application. The institute’s academic staff are all expected to supervise undergraduate and graduate theses, to acquire external research funding, to contribute to the Institute’s research output, and to participate in the intellectual and administrative life of the Institute.

IMPRS Language Sciences Fellowships (Germany)

Call for Applications:
2016 IMPRS for Language Sciences Fellowship positions

The IMPRS for Language Sciences is now advertising three fully funded PhD positions.

The International Max Planck Research School (IMPRS) for Language Sciences is the leading research school in the world devoted to studying the foundations of human language. It is a joint initiative of the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, and the Centre for Language Studies of the Radboud University. The research school offers unrivalled training, top facilities (from genetics labs, advanced brain imaging techniques, psychology labs to supported fieldwork opportunities), and an outstanding interdisciplinary environment.

We aim to attract outstanding students who wish to earn a PhD degree in any area of Languages Sciences. Broad questions addressed by students of the IMPRS include: What is the architecture of the language system? How is language represented in the brain? How does your genome help you speak? What is the genetic basis of neurodevelopmental communication disorders?  Why is the human brain capable of learning and processing diverse languages? If you have a background in Psychology, Linguistics, Genetics, or Neuroscience, you could contribute to fundamental science in this area and earn a PhD degree in the International Max Planck Research School for Language Sciences.

PhD projects are fully funded for four years. PhD students receive a monthly salary sufficient to cover living costs in Nijmegen.

Applicants must have a Master’s degree (or expect to complete the degree before September 2016) in a relevant field. The working language of the research school is English.

Please email your application as one PDF document including the following information:
1. Curriculum vitae. Include:
• Relevant work and educational background
• Details about your Master’s degree, including names of supervisors, (intended) date of completion, title of thesis, a brief description of your topic
• Grades for relevant coursework
• Details about relevant technical or research skills (e.g., programming, statistics, experimental design/methods, molecular biology, neuroimaging, practical phonetics, corpus methods, fieldwork).
2. One page summary of your (completed or ongoing) Master thesis project or equivalent research project (max. 500 words).
3. Identification of potential promotor/supervisor and an explanation why you want to work in her or his domain (max. 200 words).
– See the list of potential promotors in the IMPRS here.
Also look at the (personal/department) websites of these professors.
4. References. Please provide contact details of two academic referees. Non-native speakers of English must also provide a TOEFL/Cambridge/IELTS certificate or equivalent before taking up the post.

Closing date for the applications is January 6 2016.

Skype interviews are planned for the period between 8 and 19 February. Additional life interviews at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics with a final shortlist are planned for the end of February. Start date for the positions is 1 September 2016.

The Max Planck Society is an equal opportunity employer. Applications from women, people with disabilities and under-represented groups are particularly encouraged.

Please send your application and any queries by email with the subject header “IMPRS application”

CFP Groningen Symposium on Language and Social Interaction (Netherlands)

Groningen Symposium on Language and Social Interaction

The second Groningen Symposium on Language and Social Interaction (GSLI) will be organized by the University of Groningen, Center for Language and Cognition on January 22, 2016. The theme of this year’s symposium is ‘Interaction and Health Care’. The symposium aims to bring together scholars interested in interaction in health care settings between clients and health care professionals. The symposium aims to cover a wide range of different health care settings ( e.g. consultations between general practitioners and patients, therapeutic interactions, clinic visits, etc.). The common ground is that all contributions focus on the ways health care professionals and clients collaboratively shape and organize their medical activities and tasks through interaction.

GSLI is glad to announce that Ruth Parry (University of Nottingham) has accepted our invitation as keynote speaker of the Symposium.

Registration and abstract submission open: July 6, 2015
Deadline for abstracts: September 7, 2015
Notification of acceptance: November 2, 2015
Deadline for registration: December 7, 2015
Symposium: January 22, 2016

CFP Things to remember conference

Things to Remember: Materializing Memories in Art and Culture
International Conference, Radboud University, Nijmegen (The Netherlands)
June 5-6, 2014

CALL FOR PAPERS

Confirmed Keynote Speakers
Dr Dylan Trigg, University College Dublin
Dr. Celeste Olalquiaga, independent scholar

Call for Papers:
Memory matters. It matters because memory brings the past into the present, and opens it up to the future. But it also matters literally, because memory is mediated materially. Materiality is the stuff of memory. Meaningful objects that we love (or hate) function not only as aide-mémoire but as memory itself.

