U York Job Ads: Sociology (UK)

“JobLecturer in Sociology, University of York – Heslington Campus (UK). Deadline: 3 February 2019.

The Department of Sociology invites applications for three full-time, permanent Lecturers in Sociology. You will have expertise in one (or more) of the following three substantive/methodological areas: 1) criminology and/or the sociology of crime and deviance; 2) race and ethnicity; 3) language and social interaction, especially conversation analysis.

CFP: How to Analyze Authority and Power in Interaction (Japan)

The Language and Social Interaction and Organizational Communication divisions of the International Communication Association present How to analyze authority and power in interaction
A preconference to the 2016 meeting of the International Communication Association
July 9, 2016, 9am to 5pm
Fukuoka Sea Hawk Hotel, Japan
Organized by Nicolas Bencherki, Frédérik Matte and François Cooren

Rationale
Historically, studies on language and social interaction have often been criticized for their alleged incapacity to deal with questions of power, coercion and domination (Cooren, 2007). By exclusively focusing on what people do in interactional scenes, LSI scholars have indeed been accused of being ill equipped to address and analyze what makes the interactions they study possible (Reed, 2010). In response, macro-sociologists and critical scholars keep reaffirming the key role that structures, ideologies and power relationships play in the constitution of interactions. However, they rarely analyze conversations or dialogues per se, which means that interaction studies seem often immune to this kind of consideration.

For the past twenty years, however, a growing movement of scholars has decided to go beyond the sterile opposition between agency and structure by openly analyzing everything that happens to make a difference in a given interaction (Bartesaghi, 2009, 2014, Bencherki and Cooren, 2011; Benoit-Barné and Cooren, 2009; Castor and Cooren, 2006; Chiang, 2015; Cooren and Matte, 2010; Taylor and Van Every, 2011, 2014). Instead of exclusively focusing on what people do, these scholars have also taken into account other forms of agency or authorship that seem to make a difference through people’s turns of talk.

How to participate
For this preconference, we would like to encourage scholars to submit papers that explicitly (1) deal with questions of power/authority and (2) illustrate their approach by studying the detail of the interaction that organizers selected. In other words, each participant is invited to shed his or her own original light on the same common interaction.

Any kind of perspective – Conversation Analysis (Pomerantz & Fehr, 1997; Sacks & Jefferson, 1992; Sanders, 2005), Actor Network Theory (ANT) (Latour, 1986; Law, 1991), CCO (Communicative Constitution of Organization) (Benoit-Barné & Cooren, 2009; Bourgoin & Bencherki, 2015; Taylor & Van Every, 2014), Critical Discourse Analysis (Fairclough, 2013; Fairclough & Wodak, 1997; van Dijk, 1993), ethnography of communication (Carbaugh & Boromisza-Habashi, 2015; Hymes, 1964; Kalou & Sadler-Smith, 2015), etc. – is welcome as long as these two requirements are met.

This preconference could be of interest to Language and Social Interaction and Organizational Communication scholars, but representatives of other divisions are, of course, also welcome.

Submit a 500-word abstracts including an analysis outline on the preconference website by 18 January.

Responses will be sent by 15 February.

The interaction: “Under whose authority?”
Kim Davis denies marriage licenses to LGBT couples. You may have heard of Kim Davis, the Rowan County, Kentucky, county clerk who has defied court orders in her refusal to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. She has gained quite a bit of fame, either as a hero to conservative supporters, or on the contrary in a very negative way among same-sex marriage supporters and within the LGTB community. We propose, as a common empirical material to our discussions, that participants to the preconference use their own analytical approach to analyze the following news excerpt (we apologize any advertisement that may appear at the beginning of the video). You can download the excerpt’s full transcript.

What sense would you make of this excerpt? What does the theoretical or analytical approach that you adopt reveal about what went on in Kim Davis’ office on that day? What may other perspectives be missing or leaving aside? What makes a difference, or what should we take into account, in order to explain the situation we are witnessing in the video? Is this video even enough to make any sense at all of the events? Let us know!

