Lisa Childress: Increasing Faculty Engagement in ICC & Internationalization on Campus

Guest Posts

Increasing Faculty Engagement in Intercultural Communication and Internationalization on Campus by Lisa K. Childress.

How can faculty members promote intercultural dialogue on campus? That is what those of us who are advocates for intercultural communication (ICC) and internationalization seek to encourage on a daily basis. Many faculty members on campus may already see interdisciplinary dialogue as an avenue through which to gain a more holistic understanding of their subject matter. In other words, many of our colleagues already believe in the value of looking at research and teaching through more than one disciplinary lens as a way to provide a more complex, comprehensive point of view. The question thus becomes: How can we use the already held value of interdisciplinarity as a springboard to promote the value of ICC and internationalization?

Let’s look at this conundrum through a series of questions:

As faculty members, we seek to develop our students’ global competencies.

(1) What is the foundation for developing our students’ global competencies?
Answer: The internationalization of our curricula.

(2) What is at the heart of internationalizing our curricula?
Answer: Our faculty.

(3) With what do faculty primarily concern themselves?
Answer: Their department’s goals and values and their individual teaching and research agendas.

(4) How can we shift our university’s academic departments towards a more intercultural and international focus?
Answer: Customizing ICC and internationalization to unique disciplinary priorities.

So, how can we move the ball forward? Since faculty members live within their academic disciplines, that is where the conversations and the impetus for increasing faculty engagement in ICC and internationalization need to begin.

Read the full discussion in order to learn the next steps.

Lisa K. Childress Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesLisa K. Childress is a global education consultant, working with universities to engage faculty in international teaching, research, and service.

Dr. Childress previously worked at the University of Virginia’s Darden Graduate School of Business as the international career consultant, where she taught cross-cultural training seminars for faculty and MBA students, co-chaired the Dean’s International Advisory Board, taught a professional development course, and counseled domestic students on their job search overseas and international students on their job search in the U.S. Dr. Childress also served as Duke University School of Law’s director of special international projects, where she created programs to build bridges between international and U.S. students and developed Duke Law programs overseas, such as the Asia-American Institute of Transnational Law in Kyushu, Japan. Dr. Childress holds degrees from the University of Virginia, Harvard University, and George Washington University.

Selected publications:

Childress, L.K. (2018). The twenty-first century university: Developing faculty engagement in internationalization (2nd ed.). New York: Peter Lang.

Childress, L. K. (2017). The role of academic departments in promoting faculty engagement in internationalisation. Internationalisation of Higher Education, 1, 15-34.

Childress, L. K. (2012). The faculty role in internationalizing the curriculum: Findings from a cross-case study. In D. K. Deardorff, H. de Wit, & T. Adams (Eds.), The Sage handbook of international higher education (pp. 257-259). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Childress, L. K. (2010). Interdisciplinarity: A catalyst for faculty engagement win internationalizationJournal of Global Initiatives: Policy, Pedagogy, Perspective4(1), Article 5.

Childress, L. K. (2009). Internationalization plans for higher education institutions. Journal of studies in international education13(3), 289-309.

Childress, L. K. (2009). Planning for internationalization by investing in faculty. Journal of International & Global Studies1(1), 30-49.

Stellenbosch U Job Ad: Global Partnerships & Internationalisation (S Africa)

Job adsManager of Global Partnerships and Internationalisation Support, Stellenbosch University, South Africa. Deadline: 9 November 2018.

  • Develops and implements policy and strategy for the internationalisation of Stellenbosch University (SU) and the core activities: research, learning and teaching and social impact;

  • Develops sustainable significant bilateral and multi-lateral alliances, partnerships and collaboration in support of academic projects;

  • Creates a dedicated support service platform to promote SU’s global engagement activities on campus, in the local community, within the region and continent and beyond;

  • Facilitates the development of scholarship in Africa in collaboration with other centers at SU International.

Internationalizing the Communication Discipline

Resources in ICD“ width=After several years of task forces on internationalizing communication, and a special issue of Spectra entitled The Communication Discipline Goes Global, the National Communication Association has now produced a brochure entitled Internationalizing the Communication Discipline. It likely will be useful primarily for those already convinced of the need, who want help in convincing colleagues and administrators.