The international conference Things to Remember: Materializing Memories in Art and Culture aims to explore a sustained focus on the materiality in and of memory. Such a focus helps to understand memory as a vibrant process, by analysing the active, creative and popular forms of remembering and forgetting. At the same time a materialist focus entails recognising certain forms of agency in material objects. As Bill Brown argues, a culture constitutes itself through its inanimate objects: ‘culture as it is objectified in material forms’. In this conference we want to draw cultural memory into the discourse of ‘new materialism’, inquiring how we remember with and through things. Here we avoid simple dualisms by foregrounding the intersections between the material and immaterial, natural and cultural, living or inert. Things make us remember (and forget), yet we also use things to bring about remembrance or forgetfulness. We therefore argue that memory is both mental and material.

The conference foregrounds the materiality of memory by investigating the vital relations between past and present, absence and presence, and remembrance and object. We thus interrogate the material transfers through which cultural memories of the past are expressed and circulated in art, media and popular culture. These transfers produce, re-present and transform mediated memories, literally giving shape to them in words, images, and objects. The conference pays as much attention to how we remember, create and re-create memories as to what we remember.

Cultural memory is taken as both an active process and a dynamic practice. In such processes and practices of remembering, objects and things are endowed with meaning, agency and affect. As Bergson put it poetically, recollection is like ‘a fold in a material’. This raises the question how cultural memory plays a role in the social and cultural life of objects. Or, vice versa, what is the role that material things and objects play in ‘doing’ memory? That role will entail a study of the interaction between the materiality of memory, its affective nature, and its ideological frameworks. The conference will explore how memory unfolds time in its objectified materializations, both looking forwards and backwards, and realizing the affective dimensions of the here and now.

This conference will be centred on the following questions: What kind of memory-work do objects do? How does materiality mediate memory, for the individual and for society? What is the role of memory and forgetting in the social and cultural life of objects? Or vice versa, what is the role that material things and objects play in constructing memories? How do art objects and practices bring the past in the present? And how do they open up possibilities for a different future? How is the object endowed with meaning, affect and agency through the recollections attached to it?

We are particularly interested in: analyses of what is at stake in the complex processes of remembering and forgetting, of recollecting and disremembering, of amnesia and anamnesis that make up cultural memory; studies of how memory, object and affect are contingent on one another in their relation to time, both looking forwards and backwards; and explorations of how art, media and popular culture, in producing material memories, may produce a relevant experience for the spectator, visitor, listener or reader.

The conference aims at covering a wide range of artistic disciplines: fine arts, architecture, literature, music, cinema, theatre, digital media and fashion. We welcome proposals for papers as well as for three-paper panels.

Possible topics can include but are not limited to:
Thing-memory
Art as a memory trigger
Literary and artistic interventions in cultural forgetting
Consumer culture as planned obsolescence
The consumption of the past in contemporary fashion
Remembering forgotten writers and artists
The production of presence and absence
The persistence of the historical past
Theories of matter, thing, and object
Trauma and materiality
Discarded and recycled objects
Souvenirs, gifts, kitsch objects
Toys, models, and miniature objects as things of memory
Ruins and material remains of the past
The internet of things as a technology of memory
The preservation, conservation and presentation of (in)tangible cultural heritage
Virtual ‘matter’: The presence (and absence) of the material in digital art and media
Embodied / (multi)sensory / kinesthetic memory
The musealization and monumentalization of the past through material objects

Our previous successful conferences resulted in two book publications:
Technologies of Memory in the Arts, edited by L. Plate & A. Smelik
(Palgrave/Macmillan, 2009).
Performing Memory in Art and Popular Culture, edited by L. Plate & A.
Smelik (Routledge, 2013).

Deadline for paper proposals: January 7, 2014

Please submit your proposal for a 20-minute paper; or for a panel session of three papers through the conference website.

Conference committee:
Marguérite Corporaal, Vincent Meelberg, László Munteán, Liedeke Plate, Anneke Smelik, Lianne Toussaint, Wouter Weijers

Contact information:
thingstoremember@let.ru.nl

VIEW open access e-journal

The number of peer-reviewed, open access electronic journals is increasing, helping to share knowledge across national boundaries. The newest is View, which, given their focus on visual content, is multi-media as well. Their editorial policy states: “This journal provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge.” I could not agree more. Information about the current issue follows.

