CID Poster #5: Communication as Culture Definition

This is the next of the posters designed by Linda J. de Wit, in her role as CID intern. The painting is Winter Landscape with Ice Skaters, by Dutch painter Hendrick Avercamp, painted around 1608. It is on display in the Dutch national museum Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, which has made many of its paintings available online in high resolution and copyright free. The painting illustrates the quote not only because it shows social interaction, but also because ice skating is considered a typical example of Dutch culture (and recently has officially been named part of Dutch cultural heritage). The silhouettes are designs from vecteezy.com. The source of the quote is cited at the bottom of the poster.

Just in case anyone wants to cite this poster, the following would be the recommended format:

Center for Intercultural Dialogue. (2017). Communication as culture definition. CID Posters, 5. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/07/communication.png

As with other series, if you wish to contribute an original contribution, please send an email before starting any work to receive approval, to minimize inadvertent duplication, and to learn about technical requirements. As is the case with other CID Publications, posters should be created initially in English. Given that translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue have received so many views, anyone who wishes to translate their own poster into another language (or two) is invited to provide that as well. If you want to volunteer to translate someone else’s poster into a language in which you are fluent, send in a note before starting, to receive approval and to confirm no one else is working on the same one.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

CID Poster #4: Types of Cultural Communication

CID PostersThis is the next of the posters designed by Linda J. de Wit, in her role as CID intern. The need for clarification between intercultural/ intracultural/ cross-cultural/ international forms of communication has been made obvious by the number of times I’ve been asked to explain the differences. These terms have been discussed at length in many publications; one relevant source is cited on the poster itself. The idea to use fruit for the visual explanation of the different terms was Linda’s, and came from proverbs: in English, one is told not to compare apples and oranges; in many other languages, the fruits referred to are apples and pears. The poster thus implicitly refers to the relativist idea that cultures shouldn’t be judged in comparison to others.

Types of Cultural Communication
Just in case anyone wants to cite this poster, the following would be the recommended format:

Center for Intercultural Dialogue. (2017). Types of cultural communication. CID Posters, 4. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/07/fruit.png

As with other series, if you wish to contribute an original contribution, please send an email before starting any work to receive approval, to minimize inadvertent duplication, and to learn about technical requirements. As is the case with other CID Publications, posters should be created initially in English. Given that translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue have received so many views, anyone who wishes to translate their own poster into another language (or two) is invited to provide that as well. If you want to volunteer to translate someone else’s poster into a language in which you are fluent, send in a note before starting, to receive approval and to confirm no one else is working on the same one.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

CID Poster #3: Intercultural Dialogue

CID PostersThis is the third of the posters designed by Linda J. de Wit, in her role as CID intern. The quote by Peter Praxmarer does not come from a publication, but from a Skype conversation we had on April 25, 2017. I was struck by what he said, and how nicely it summed up the concept of intercultural dialogue, and requested permission to turn the definition into a poster, and he graciously agreed. In terms of visual design, Linda indicated “art” by the picture frame, and “science” by the design in the background. Hopefully this definition will find a wide audience, because I think it does a better and more concise job of explaining intercultural dialogue than other definitions I’ve seen.

Intercultural Dialogue definition

Just in case anyone wants to cite this poster, the following would be the recommended format:

Center for Intercultural Dialogue. (2017). Intercultural Dialogue. CID Posters, 3. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/07/art-and-science.png

As with other series, if you wish to contribute an original contribution, please send an email before starting any work to receive approval, to minimize inadvertent duplication, and to learn about technical requirements. As is the case with other CID Publications, posters should be created initially in English. Given that translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue have received so many views, anyone who wishes to translate their own poster into another language (or two) is invited to provide that as well. If you want to volunteer to translate someone else’s poster into a language in which you are fluent, send in a note before starting, to receive approval and to confirm no one else is working on the same one.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue AT gmail.com


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concept #28: Postcolonialism Translated into Dutch

Key Concepts in ICDToday I am posting KC#28: Postcolonialism, originally prepared by Raka Shome for publication in English in 2014, and which Linda J. de Wit has now translated into Dutch. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC28 Postcolonialism_DutchShome, R. (2017). Postkolonialisme. (L. J. de Wit, Trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 28. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/07/kc28-postcolonialism_dutch.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concepts #1: Intercultural Dialogue Translated into Dutch

Key Concepts in ICDToday I am posting KC#1: Intercultural Dialogue, which I wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Linda J. de Wit has now translated into Dutch. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC1 ICD_DutchLeeds-Hurwitz, W. (2017). Interculturele dialoog. (L. J. de Wit, Trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 1. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/kc1-icd_dutch.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

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Amritsar: Conflict & Harmony

Applied ICDAmritsar: Conflict and Harmony
Guest Post by Linda J. de Wit

Amritsar is a medium-sized city in India serving as a tourist destination for two main reasons. First, it is the location of the holiest temple of the Sikh religion; second, it is the closest city to the Wagah border crossing with Pakistan where thousands of visitors assemble to watch the ceremonial closing of the gates every day.