A related prior resource available on the NCA website is a set of pages describing internationalization, which I prepared for them in 2011. All of the photos provided then have been removed or replaced, and the content has been revised to include specific recommendations from the 2013 task force on internationalization, on which I served. Here’s the introduction, explaining the topic, goals, and audience:

“Internationalization is about taking the rest of the world seriously, not only one’s home country, and can be thought of as the formal term for thinking globally before acting locally. It requires knowing enough about the larger world to act appropriately in a specific context and location, especially when interacting with cultural others. Internationalization is relevant for citizens of all countries, but the following comments are primarily intended for those based in the United States, where internationalization is still often viewed as an option. Internationalization applies to all domains and contexts, but these comments emphasize higher education.”

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

CFP Affiliate Journal Initiative by ICA

New Affiliate Journal Initiative Developed for International Communication Association (ICA)
by Cynthia Stohl, Immediate Past President, University of California – Santa Barbara
(from ICA Newsletter for May 2014)

ICA has just announced the inaugural call for applications for ICA Affiliate Journal status. In January, 2014 the ICA Board established a new journal category, “Affiliate Journal.” An affiliate journal is published independently of ICA, in a language other than English, and meets or exceeds the general standards of an ICA journal and the specific standards developed for affiliate journals. Once approved by the ICA board, the affiliate journal will carry the ICA imprimatur and will be designated as such on the ICA website. An affiliate journal will be available to ICA members on line for free or at a discount.

The procedures and guidelines for this Affiliate Journal initiative will be operative for a trial period of three years. A maximum of two journals will be selected for this initial phase. For the first 2 years journal editors of the affiliate journals will provide the ICA Board with an annual report submitted one month before the annual meeting. During the third year a comprehensive formal review will be conducted by a specially appointed affiliate journal evaluation committee comprised of members of ICA’s Executive Committee and at least one appointed member from both the ICA board and the publication Committee. At that time the entire program will be evaluated, long term procedures for continued assessment and evaluation will be established, and decisions will be made regarding continuing affiliate status for the journal.

Rationale
The Affiliate Journal initiative serves several of the internationalization goals articulated by the EC and the ICA Board. Affiliate journals build bridges with the international communication community, connect our membership with research published in non- English high quality journals, help publicize the finest communication research done throughout the world, and give our members access to new and diverse audiences.

To be accepted as an affiliate journal, the editorial management must agree to publish extended abstracts of each article in every issue in English. Other efforts to share research not typically published in English are encouraged. An affiliate journal might for example, invite English language reviews of literature of research in a particular area that has not been readily accessible to most members of ICA. Efforts to enable ICA members to share their work with colleagues working in other languages are also highly desirable. Affiliate journals may, for example, publish interviews (both in English and the official language of the journal) with scholars who typically publish in a language other than the official language of the journal. On line or in print for free or at a discount, English language extended abstracts will be available for free online.

Application Procedures
Criteria for selection and the application form can be found here. If you have any questions please contact Cynthia Stohl, Chair, Affiliate Journal Committee at  or Michael Haley, ICA Executive Director.

Int’l scholars wanted: Society for History of Technology

Call for Nominations for International Scholars
Society for the History of Technology (SHOT), 2014

Each year the Society for the History of Technology designates up to four International Scholars for a two-year term. One of the goals of the International Scholars program is to foster an international network of scholars in the history of technology that will benefit all members of the Society. We particularly welcome applications from or nominations of scholars from Africa, Asia and Latin America. Graduate students, post-docs, and visiting scholars who are living and working in North America are not eligible to become International Scholars; however, they are eligible to apply once they return to their home countries.

Benefits and Support
International Scholars shall receive regular SHOT membership at no cost during their two-year term. At each annual meeting, SHOT will host a special gathering to welcome current International Scholars, introduce them to SHOT officers, and discuss with them SHOT’s international outreach and the international intellectual dimensions of our field.

International Scholars will participate in an email discussion list of all current International Scholars and the Internationalization Committee. Through the list International Scholars can seek support in writing paper abstracts for SHOT’s annual meeting and other activities in their task as ambassadors for the Society.

Conditions
As a condition of appointment, SHOT requires International Scholars to submit at least one paper proposal for SHOT’s annual meeting during their two-year term. While paper proposals from International Scholars will not automatically be accepted for the annual meeting, SHOT encourages the program committee to give these proposals special consideration.

