KC94 Cross-Cultural Kids Translated into Indonesian

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#94: Cross-Cultural Kids, by Ruth E. Van Reken, published in English earlier this year, and which Anastasia Aldelina Lijadi has now translated into Indonesian.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized alphabetically by conceptchronologically by publication date and number, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC94 CCK_IndonesianVan Reken, R. (2019). Taruna Lintas Budaya (A. A. Lijadi, Trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 94. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2019/07/kc94-cck-indonesian.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

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Key Concept #12: Third Culture Kids Translated into Indonesian

Key Concepts in ICDAs described a week ago, some of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue are being translated into other languages than English. Today I am posting KC12: Third Culture Kids (TCKs), originally written in English in 2014, and now translated into Indonesian, by Anastasia Aldelina Lijadi, of the University of Macau.

All Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC 12 TCK IndonesianLijadi, A. A. (2016). Taruna Budaya Ketiga. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 12. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2016/06/kc12-tck-indonesian2.pdf

Rather than arranging for translation of all concepts into one language at a time, given the diversity of authors, it seems most appropriate to let each author translate their own work into their own languages. Several scholars who were not part of this original group have already written to ask permission to translate concepts, which will expand the number of translations for each concept. This may come across as a little disorganized, especially at the start when only a few translations appear. However, for ideological reasons, it seems the best choice. And it certainly has been a popular decision: I have never received so many offers to do so much work so quickly in response to a request!

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because several dozen are currently in process. And, as always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. As of this writing, 78 have been published in English, but words from Chinese, Portuguese, Japanese, Spanish, Belarusian, German and Arabic have also been introduced (with the discussion provided in English). As of this writing, I have received offers to translate one or more concepts into Arabic, Belarusian, Chinese, Finnish, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Kapampangan, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish and Tagalog (in alphabetical order). There is even a possibility of videos presenting American Sign Language versions. So if anyone else wants to join in the fun, just let me know.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.