KC33: Moral Conflict Translated into Greek

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#33: Moral Conflict, which Kristen L. Cole wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Anastasia Karakitsou  has now translated into Greek. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC33 Moral Conflict_GreekCole, K. L. (2018). Moral conflict (Greek). (A. Karakitsou, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 33. Retrieved from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2018/05/kc33-moral-conflict_greek.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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KC19 Multiculturalism Translated into Greek

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#19: Multiculturalism, which Polina Golovátina-Mora and Raúl Alberto Mora wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Anastasia Karakitsou  has now translated into Greek. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC19 Multiculturalism_GreekGolovátina-Mora, P., & Mora, R. A. (2018). Multiculturalism (Greek). (A. Karakitsou, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 19. Retrieved from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2018/03/kc19-multiculturalism_greek.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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KC27 Globalization Translated into Greek

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#27: Globalization, which Shiv Ganesh and Cynthia Stohl wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Anastasia Karakitsou has now translated into Greek. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC27 Globalization_GreekGanesh, S., & Stohl, C. (2018). Globalization [Greek]. (A. Karakitsou, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 27. Retrieved from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2018/03/kc27-globalization_greek.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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Xenophobia vs. Intercultural Dialogue

Guest PostsXenophobia vs. Intercultural Dialogue by Anastasia A. Karakitsou

https://wronghands1.com/2016/07/01/xenophobic-world-map/
Figure 1: From Atkinson, 2016.

The Psychology of Xenophobia

The term xenophobia comes from the Greek words for foreigner/ stranger (xenos) and fear (phobia) and is pretty self-explanatory: it describes the condition where I fear anything that is foreign to me (and anything that is foreign to the likes of me). Xenophobia, analysed in its roots as the age-old “fear of the unknown”, naturally generates apprehension and anxiety in the human mind (or soul, depending on your beliefs), because fear is an all-too-powerful emotion. Evolutionarily speaking, fear has been a crucial survival tool for our ancestors, as it alerted them to the surrounding dangers by activating their fight or flight response. This is why xeno-phobia encourages social discrimination and prejudice towards a specific group labelled as “fear-inducing,” i.e., as a threat to our national identity, to our racial purity, to our law and order, etc. Spurred by powerful and primeval fear, initial discrimination and prejudice may well escalate to hatred and actual, physical violence; psychologically speaking, fear is, for the most of us, too overpowering to manage and reason with.

The question is who is in the position to label x, y, z social group as a threat.

Continue reading “Xenophobia vs. Intercultural Dialogue”

Anastasia Karakitsou Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesAnastasia Karakitsou was born in Athens, Greece. She has an MA in Professional Language and Intercultural Studies from the University of Leeds, UK (graduating with Distinction in 2017), and a BA in English Language and Literature from the University of Athens, Greece (2012). She took part in the Erasmus program during the 2010 fall semester by attending the İstanbul Kültür Üniversitesi (Turkey), where she experienced first-hand the problems of ‘inappropriate’ as well as the potential of ‘appropriate’ intercultural communication. Then, she fell in love with observing, examining and studying those issues.

Anastasia Karakitsou

She has worked as a TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) teacher and as an English language exams preparation coach in Athens (2012-2016), and has been doing voluntary and paid work as an EN>GR/ GR>EN translator ever since. She has taken part in The challenges in dealing with cultural practices that differ from one’s own in the intercultural communication exchange among individuals from diverse cultures research project led by the University of Leeds (UK) and the University of Guanajuato (Mexico) (November 2017-February 2018). She also worked as a Research Assistant for The Anthropology of Swimming: Exploring Communication, Identity and Inclusivity in British Swimming Pools (University of Leeds, July 2017).

Anastasia is interested mainly in two areas: anthropology and linguistics, that is cultures and languages (which, of course, intertwine). Issues of interest in anthropology include the features that makes us human; the evolution of Homo Sapiens compared to the fate of other extinct (?) Homo species; and the negotiation and renegotiation of our human identity through language, ethnicity, collective social memories, symbols, etc. In the area of linguistics fall issues such as how our language is shaped by and shapes our world (cf. Sapir-Whorf hypothesis; Wittgenstein’s “the limits of my language mean the limits of my world”); how language is strategically used to shape our thoughts and, subsequently, our actions (through racist/ xenophobic rhetoric, also through translation; the hate speech vs. free speech debate); how language styles, dialects and accents are functionalized to categorize people into marginalized groups (e.g. as women, as low-class or low-educated, basically as unfit for a particular behavior or role).

Her goal is to contribute to the formation of an open and diverse multicultural society, by critically thinking about and resisting the linguistically and culturally manipulated status quo.

KC15 Cultural Pluralism Translated into Greek

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#15: Cultural Pluralism, which Robyn Penman wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Anastasia Karakitsou has now translated into Greek. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC15 Cultural Pluralism_GreekPenman, R. (2018). Cultural pluralism [Greek]. (A. Karakitsou, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 15. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2018/01/kc-15-cultural-pluralism_greek.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

KC16 Migration Translated into Greek

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#16: Migration, which Saskia Witteborn wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Anastasia Karakitsou has now translated into Greek. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC16 Migration_GreekWitteborn, S. (2018). Migration [Greek]. (A. Karakitsou, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 16. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/12/kc16-migration_greek1.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

KC89: Xenophobia

Key Concepts in ICDThe next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. This is KC#89: Xenophobia, by Anastasia Karakitsou. (Note that “xenophobia” was dictionary.com’s word of the year in 2016, so this concept is particularly timely.) Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. Lists organized chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC89 XenophobiaKarakitsou, A. (2017). Xenophobia. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 89. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/12/kc89-xenoophobia.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


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KC6 Intercultural Capital Translated into Greek

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#6: Intercultural Capital, which Andreas Pöllmann wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Anastasia Karakitsou has now translated into Greek. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC6 Intercultural Capital_GreekPöllmann, A. (2017). Intercultural capital [Greek]. (A. Karakitsou, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 6. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/12/kc6-intercultural-capital_greek.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.