SHOT also requires International Scholars to submit a travel grant application for each of the two SHOT annual meetings during the two years of their appointment. International Scholars receive highest priority for SHOT funding. Travel grant funds will help pay for travel expenses for International Scholars to attend the annual meeting and for basic conference registration, although not for lodging. For more information, please check the SHOT Travel Grant information page, available by link from either the SHOT annual meeting web page or the SHOT awards web page.

To inform the SHOT community about the state and developments of the history of technology in their regions, progress in disseminating information about the Society and stimulating scholarly activities in the history of technology, International Scholars commit themselves to at least one publication in the SHOT Newsletter or on the SHOT website.

Application
To nominate yourself or someone else as an International Scholar, please send a letter and a brief curriculum vitae to EACH member of the Internationalization Committee and to SHOT Secretary David Lucsko (shotsec [at] auburn [dot] edu). In the letter, please describe your goals in becoming a SHOT International Scholar, address the current state of history of technology in your home country and home institution, state how your position as a SHOT International Scholar will benefit the study of history of technology in your home country, and suggest what insights your research can bring to the SHOT community The deadline of 2014 nominations is April 15. New candidates will be selected and announced by the beginning of June. For more information about the application procedures, please visit our website.

2014 SHOT Internationalization Committee
Itty Abraham           (seaai [at] nus [dot] edu [dot] sg)
Sulfikar Amir           (SULFIKAR [at] ntu [dot] edu [dot] sg)
Francesca Bray     (francesca.bray [at] ed [dot] ac [dot] uk)
Yulia Frumer           (yfrumer [at] jhu [dot] edu)
Adam Lucas           (alucas [at] uow [dot] edu [dot] au)
Honghong Tinn       (hhtinn [at] gmail [dot] com)

Miike reflection on international/cultural communication

On Inheriting the Fields of International and Intercultural Communication: A Personal Reflection*
Yoshitaka Miike (University of Hawai‘i at Hilo)

To inherit is to receive as legacy, place adequate value on and make a part of one’s life. But to be a custodian of a great legacy is to guard, preserve, expand and promote it. It is to honor it by building on and expanding it and, in turn, leaving it as an enriched legacy for future generations.

Maulana Karenga (1996, p. 551)

The International and Intercultural Communication Division (IICD) of the National Communication Association (NCA) was founded as a commission in 1971 and later formed as a division in 1984. I am thus the 42nd incoming chair of this flourishing division. When I think about the history of the IICD and its critical role in advocating diversity and advancing internationalization within the NCA, I feel the heavy weight of the gavel that Dr. S. Lily Mendoza at Oakland University passed to me in Washington, D.C. With an eye on the 100th Anniversary of the NCA next year, I would like to offer a personal year-end reflection on how we may inherit the fields of international and intercultural communication. More specifically, I wish to suggest that we (1) “create a community of a larger memory” of our fields (to borrow Dr. Ronald Takaki’s [1998] words), (2) clarify our theoretical ideas  and practical issues without sacrificing their complexities, and (3) generate knowledge that bridges differences especially from non-U.S. and non-elite perspectives.

*Source: Miike, Y. (2013, December). On Inheriting the Fields of International and Intercultural Communication: A Personal Reflection. National Communication Association’s International and Intercultural Communication Division Newsletter, pp. 4-7.

Internationalizing Postgraduate Studies

International Communication Association newsletter
Student Column: Internationalizing Postgraduate Studies
Anne Kaun, ICA Student Board Member, Sodertorn U/ U of Pennsylvania

ICA

The current issue of the ICA Newsletter includes a student column on internationalizing postgraduate studies. It begins:

“Internationalization has long been an important issue for the ICA. Although the name indicates that the association is per se international, this has not been a given fact on different levels (e.g. awards, fellowships) and internationalization remains one of the priorities for the ICA as the current presidential candidates Amy Jordan and Sharon Strover stress. That an international association should be truly international is out of question, but how international do PhD candidates have to be? And what does internationalization of PhD studies actually mean in different contexts?

I have asked a PhD-student and two postdoc scholars about what it means to be international from their perspective. The three following statements derive from three very different contexts, namely USA, China and Sweden, and are giving some inside into what internationalization of post-graduate studies might be.”

Go to the original column to read the statements.