In addition to briefly presenting a theoretical and analytical framework, your abstract should also include a few elements or an outline of an analysis of the excerpt. Show us how this excerpt may be studied differently thanks to the concepts, tools or lenses that your framework provides.

References

Bartesaghi, M. (2009). How the therapist does authority: Six strategies for substituting client accounts in the session. Communication & Medicine, 6(1), 15-25.

Bartesaghi, M. (2014). Coordination: Examining Weather as a “Matter of Concern.” Communication Studies, 65(5), 535-557. http://doi.org/10.1080/10510974.2014.957337

Bencherki, N., & Cooren, F. (2011). To have or not to be: the possessive constitution of organization. Human Relations, 64(12), 1579-1607. http://doi.org/10.1177/0018726711424227

Benoit-Barné, C., & Cooren, F. (2009). The Accomplishment of Authority Through Presentification: How Authority Is Distributed Among and Negotiated by Organizational Members. Management Communication Quarterly, 23(1), 5-31. http://doi.org/10.1177/0893318909335414

Bourgoin, A., & Bencherki, N. (2015). The performance of authority in organizations. Presented at the European Group for Organization Studies, Athens, Greece.

Carbaugh, D., & Boromisza-Habashi, D. (2015). Ethnography of Communication. In The International Encyclopedia of Language and Social Interaction. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/9781118611463.wbielsi119/abstract

Castor, T., & Cooren, F. (2006). Organizations as Hybrid forms of Life: The Implications of the Selection of Agency in Problem Formulation. Management Communication Quarterly, 19(4), 570-600. http://doi.org/10.1177/0893318905284764

Chiang, S.-Y. (2015). Power and Discourse. In K. Tracy, C. Ilie, & T. Sandel (Eds.), The International Encyclopedia of Language and Social Interaction. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/9781118611463.wbielsi149/abstract

Cooren, F. (Ed.). (2007). Interacting and organizing: analyses of a management meeting. Mahwah, N.J: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Cooren, F., & Matte, F. (2010). For a constitutive pragmatics: Obama, Médecins Sans Frontières and the measuring stick. Pragmatics and Society, 1(1), 9-31. http://doi.org/10.1075/ps.1.1.02coo

Fairclough, N. (2013). Critical Discourse Analysis: The Critical Study of Language. Routledge.

Fairclough, N., & Wodak, R. (1997). Critical discourse analysis. In T. A. van Dijk (Ed.), Discourse as social interaction (pp. 258-284). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Hymes, D. (1964). Introduction: Toward Ethnographies of Communication. American Anthropologist, 66(6), 1-34. http://doi.org/10.1525/aa.1964.66.suppl_3.02a00010

Kalou, Z., & Sadler-Smith, E. (2015). Using Ethnography of Communication in Organizational Research. Organizational Research Methods, 18(4), 629.

Latour, B. (1986). The Powers of Association. In J. Law (Ed.), Power, action and belief: a new sociology of knowledge? (pp. 264-280). London: Routledge.

Law, J. (1991). A Sociology of monsters: essays on power, technology, and domination. New York: Routledge.

Pomerantz, A., & Fehr, B. J. (1997). Conversation Analysis: An Approach to the Study of Social Action as Sense Making Practices. In T. A. van Dijk (Ed.), Discourse as Social Interaction (pp. 64-91). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Reed, M. (2010). Is Communication Constitutive of Organization? Management Communication Quarterly, 24(1), 151-157. http://doi.org/10.1177/0893318909351583

Sacks, H., & Jefferson, G. (1992). Lectures on conversation. Oxford, UK?; Cambridge, Mass.: Blackwell.

Sanders, R. E. (2005). Preface to section II: Conversation analysis. In K. L. Fitch & R. E. Sanders (Eds.), Handbook of language and social interaction (pp. 67-70). Mahwah, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Retrieved from http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0420/2004016806.html

Taylor, J. R., & Van Every, E. J. (2011). The situated organization: Studies in the pragmatics of communication research. New York, NY: Routledge.

