Communication in Emerging Democracies – Grants

Call for Proposals
Grants from the Dale Leathers Fund to Promote Communication Studies in Emerging Democracies
National Communication Association

NCA seeks proposals for activities that promote scholarship and teaching of Communication Studies to benefit emerging democracies and their peoples. Such activities may include (but are not limited to) the following:
*International travel for residents of emerging democracies to attend conferences or advanced training in Communication Studies
*International travel for U.S. residents to disseminate Communication scholarship or to conduct training in Communication Studies in emerging democracies
*Procuring and disseminating scholarly and instructional materials in Communication Studies for use by institutions within emerging democracies
*Research about various topics in communication conducted by residents of emerging democracies who would otherwise lack adequate support for such research
*Research about communication phenomena in emerging democracies, which may be conducted by U.S. scholars or by others, and which promises to directly or indirectly promote effective communication practices

General Procedures for Proposals
Proposals should not exceed 10 pages and shall include the following information:
(1)      a rationale for considering the target nation an emerging democracy;
(2)      a clear statement of methods or listing of activities, depending on the nature of the proposal;
(3)      a clear statement of expected outcomes and their relationship to the purpose of the grant;
(4)      a clear statement of the intended use of monies provided by the grant;
(5)      an abbreviated, 3 page CV of applicant or principal investigator.

Deadline to submit proposal is October 1, 2014.

Visit www.natcom.org/LeathersFund for application materials and additional information.

Int’l scholars wanted: Society for History of Technology

Call for Nominations for International Scholars
Society for the History of Technology (SHOT), 2014

Each year the Society for the History of Technology designates up to four International Scholars for a two-year term. One of the goals of the International Scholars program is to foster an international network of scholars in the history of technology that will benefit all members of the Society. We particularly welcome applications from or nominations of scholars from Africa, Asia and Latin America. Graduate students, post-docs, and visiting scholars who are living and working in North America are not eligible to become International Scholars; however, they are eligible to apply once they return to their home countries.

Benefits and Support
International Scholars shall receive regular SHOT membership at no cost during their two-year term. At each annual meeting, SHOT will host a special gathering to welcome current International Scholars, introduce them to SHOT officers, and discuss with them SHOT’s international outreach and the international intellectual dimensions of our field.

International Scholars will participate in an email discussion list of all current International Scholars and the Internationalization Committee. Through the list International Scholars can seek support in writing paper abstracts for SHOT’s annual meeting and other activities in their task as ambassadors for the Society.

Conditions
As a condition of appointment, SHOT requires International Scholars to submit at least one paper proposal for SHOT’s annual meeting during their two-year term. While paper proposals from International Scholars will not automatically be accepted for the annual meeting, SHOT encourages the program committee to give these proposals special consideration.

SHOT also requires International Scholars to submit a travel grant application for each of the two SHOT annual meetings during the two years of their appointment. International Scholars receive highest priority for SHOT funding. Travel grant funds will help pay for travel expenses for International Scholars to attend the annual meeting and for basic conference registration, although not for lodging. For more information, please check the SHOT Travel Grant information page, available by link from either the SHOT annual meeting web page or the SHOT awards web page.

To inform the SHOT community about the state and developments of the history of technology in their regions, progress in disseminating information about the Society and stimulating scholarly activities in the history of technology, International Scholars commit themselves to at least one publication in the SHOT Newsletter or on the SHOT website.

Application
To nominate yourself or someone else as an International Scholar, please send a letter and a brief curriculum vitae to EACH member of the Internationalization Committee and to SHOT Secretary David Lucsko (shotsec [at] auburn [dot] edu). In the letter, please describe your goals in becoming a SHOT International Scholar, address the current state of history of technology in your home country and home institution, state how your position as a SHOT International Scholar will benefit the study of history of technology in your home country, and suggest what insights your research can bring to the SHOT community The deadline of 2014 nominations is April 15. New candidates will be selected and announced by the beginning of June. For more information about the application procedures, please visit our website.