The city and its surroundings have great significance in the history of Partition and the border ceremony is probably the most tangible example of the persistent tensions between the countries separated in 1947. In a remarkably aligned military drill, soldiers on both sides parade up and down, accompanied by hostile looks, aggressive hand gestures, and kicks so high they are basically standing splits. The audiences cheer every move in what almost looks like a dance-off.

When the two flags simultaneously are lowered, a single brief handshake takes place before the border gates are violently slammed shut in the neighbor’s face. The crowds applaud and shout patriotic slogans. The ceremony is a joyful event with music and dancing, having the atmosphere of a sports game. The souvenirs on the Indian side signal that the subject matter is more serious, as they boast about the “world’s largest border guarding force.” Most visitors have probably never been, and will never go, to the other side.

Back in the city, one can visit the Partition museum, the only one in the country. It recounts how the division of British India along religious lines caused millions of people to leave their homes. Amritsar’s train station saw refugees leaving in both directions, as well as packed trains arriving with no one alive, attacked because they were Muslims or Hindus.

A stone’s throw from the museum is a walled garden, Jallianwala Bagh, where a massacre took place by British forces among peaceful protesters in 1919. Gatherings had been forbidden and, without providing a warning, soldiers opened fire on the crowd for ten minutes, killing hundreds. This was one of the events that nourished the independence movement in India.

The city’s main attraction, however, is a different place, drawing more visitors than the Taj Mahal: the Golden Temple. It is the spiritual center of Sikhism because it is where the original version of the religion’s holy book lies. The Temple’s four doors symbolize that people from east, west, north and south can enter the place, irrespective of caste, creed and sex: Sikhism’s fundamental values include absolute equality and the unity of humankind.

The free information booklets distributed around the Temple describe how Sikhism holds that, in essence, all religions are an expression of the same fundamental truth. The founder of Sikhism, Guru Nanak (1469-1539), strove to bring Hindus and Muslims together: “his life and teachings were a symbol of the harmony between the two communities.”[1]

The peaceful ambience of the Temple complex is a heartening change from the city’s gloomier connotations. Tears may spring to the visitor’s eyes, due to mountains of onions being peeled by countless volunteers: every Sikh place of worship has a common kitchen distributing free meals. At the Golden Temple some 75,000 people per day share the same food, sitting together in a row on the floor.

For the moment, such harmony is, on a larger scale, still something to strive for. Last December, the Heart of Asia peace summit took place in Amritsar, but India and Pakistan did not successfully initiate a dialogue process.[2]

The significance of Amritsar in history, as in the present, remains ambiguous. The city is the backdrop of some of the most intense examples of failing intercultural and interreligious dialogue and the consequences thereof. At the same time, as the capital of Sikhism, the city is imbued with the inclusive philosophy of tolerance and unity. For all its contrasts, Amritsar ultimately is a symbol of hope of a better future.

[1] Dr. Sir Radhkrishnan, as cited in: Singh Shan, H. (2015). Sri Guru Granth Sahib. The Unique and Universal Scripture. Dharam Parchar Committee.

[2] http://www.atimes.com/inod-pak-dialogue-process-fails-launch-amritsar/

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Request: Indian Teachers in the Persian Gulf

Linda J. de Wit is a master’s student in Global Studies and an intern for the Center for Intercultural Dialogue. She is currently preparing her research for her master’s thesis, which will look at how Indian teachers working in the Persian Gulf encounter cultural differences and manage conflict.

For this reason she is looking for people from India working as a teacher in one of the Gulf countries who are willing to participate in the research, or people who are otherwise engaged with intercultural communication or education in the region.

More information about the thesis proposal can be found via www.lindajdewit.com/research/.

Linda J. de Wit Intern Profile

CID PeopleLinda J. de Wit is a master’s student in the Global Studies Programme at Freiburg University, Germany, for which she has spent semesters at the FLASCO research institute in Buenos Aires, and Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi.

Linda de WitShe obtained her bachelor’s degrees in Political Science and Philosophy from Leiden University in the Netherlands. After graduating in 2013 she traveled, worked and studied across four continents, which is how she discovered intercultural communication.

She is especially interested in religion and the Middle East, and much of her free time is taken up by learning languages, writing, photography, and cooking.

For her internship at CID, her tasks will include translating, graphic design, updating databases and writing guest contributions.

Besides her work for CID she is now preparing a research for her master’s thesis, which will look at how Indian teachers working in the Persian Gulf encounter cultural differences and manage conflict.

 

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