Taylor, J. R., & Van Every, E. J. (2014). When Organization Fails: Why Authority Matters. New York, NY: Routledge.

van Dijk, T. A. (1993). Principles of Critical Discourse Analysis. Discourse & Society, 4(2), 249-283. http://doi.org/10.1177/0957926593004002006

CFP Groningen Symposium on Language and Social Interaction (The Netherlands)

The second Groningen Symposium on Language and Social Interaction (GSLI) will be organized by the University of Groningen, Center for Language and Cognition on January 22, 2016. The theme of this year’s symposium is ‘Interaction and Health Care’. The symposium aims to bring together scholars interested in interaction in health care settings between clients and health care professionals. The symposium aims to cover a wide range of different health care settings ( e.g. consultations between general practitioners and patients, therapeutic interactions, clinic visits, etc.). The common ground is that all contributions focus on the ways health care professionals and clients collaboratively shape and organize their medical activities and tasks through interaction.

GSLI is glad to announce that Ruth Parry (University of Nottingham) has accepted our invitation as keynote speaker of the Symposium.

GSLI welcomes contributions for 20-minute presentations followed by 10 minutes for questions on any topic investigating the interaction between health care professionals and clients. Abstracts should not exceed 3000 characters including spaces (around 400 words), and can be uploaded till October 12, 2015.

CFP Groningen Symposium on Language and Social Interaction (Netherlands)

Groningen Symposium on Language and Social Interaction

The second Groningen Symposium on Language and Social Interaction (GSLI) will be organized by the University of Groningen, Center for Language and Cognition on January 22, 2016. The theme of this year’s symposium is ‘Interaction and Health Care’. The symposium aims to bring together scholars interested in interaction in health care settings between clients and health care professionals. The symposium aims to cover a wide range of different health care settings ( e.g. consultations between general practitioners and patients, therapeutic interactions, clinic visits, etc.). The common ground is that all contributions focus on the ways health care professionals and clients collaboratively shape and organize their medical activities and tasks through interaction.

GSLI is glad to announce that Ruth Parry (University of Nottingham) has accepted our invitation as keynote speaker of the Symposium.

Registration and abstract submission open: July 6, 2015
Deadline for abstracts: September 7, 2015
Notification of acceptance: November 2, 2015
Deadline for registration: December 7, 2015
Symposium: January 22, 2016

Ling Chen researcher profile

RESEARCHER PROFILE

Ling ChenLing Chen (PhD, Ohio State Univ.) is a Professor in the School of Communication, Hong Kong Baptist University. Her areas of interest include Chinese Communication, Communication Competence, Intercultural Communication, Language and Social Interaction, and Organizational Communication. Her interest in the role of culture in communication in different social contexts at various level of interaction and in intercultural encounters has been a center of her research and scholarship. She has published 2 books and more than 50 articles in journals such as Communication Monographs, Communication Research, Human Communication Research, International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Management Communication Quarterly, Research on Language and Social Interaction, etc. and conducted research on such topics as verbal adaptive strategies in native-nonnative speaker interaction, managerial communication in Chinese business organizations, friendship dialectics among Chinese in Hong Kong, cultural learning of sojourners, cultural identity as a production in process, Chinese traditional value orientations, argumentative tendency of Chinese and Japanese.

Chen has been active in professional associations and served in a variety of capacities, e.g., as Intercultural Communication Division Chair of the International Communication Association, President of the Association for Chinese Communication Studies and Vice-President of China’s Association for Intercultural Communication Studies. Chen is currently Editor of Management Communication Quarterly, Associate Editor of Communication Theory, has also served and is serving on the editorial board of a number of international journals, in communication and related disciplines, e.g., Chinese Journal of Communication, Communication Studies, Discourse and Communication, Human Communication Research, Howard Journal of Communications, Journal of Applied Communication Research, Journal of Communication, Journal of Intercultural Communication Research, and Management Communication Quarterly.

Intercultural dialogue research

I am currently preparing an entry on intercultural dialogue for the International Encyclopedia of Language and Social Interaction. This is a general call for anyone who has published on the topic to send me an email (intercult.dialogue@gmail.com) with a citation you propose for potential mention in the entry. It needs to be a specific discussion of intercultural dialogue, not of intercultural communication more generally. And it needs to be about language and/or interaction, not media, not even social media, given the publication context.