2014 SHOT Internationalization Committee
Itty Abraham           (seaai [at] nus [dot] edu [dot] sg)
Sulfikar Amir           (SULFIKAR [at] ntu [dot] edu [dot] sg)
Francesca Bray     (francesca.bray [at] ed [dot] ac [dot] uk)
Yulia Frumer           (yfrumer [at] jhu [dot] edu)
Adam Lucas           (alucas [at] uow [dot] edu [dot] au)
Honghong Tinn       (hhtinn [at] gmail [dot] com)

CFP Promoting Comm in Emerging Democracies

Call for Proposals 

Promotion of Communication in Emerging Democracies
Grant Funded by The Dale G. Leathers Memorial Fund to Promote Communication Studies in Emerging Democracies

Proposals are being solicited that promote scholarship and teaching of communication studies to benefit emerging democracies and their peoples. Any activity which contributes to this goal is potentially eligible for funding. Such activities include (but are not limited to) the following:

*International travel for residents of emerging democracies to attend conferences or advanced training in communication studies

*International travel for U.S. residents to disseminate communication scholarship or to conduct training in communication studies in emerging democracies

*Procuring and disseminating scholarly and instructional materials in communication studies for use by institutions within emerging democracies

*Research about various topics in communication conducted by residents of emerging democracies who would otherwise lack adequate support for such research

*Research about communication phenomena in emerging democracies, which may be conducted by U.S. scholars or by others, and which promises to directly or indirectly promote effective communication practices

General Procedures for Proposals

Proposals should not exceed 10 pages and shall include the following information:

(1)      rational for considering the target nation an emerging democracy

(2)      a clear statement of methods or listing of activities, depending on the nature of the proposal

(3)      a clear statement of expected outcomes and their relationship to the purpose of the grant

(4)      a clear statement of the intended use of monies provided by the grant

(5)      an abbreviated, 3 page CV of applicant or principle investigator

Proposals will be reviewed and funded on an annual cycle. If the Trustees deem that no satisfactory proposals have been received in a particular cycle, or if the Trustees deem that available funds are insufficient to justify an award during a given cycle, no award need be made.

Deadline to submit proposal is October 1, 2013.

Grantees will be required to follow the National Communication Association’s Promotional Activities and Sponsorship Acknowledgement Policy for NCA-Funded Events and Projects.

All applicants are encouraged to check with their home institution regarding the rules and regulations involved with accepting grants to be sure applicants follow acceptable practice for their institution and state.  NCA recommends that you share the protocol for assessment and reporting on grants with your grant officer before applying.

Grant awards are funded by The Dale G. Leathers Memorial Fund to Promote Communication Studies in Emerging Democracies. For 2014, the total grant amount available is $500, and must be spent within the 2014 calendar year.

Please send proposals to Brad Mello at bmello AT natcom.org.  Proposal must be in English.

Grant $ for international travel

Micro Grants for Intercultural Dialogue

The National Communication Association allocated $5000 to be distributed as micro grants for intercultural dialogue through the Center for Intercultural Dialogue.

These micro grants are intended to support either or both of the two types of activities described in the mission of the Center: study of intercultural dialogues by Communication scholars, and/or participation in intercultural dialogue through academic interactions between Communication scholars based in different countries, or different linguistic and cultural regions. These grants are sufficient to provide seed funding only: no more than $1000 maximum can be awarded to any one individual. The goal is to encourage international, intercultural, interlingual collaborative research by giving enough funding to offset the cost of airfare only, while providing opportunity (and cause) for matching grants from universities.

If you already have lots of international connections, this grant is not for you – obviously you don’t need it. But if you are at a small college, or if you are a new scholar, and have not yet established significant international connections related to research, you are the intended audience for this competition. If you have been reading publications by an international scholar on a topic of potential relevance to your own research, consider a short trip to discuss ways to collaborate on a future project. If you do not know who has been doing relevant work, check the sources you’ve been reading lately, ask your colleagues, and/or think about who you know from graduate school or who you met (or heard present) recently at a conference. Find someone with similar interests who takes a different stance by virtue of being based in a different cultural context.

