KC53 Conflict Management Translated into Polish

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#53: Conflict Management, which Qi Wang wrote for publication in English in 2015, and which Michal Szwarc has now translated into Polish. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC53 Conflict Management_PolishWang, Q. (2018). Conflict management [Polish]. (M. Szwarc, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 53. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/12/kc53-conflict-management_polish.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concept #53: Conflict Management Translated into Chinese

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting  KC53: Conflict Management, which Qi Wang wrote in English in 2015, and which she has now translated into Simplified Chinese. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC53 Conflict management_ChineseWang, Q. (2016). Intercultural capital [Simplified Chinese]. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 53. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2016/12/kc53-conflict-management_chinese.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concept #53: Conflict Management by Qi Wang

Key Concepts in ICDThe next issue of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue is now available. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. [NOTE: this concept was updated in 2016, and the original 2015 version replaced.] Lists organized  chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC53 Conflict ManagementWang, Q. (2015). Conflict management. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 53. Available from https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2016/12/kc53-conflict-management-v2.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

China Internship Program Summer 2015 (Shanghai)

6-week internship program in Shanghai, China, in summer 2015. Six course credits are transferrable through Villanova University.

Quick highlights–

LANGUAGE: No language requirement.

PROGRAM: 3-credit internship and 3-credit comm class.

COST: $7,500; competitive scholarships available.
INCLUDED: Tuition, all cost related with internship placement and visa application, all accommodations with breakfasts, all inner-China domestic travel expenses, meals, and accommodations, etc.
EXCLUDED: Airfare, spending money and some meals.

WHO SHOULD GO: Freshmen, students with no internship (or international) experience before, and any student motivated to become a global citizen and aspire after international workplace experience.

DATES: June 19 to July 26, 2015.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: March 5, 2015.

CONTACT: Dr. Qi Wang at Villanova University.

Qi Wang

RESEARCHER PROFILE

Qi WangQi Wang earned her bachelor’s degree in English at Beijing University (1997). Her master’s (Kent State University, 2001) and doctoral degrees (University of Maryland, 2006) were both in communication. She is currently Associate Professor in the Department of Communication at Villanova University and Area Coordinator in the Interpersonal Communication specialization.

Her teaching and research interests include intercultural and interpersonal communication, with a focus on conflict management. Recently, she has also conducted and published studies in social media use and its influences on interpersonal communication. She has published research in various key communication journals and books (e.g., The SAGE Handbook of Conflict Communication, Human Communication Research, Journal of Public Relations Research, Communication Quarterly, China Media Research, etc.), and presented conference papers annually at the major scholarly communication organizations such as National Communication Association (NCA) and International Communication Associations (ICA). Her papers have won several Top Paper Awards at NCA. Her doctoral dissertation that theorized conflict avoidance strategies won the 2007 Outstanding Dissertation Award at the International Association for Conflict Management at Budapest, Hungary. She has conducted several funded research projects. Her most recent research that investigates the multinational mining industry in Peru has won the scholarship from the Arthur Page Legacy Center at PSU. She has been named as the 2013-2014 Page Legacy Scholar.

She is the 2013-2014 President of the Association for Chinese Communication Scholars (ACCS) affiliated with NCA. She also served as the Student Board Member at ICA in 2005-2006. She has launched the internship program in Shanghai for the Department of Communication at Villanova University in 2014, and also serves as the vice director of the Center for the Cross-Cultural Education and Communication for the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences.

Key publications

Wang, Q., & Bowen, S. P. (in press). The limits of beauty: The impact of physician sex and attractiveness on patient communication perceptions. Communication Research Reports.

Wang, Q., Ni, L., & De la Flor, M. (2013). An intercultural competence model of strategic public relations management in the Peru mining industry context. Journal of Public Relations Research, 0, 1-22. doi: 10.1080/1062726X.2013.795864

Fink, E. L., & Cai, D. A., with Wang, Q. (2013). Quantitative methods for conflict communication research. In J. Oetzel & S. Ting-Toomey. (Eds.), The SAGE handbook of conflict communication: Integrating theory, research, and practice (2nd ed., pp. 41-66). Thousands Oak, CA: Sage.