If you want to know what I have already read and am currently considering for inclusion in the discussion, see the list of publications on intercultural dialogue posted to this site (although this includes far more sources than can be mentioned). As a thank you for the time you take in sending in suggestions, I will add all relevant citations received to this publications list, so that others may learn about them.

Thanks!

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

Portland State U job ad

The Department of Communication at Portland State University (PSU) seeks a full-time, nine-month, tenure-track, Assistant Professor to begin September 16, 2013. To be considered, applicants must specialize in one or more of the following areas in Communication: (1) Critical/Cultural; (2) Interpersonal (including Language and Social Interaction); (3) Media/Mediated; or (4) Organizational Communication. Applicants must also demonstrate the capacity to secure external funding. Primary job requirements include publishing research, effectively teaching undergraduate and graduate (i.e., Masters) students, participating in departmental and university service, and securing external funding. Typical teaching load is 2/2/2. Applicants must have their Ph.D. (in Communication or a closely allied discipline) in hand by time of hire. PSU is an Affirmative-Action, Equal-Opportunity Institution and welcomes applications from candidates who support diversity. Women and members of minority groups are encouraged to apply.

PSU is the largest university in the Oregon University System, with approximately 29,000 students. PSU offers an excellent benefits package (including healthcare), a generous retirement and vacation package, and reduced tuition rates for employees, their spouses, and their dependents. For more information about our department, the university, and its strategic plan, please visit our website (see ‘open position’ under ‘useful links’).

Review of applications will begin Friday, October 5th, and will continue until the position is filled. Regarding late submissions, please contact the search chair directly (see below). Applications may be either mailed directly to the department in hard-copy form, or more preferably emailed (see below). Only complete applications will be reviewed, which consist of (in order, please): (1) letter of application; (2) curriculum vita; (3) up to three samples of published (or in-press) research; (4) evidence of teaching effectiveness; (5) a separate page with applicant’s contact information (including email and phone); and (6) a separate page with the name and contact information of three people who agree to act as references/recommenders (Note: Please do not submit letters of recommendation, which may be solicited at a later stage in the review process). Email applications must be in .pdf format, include the applicant’s name in the subject line (e.g., “Doe, John: PSU Communication Job”), and be sent to: commdept@pdx.edu. Hard copies must be mailed to: Dr. Jeffrey D. Robinson, Attn. Job Search, University Center Building, 520 SW Harrison Street, Suite 440, Portland, OR 97201. Please make enquiries to the search chair: Dr. Jeffrey D. Robinson.

Patricia O. Covarrubias

Patricia CovarrubiasPatricia O. Covarrubias (Ph.D. University of Washington, 1999) is Associate Professor and Director of the M.A. Program in the Department of Communication and Journalism at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, New Mexico.  My previous careers include work as a broadcast journalist for KCRA-TV (NBC affiliate in Sacramento, California) and owner of OCELOTL, a consulting company providing presentation skills to US and Japanese business persons.

My academic research focuses on understanding and describing how local cultures influence people’s ways of communicating and vice versa, and on describing how culturally-grounded communicative practices reflect and create a unique life for groups of people.  Ultimately, I am interested in the influence of culture and cultural diversity in the activities and events of everyday life across a variety of contexts.   My research goals include contributing to the ethnography of communication and to language and social interaction approaches.  Further, my aim is to contribute to cultural and intercultural communication, metaphors as communication, cultural/intercultural communication in health contexts, and the much understudied communicative aspect of communicative silence.  In whatever context, my professional passions and research impetus are driven by my personal ideals for achieving social inclusivity and justice, improving institutional (and other) contexts, more peaceful living, richer multicultural experience, and greater benefits from our human socio-cultural distinctiveness.