The intention is to support the development of new intercultural, professional connections. Thus continuing collaborations are ineligible. Those based in the US are expected to propose travel outside the country. International scholars currently living outside their country of origin are asked to establish a new affiliation in a different region rather than proposing a return to their homeland. We recognize that much interesting work can be done within a country between cultural groups, however this grant program focuses on connecting researchers who are not yet connected, across cultural regions that are typically disconnected. This rationale of cross-cultural connection must be explicit in the project description.

Applicants will need to describe their project, provide a brief resume, a short note from their department chair documenting their current status, and one from the host scholar expressing interest in holding conversations related to research. The initial deadline for review of proposals is November 15, 2012. If funds remain after the initial set of grants are awarded, March 15, 2013 will be the second deadline.

CID Grant Application NCA2012

December 18, 2012 UPDATE: The micro grants for intercultural dialogue have now been awarded, and all funding is being distributed as a result of the first round of applications, so there will not be a second round. See here for the results.

ICA travel funds for international scholars

The Road to Boston

Larry Gross, President-Elect, International Communication Association

Larry Gross“First, a little institutional history.

In the early 1990s I chaired an ICA Task Force on Diversity that was charged, among other things, with recommending ways to increase the attendance at conferences and participation in the organization by members of underrepresented minorities in the United States. The Task Force, whose members included Julie D’Acci, Navita James, Geetu Melwani, Federico Subervi, James Taylor, and Angharad Valdivia, made a recommendation to the Board that a program of travel grants be initiated to support minority students who had papers accepted for the ICA conference.

After several years of discussion – or so it seems in recollection — at the Albuquerque meetings in May 1995 the ICA Board adopted the proposal to add a surcharge of $1USD to each conference registration fee and use the funds so obtained to provide travel scholarships to minority students attending the Chicago meetings (minority being defined here as African-American, Hispanic/Latino/a, Native American, Pacific Islander).

The program began small. In the 1996 Report of the Task Force, I noted:

Four nominations were forwarded from divisions to the ICA Headquarters, and an ad hoc consultative group (Task Force Chair Larry Gross, Conference Program Chair Stan Deetz, and ICA Executive Director Bob Cox) decided to award grants totaling $1300 USD to the four nominees (the figure of $1300 USD was agreed on as a reasonable estimate of the surcharge yield). We agreed to allocate $300 USD to each of three “mainland” student members, and $400 USD to a student member travelling from Hawaii.

That was then.

In the decade and a half since the travel awards were initiated, ICA has undergone a radical shift towards internationalization – a commitment to making the “I” in its name reflect reality as well as aspiration – and the travel grant program has expanded its focus to support the goal of encouraging and enabling participation of students, and faculty, from UN Tier B and C countries. In 2010, in Singapore, the Board voted to increase the conference fee surcharge (actually, this is folded into the conference fee) to $5.00 USD.

In 2003 the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania endowed two funds in support of conference travel grants (one, embarrassingly, named in my honor). The interest from these funds provides additional money to the available pool of travel support. Finally, many divisions devote a large portion of the funds available to them to providing travel grants.

This year a total of over $35,000 USD was awarded to 55 conference participants. We are able to provide travel grants ranging from $500 USD to $900 USD (the amounts vary in relation to the distance and travel costs incurred). Travel fund recipients come from 22 countries, including the United States. Forty-three of the recipients are students; 12 are faculty members. The largest number come from the United States (22), followed by the People’s Republic of China and Korea with five each. Other countries represented include Argentina, Costa Rica, Egypt, India, Malaysia, Mexico, the Philippines, Romania and Singapore.

The road to this point has been long, but the goal is an important one to ICA’s mission and the progress we’ve made since we started this effort 15 years ago is truly gratifying, even while it is clear that we still have some distance to go. So, please make the journey to Boston and join us as we build the ICA we all want to see flourish.”

from April 2011 ICA newsletter.