EUscreenXL presents issue 3 of VIEW, the Journal of European Television History and Culture: European Television Memories

VIEW, the Journal of European Television History and Culture is the first peer-reviewed, multi-media and open access e-journal in the field of European television history and culture. It offers an international platform for outstanding academic research and archival reflection on television as an important part of our European cultural heritage. The journal is proud to present its third issue: European Television Memories. It has been guest-edited by Jérôme Bourdon and Berber Hagedoorn and is freely available.

In the context of the fast development of media studies, the third issue of VIEW highlights debates around the moving borders of national memories, fostered by television in the context of European history. The articles in this issue focus on the contribution of European television researchers, covering all three areas of media studies: production, text and reception.

Table of Contents

Editorial – Jérôme Bourdon,  Berber Hagedoorn

DISCOVERIES

– ‘Remembering Our First TV Set’. Personal Memories as a Source for Television Audience History – Cecilia Penati
– “It’s just so hard to bring it to mind”: The Significance of ‘Wallpaper’ in the Gendering of Television Memory Work – Hazel Collie
– Martin Luther in Primetime. Television Fiction and Cultural Memory Construction in Cold War Germany – Stewart Anderson
– The Production of Czechoslovakia´s Most Popular Television Serial ‘The Hospital on the Outskirts’ and its Post-1989 Repeats – Petr Bednařík
– Parallel Stories, Differentiated Histories. Exploring Fiction and Memory in Spanish and Portuguese Television – José Carlos Rueda Laffond, Carlota Coronado Ruiz, Catarina Duff Burnay, Susana Díaz Pérez, Amparo Guerra Gómez, Rogério Santos
– Looking for What You Are Looking for: A Media Researcher’s First Search in a Television Archive – Jasmijn Van Gorp

EXPLORATIONS

– Television as a Hybrid Repertoire of Memory. New Dynamic Practices of Cultural Memory in the Multi-Platform Era – Berber Hagedoorn
– Why Should We Study Socialist Commercials? – Anikó Imre
– Window to the West: Memories of Watching Finnish Television in Estonia During the Soviet Period – Annika Lepp, Mervi Pantti
– The Life and Afterlife of a Socialist Media Friend. On the Longterm Cultural Relevance of the Polish TV Series ‘Czterdziestolatek’ – Kinga S. Bloch
– Chronology and Ideology. Temporal Structuring in Israeli Historical Documentary Series – Bosmat Garami
– Great Escapes from the Past. Memory and Identity in European Transnational Television News – Andreas Widholm
– Memory, Television and the Making of the BBC’s ‘The Story of Wales’ – Steve Blandford, Ruth McElroy

VIEW is published by the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision in collaboration with Utrecht University, Maastricht University and Royal Holloway University of London. It is supported by the EUscreenXL project, the European Television History Network and the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research.

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Wageningen University-Intercultural Dialogue in practice

“At Wageningen UR [The Netherlands] the number of foreign students and foreign staff is ever increasing. The university is populated by a richly varied group of people from diverse cultures, which makes studying, working and living exciting but not always easy. It requires trust and respect to meet ‘the other’ and everyone’s recognition that he or she is ‘the other’ too. Dialogue is needed for a constructive process of studying, working and living in an intercultural environment and in order to benefit together from the challenges and chances diversity offers.

For that reason, the Executive Board set up the Intercultural Dialogue Team at the beginning of 2008. The group has been tasked with providing advise – solicited or unsolicited – on intercultural issues in the context of ‘internationalisation at home’. Both staff and students participate in the team. Intercultural dialogue is defined as a process that promotes an open and respectful interaction between individuals and groups from different cultural backgrounds. The Team is busy developing plans to create the conditions for intercultural dialogue and suggest solutions for problems that may occur.

The team is one of the instruments by which the Executive Board is seeking to emphasise the importance of cultural diversity in Wageningen. At the same time it provides a vehicle by which to highlight ‘good practices’ and recognise problems with cultural diversity in the workplace.
It includes representatives from all walks of university life – including students, lecturers, policy-makers and facilitators and has formulated the several priorities:
*Welcoming of foreign students and staff, cultural introduction to Europe and the Netherlands
*Education in intercultural groups
*Week of Intercultural Dialogue
*Opening a hotline during the week of Intercultural Dialogue
*Making an inventory of links between various campus initiatives”
(For more information)