In the area of communicative silence I am interested in exploring silences as “generative” rather than “consumptive” enactments.  For example, I have studied silence as a generative means for perpetuating, particularizing, and/or protecting culture.  To this research I would like to add uses of silence to enact social resistance for purposes of emancipation.  Also, I am interested in studying the kinds of social worlds people create when competing culturally situated silences collide.  For example, using American Indian examples, I have taken a critical look at silence enactments that reveal what I call “discriminatory silence” within the context of the college classroom.  In future work, I hope to explore the silencing of women who practice orthodox religions, particularly to not exclusively, in college contexts.  The study of communicative silence is a much under-studied aspect in the field of communication, among other academic fields, and my goal is to contribute to centralizing its importance in studies about human communication.

My past research includes ethnographic investigation of the ways of speaking of native Mexican construction workers and the ways they use pronominal address to create interpersonal webs that in turn enabled them to achieve workplace cooperation.  This work was the focus of my doctoral dissertation, which subsequently was published as a book under the title, Culture, Communication, and Cooperation: Interpersonal Relations and Pronominal Address in a Mexican Organization.

In 2014-2015 I was one of nine professors selected for the first ever Teaching Fellows program at UNM. As part of my commitment to this program I am studying some unexplored reasons why so many Latino students drop out of college at undergraduate and graduate levels. Using double bind theory I am looking at potentially contradictory messages about college within Latino families. This project also involves designing creative writing assignments to help students manage their double bind realities and persist in accomplishing their goals of graduating from college.

Another current research project involves problematizing the concepts of respect and respeto (respect in Spanish) as they are understood in the applied context of immigration discourses. This study argues that respect and respeto are not necessarily equivalent and, thus, serve as loci for sociocultural misunderstandings and alienation. Because my research commitments embrace continuing work with Mexican/Hispanic/Latina(o)/Chicana(o) ways of communicating, potential new directions consist of inquiry into the emotional impact of undocumented immigration on behalf of Mexican women.  This project would help address the complicated impact of a contemporary social problem that affects the health, health care, and clinical practices enacted in New Mexican communities.

Publications & Other Productivity
Book

Covarrubias, P. (2002 Culture, communication, and cooperation: Interpersonal relations and pronominal address in a Mexican organization, Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, Boulder, CO. (Soft cover edition 2005)

Articles
Covarrubias, P., & Windchief, S. (2009) Silences in Stewardship: Some American Indian College Students Examples.  The Howard Journal of Communications, 20, 4, 1-20.

Covarrubias, P. (2008). Masked Silence Sequences: Hearing Discrimination in the College Classroom. Communication, Culture & Critique, 1, 3, 227-252.

Covarrubias, P. (2007). (Un)biased in Western theory: Generative silence in American Indian communication. Communication Monographs, 74, 2, 265-271.

Philipsen, G., Aoki, E., Castor, T., Coutu, L., Covarrubias, P., Jabs, L., Kane, M., & Winchatz, M. (1997). Reading Ella Cara Deloria’s Waterlily for cultured speech. Iowa Journal of Communication, 29, 31-49. (order of authorship beyond Philipsen was selected at random)

Chapters in edited volumes:
Covarrubias Baillet, P.O. (2009). The Ethnography of Communication. In Littlejohn, S. and K. Foss (Eds.) Encyclopedia of Communication Theory (pp. 355-360). Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications.

Covarrubias Baillet, P.O. (2009). Speech Codes Theory. In Littlejohn, S. and K. Foss (Eds.) Encyclopedia of Communication Theory (pp. 918-924). Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications.

Covarrubias, P. (2005). Homemade talk: Language, identity, and other Mexican legacies for a son’s intercultural competence. In Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz (Ed.), From generation to generation: Maintaining cultural identity over time (pp. 29-47). Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press.

Philipsen, G., Coutu, L. M., & Covarrubias, P. (2005). Speech Codes Theory: Revision, Restatement, and Response to Criticisms. In William Gudykunst (Ed.), Theorizing about communication and culture. Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications. (order of authorship beyond Philipsen was selected at random)

Covarrubias, P. (2000). Of endearment and other terms of address: A Mexican perspective. In M. W. Lustig and J. Koester (Eds.), AmongUS:  Essays on identity, belonging, and intercultural competence.  New York: Longman.