Wang, Q., Fink, E. L., & Cai, D. A. (2012). The effect of conflict goals on avoidance strategies: What does not communicating communicate? Human Communication Research, 38, 222-252. doi: 10.1111/j.1468-2958.2011.01421.x

Ni, L., & Wang, Q. (2011). Anxiety and uncertainty management in an intercultural setting: The impact on organization-public relationships. Journal of Public Relations Research, 23, 269-301. doi: 10.1080/ 1062726X.2011.582205

Cai, D. A., Fink, E. L., & Wang, Q. (2010). Methods for conflict communication research, with special reference to culture. In D. A. Cai (Ed.) Intercultural communication: Sage benchmarks in communication (Vol. 2, pp. 99-120). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage [Reprint from 2006].

Feeny, K., & Wang, Q. (2010). Comparing the perceptions of success, attributions, and motivations between the Chinese and the U.S. cultures. China Media Research, 6, 56-66.

Wang, Q. (2010). Cultural individualism-collectivism, self-construal, and multiple goal concerns in interpersonal influence situations: A cross-cultural investigation. In Y. Sun (Ed.), Intercultural studies: New frontiers (pp. 197-217). Beijing, China: Foreign Language Teaching and Research Press.

Wang, Q., Fink, E. L., & Cai, D. A. (2008). Loneliness, gender, and parasocial interaction: A uses and gratifications approach. Communication Quarterly, 56, 87-109. doi: 10.1080/01463370701839057

Cai, D. A., Fink, E. L., & Wang, Q. (2006). Quantitative methods for conflict communication research, with special reference to culture. In J. G. Oetzel & S. Ting-Toomey (Eds.), The SAGE handbook of conflict communication: Integrating theory, research, and practice (pp. 33-64). Thousand Oak, CA: Sage.

Current research projects, esp. interdisciplinary or international collaborations

Ni, L., Wang, Q., & De la Flor, M. (r&r). Exploring the relationship between intercultural communication competencies and preferences for public relations practices among public relations students. Journal of Communication Management.

Wang, Q., & Woodard, E. H., IV (manuscript preparation). Loneliness and Facebook use: An intersection of uses and gratifications and social information processing perspectives. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication.

Wang, Q., Cai, D. A., Fink, E. L., Wang, W., & Ni, L. (manuscript preparation). The moderating effect of culture on the relationships between conflict goals and avoidance strategies. Human Communication Research.

Summer internship in Shanghai

2014 Summer Internship Program in Shanghai, China
hosted by the Department of Communication, Villanova University

This program is joined with the summer Internship program at Villanova School of Business (VSB) and the Chinese language summer program (introductory, intermediate, and advanced mandarin classes are all available). So non-COM majors or the students interested in any or all three areas are welcome to apply as well.

Here are some highlights:
1.     Time: 6/21-8/2, 2014
2.     Internship location: Shanghai, China.
3.     6-credit program: 3-credit Internship and 3 credit course Intercultural Communication in China.
a.     5-week internship
b.     No language requirement; English speaking environment
c.     Student specialization-tailored internships placed by a reputable agent that has worked with Villanova for over 10 years.
d.     Full cultural immersion through weekly field trips and 10-day cultural excursion.
e.      Chinese culture-specific and context-focused course design
4.     Joint program with Villanova School of Business and Chinese language program in the Institute of Global and Interdisciplinary Studies:
a.     Mix and match courses/ internships with Business/Economics, and Chinese Language programs
b.     Three faculty members; joint group activities; more fun together!
5.     Estimated cost: $6,950 (final cost will be confirmed by late December, 2013).
Cost includes tuition, shared double room in a hotel affiliated with Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences, Chinese breakfast each morning, orientation, city tour, cultural excursions, internet, student visa, and receptions. Students are required to have a cell phone in China. Some phone companies provide international service. We will assist you if needed. Cost excludes airfare, lunch & dinner, and local transportation.
An optional (highly recommended) group flight will be available for interested students. The program director will work with students to obtain the required Chinese Student Visa.
6.     Application deadline: 3/1/2014
7.   Application form

Please contact Dr. Qi Wang, the Program Director, for any questions or requests. Contact info:
Qi Wang, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Department of Communication Page Legacy Scholar
2013/2014 President, Association for Chinese Communication Studies
16 Garey Hall, 800 E Lancaster Ave, Villanova, PA 19085