War and Media Network CFP: Colonialism, War & Photography (London)

As part of the research project: Cultural Exchange in Times of Global Conflict: Colonials, Neutrals and Belligerents during the First World War.

Colonialism, War & Photography
London – 17 September 2015

If the First World War is usually defined as the military clash of empires, it can also be reconceptualised as a turning point in the history of cultural encounters. Between 1914 and 1918, more than four million non-white men were drafted mostly as soldiers or labourers into the Allied armies: they served in different parts of the world – from Europe and Africa to Mesopotamia, the Middle East and China – resulting in an unprecedented range of cultural encounters. The war was also a turning point in the history of photographic documentation as such moments and processes were recorded in hundreds of thousands of photographs by fellow soldiers, official photographers, amateurs, civilians and the press. In the absence of written records, these photographs are some of our most important – and hitherto largely neglected – sources of the lives of these men: in trenches, fields, billets, hospitals, towns, markets, POW camps. But how do we ‘read’ these photographs?

Using the First World War as a focal point, this interdisciplinary one-day workshop aims to examine the complex intersections between war, colonialism and photography. What is the use and influence of (colonial) photography on the practice of history? What is the relationship between its formal and historical aspects? How are the photographs themselves involved in the processes of cultural contact that they record and how do they negotiate structures of power?

This workshop aims to explore the multiple histories and intensities of meaning that cluster around war, colonialism and photography. Organised under the auspices of the HERA-funded research project Cultural Exchange in the Time of Global Conflict: Colonials, Neutrals and Belligerents during the First World War’, the conference seeks to bring scholars interested in the topic from different disciplines, including visual culture, sociology, geography, anthropology, colonial and military history, cultural and literary studies. We would like to invite papers on, but not limited to, the following themes:
• Photography and the spaces of war (esp. in Africa and the Middle East)
• Photographing ‘the other’
• Photography and imperial war propaganda (in belligerent and neutral countries)
• Science, anthropology and photography
• Soldiers as photographers and collectors
• Photography and the colonial archive

While the historical focus of the workshop is the First World War, we would also be interested in papers concerned with photographic representations of colonial violence in the late 19th and early 20th century as well as theoretical investigations of the subject. Proposals from scholars at any stage in their career are welcome.

Keynote & Discussant: Prof Elizabeth Edwards, Director, Photographic History Research Centre, De Montfort University

Convenors: Dr Santanu Das & Dr Daniel Steinbach, King’s College London

Participants should send abstracts of up to 300 words for a 20-25 minute paper, a short biography, and any enquiries to Daniel Steinbach by 31 July 2015

Mapping Cultural Diversity

London is one of the most linguistically diverse cities in the world. Almost two million people speak English as a second language, and across the city, Londoners speak about 300 different languages. A new map shows how those languages show up as you travel along local subway lines.

The map was created by Oliver O’Brien, a researcher at University College London, using new census data. It shows which language is most common after English at each station, with bigger circles for the most popular languages. It’s drawn using the same simple graphic style as the standard subway map.

Adapted from the original article:
Peters, Adele. (2014, December 17). This map shows which languages are most common at every subway stop In London. Co.Exist.

Save

Sara Mills Profile

Profiles

Sara Mills is a Research Professor in Linguistics at Sheffield Hallam University in the UK.

Sara Mills

 

She has published on feminist linguistics, mainly sexism and gender and politeness. Her recent research has specifically focused on politeness, and she is also interested in how groups communicate on social media, languages, and perceptions of “management-speak.”


Work for CID:
Sara Mills wrote KC46: Politeness.

CFP Conf on knowledge, culture and change in organizations

14th Int’l Conference on Knowledge, Culture and Change in Organizations
Saïd Business School, University of Oxford
Oxford, United Kingdom
4-5 August 2014

Submit a Proposal

Conference Focus
The primary interest of the Management Conference is knowledge-based social and economic change. Driven by globalisation and advances in information and communications technologies, this change has been characterised in terms of emerging information/knowledge societies and a global knowledge-based economy.

The conference will offer a comprehensive overview of current thinking in the area broadly described as knowledge management. Its perspectives will range from big picture analyses in keynote addresses by internationally recognised experts in the field of management, to detailed case studies of management practice. It will traverse a broad terrain, from theory and analysis to practical strategies for action.

We are inviting proposals for paper presentations, workshops/interactive sessions, posters/exhibits, or colloquia (See Proposal Types). For more information about the ideas and themes underlying this community, see Our Focus. Proposal ideas that extend beyond these thematic areas will also be considered.