Other
Covarrubias, P. (January 2006). The findings from my invited research presentation, “Defining success: Overhauling our assumptions,” were included in the published conference proceedings, Redefining Student Success: The Challenges and Implications of Extending Access, published by The College Board.

Covarrubias, P., & Turner, M. (Spring 2006). Cultural Codes in Communication, a video production. This video produced on DVD, conceived by Patricia Covarrubias and produced by UNM undergraduate student Mike Turner, served as promotional and teaching tool at a communication codes conference at the University of Washington in May 2006.

Job ad-interaction/intercultural

Assistant Professor of Communication: Language & Social Interaction
University of Wisconsin-Parkside
Beginning Fall 2011

The Communication Department is seeking candidates for a tenure track Assistant Professor to teach courses in Language and Social Interaction (e.g., discourse analysis, ethnography of communication, pragmatics, narrative analysis), with an emphasis in qualitative research on culture, identity, diversity, and/or questions of social justice.  The successful candidate will be able to teach 1-2 sections of Communication and the Human Condition, a large lecture course for entry-level undergraduates (majors and non-majors).  Additional assignments may include courses in Introduction to the Communication Discipline Parts 1 & 2 (theory and research courses), Communication and Ethnicity (African American or Native American sections needed), Intercultural Communication, Interpersonal Communication, Communication and Social Movements, or Health Communication, depending upon interests/expertise and department needs.

Responsibilities:
-Teaching:  teaching classes in the undergraduate program, curriculum development, grading, holding regular office hours.
-Research:  research and scholarly publication, culminating in refereed journal and conference publications. Book publications and grants are welcomed contributions.
-Service:  provide service to the department in support of curriculum, teaching, and service to the university and community. Service includes student advising, serving on departmental and university committees, assisting in departmental and university events.  Contribute to the development and improvement of departmental programs and activities. Contributions to community projects and events are also appreciated.

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:
-Sensitivity to, or experience in, working with a diverse, multicultural population
-Ability to teach introductory communication courses and upper-level courses in Language and Social Interaction at the college level.
-Ability to engage in appropriate instructor-student relationships and interactions and collegial conduct
-Ability to effectively communicate with students, staff and colleagues both orally and in writing
-Knowledge of computer technology (software programs such as MS Word) and ability to learn and use new software/technologies (e.g. D2L course management software)

Qualifications:
Required:
-Ph.D. in Communication at the time of appointment.  ABD’s considered.
-Coursework, scholarship, and/or teaching experience in language and social interaction, and in one or more of the emphases noted in the position description
Preferred:
-Minimum of one year’s teaching experience at the college level, with evidence of teaching effectiveness.
-Some evidence of course development.
-Experience teaching courses in the areas under “additional assignments” in the position description.

Salary:
Salary is commensurate with qualifications and experience. The University of Wisconsin System provides a liberal benefits package, including participation in a state pension plan.

The University:
UW-Parkside is committed to academic excellence, student success, community engagement, and diversity and inclusiveness. The University enrolls approximately 5,100 students, many of whom are first generation and nontraditional students. Located in northern Kenosha County in the Chicago-Milwaukee urban corridor, much of the university’s 700-acre campus has been preserved in its natural wooded and prairie state.

Review of Applications:
Complete applications received by March 18, 2011 are ensured full consideration; position is open until filled.

To Apply:
Interested candidates should submit the following, preferably in electronic format:
-A cover letter of application
-Curriculum vitae
-Copies of graduate transcripts (unofficial copies will be acceptable at the application stage)
-Samples of syllabi from courses taught
-Statement of teaching and research philosophy
-Summary of teaching evaluations
-Examples of scholarly work
-Names and contact information for three references
(Additional materials may be requested.)

Email submissions to:  lambin@uwp.edu

Mail:
Joseph Lambin
University of Wisconsin-Parkside,
Communication Department
900 Wood Road
Kenosha, WI 53141

UW-Parkside is an AA/EEO employer D/M/V/W