Virtual participation is available for those who are unable to attend the conference in person. Proposals for virtual presentations may be submitted at any time, up to the start of the conference. All conference registrants (in-person and virtual) may also submit their written papers for publication in one of the family of journals that supports this knowledge community.

Submit a Conference Proposal
To learn more about preparing and submitting your conference proposal, including guidelines, deadlines, and “how-to” information, go to Submitting Your Work: Conference Presentations.

Conference Details
To learn more about the conference, including speakers, session formats, venue, registration, and the like, stay in The Conference section of the website and use the navigation bar on the left to access desired information.

Music Tourism and Travel

CALL FOR PAPERS

Soundtracks: Music, Tourism and Travel
Liverpool, United Kingdom
6-9 July 2012

As an expression of culture, a form of intangible heritage, a signifier of place, and a marker of moments, music provides an important and emotive narrative for tourists. Indeed, it is increasingly difficult to imagine tourism ‘in silence’, outside of the scores and songs which accompany and punctuate journeys. From touristic performances of traditional dance, pilgrimages to the homes and graves of composers and singers, impromptu street entertainments, tours to concerts, attending festivals, to the sounds of the car radio, the travelling with ipods and the ‘muzak’ of hotel lifts, music can both activate and shape the journey, and passively permeate its duration. Music can both define and transcend the borders of destinations, emphasise and challenge notions of tradition, provide opportunities for liminal play, transgression and resistance and, help define the identities of visitors and the visited.

In this, the CTCC’s 6th international research conference, and in the City of Liverpool famed for its popular music, we seek to explore the relationships between tourism, tourists and all forms/genres and sub-genres of music including: popular, classical, folk, dance, rock, jazz and hip-hop, across all cultures and continents. In the context of new and old global mobilities, we are interested in musical pilgrimage, the material and social flows of travellers and musicians, the cultural and economic policies that promote music tourism, festivals and performances for tourists, ethnographies of touristic encounters with music, the place of music in the representation of tourism destinations and, the role of music in the construction of tourist discourses, narratives and memories. As in previous events, the conference aims to provide critical dialogue beyond disciplinary boundaries and epistemologies and thus we welcome papers from the widest range of disciplines and fields including: anthropology, cultural geography, cultural studies, ethnology and folklore, history, heritage studies, landscape studies, leisure studies, museum studies, musicology and ethnomusicology, philosophy, political sciences, sociology, subaltern studies, tourism studies and urban/spatial planning.

We welcome innovative perspectives on all aspects of music and tourism. Key themes of interest to the conference include:
Musical memory – the role of music in narratives of touristic experience
Fans, pilgrimage and performances – motivations, behaviours and meanings
The tourist’s involvement in preserving and creating musical traditions
Managing tourists at musical sites
Musical imaginaries – representing places, peoples and pasts in music
Dance tourism and embodied practices
Designing ambience – mobilising music in touristic spaces
Music festivals as opportunities for tourist encounters
Inspirations – travelling musicians
Music as intangible heritage – touring through traditions
Challenging musical traditions – tourist ‘noise’
Please submit a 300 word abstract including title and full contact details as an electronic file to ctcc@leedsmet.ac.uk. You may submit your abstract as soon as possible but no later than November 21st 2011.

For further details on the conference please contact us at Email ctcc@leedsmet.ac.uk or Tel. +44 (0) 113 812 8541.

Online dialogue: UK and Arab world

“We are looking for a motivated group of 13 young people from across the UK, to participate in an exciting new joint project between the British Youth Council and the British Council’s Global Changemakers Middle East and North Africa (MENA) programme, where we are giving you the chance to join other young people from the MENA region in a series of online digital dialogues exploring in depth common issues such as identity, education, health, climate change and more. 

If this sounds like something you are interested in why not apply!
Criteria
You must be…
● Aged between 17 and 25 and resident in the UK.
● Motivated and willing to learn and overcome new challenges.
● Able to commit for 6 months until June 2011.
● Have regular internet access
● Available for an hour a week to check the online Facebook group for updates and to answer any questions posted by other members of the community (this may be more during weeks of dialogue) and to read some resources to prepare you for the dialogue.
As a participant we will give you the opportunity to…
● Develop relationships & explore common issues with young people from the MENA region.
● Get training in facilitation skills and intercultural dialogue.
● Be supported to develop a community action project in partnership with young people from the MENA region.
● Possibly have the chance to attend a Global Changemakers meeting representing young people in the UK.”
For further information, and an application form, see the original posting.
%d bloggers like this: