Competition: Visual Representations of Multilingualism

AwardsCompetition for visual representations of multilingualism. Deadline: 29 March 2019.

BAAL (British Association for Applied Linguistics) is looking for applied linguists and visual artists to submit visual representations of multilingualism as part of an international competition.

This competition aims to provide a creative opportunity to explore new ways of representing multilingualism through visual means and to stimulate debate and raise awareness about innovative ways of thinking about multilingualism.

Multilingualism has often failed to be represented, or – when it has been represented – this has been done through the co-presence of a select number of languages. However, this raises the question of which languages are represented and why, while recent research about multilingual practices, for example translanguaging, has questioned traditional views of languages as discrete systems. This research has also highlighted the multilingual language user’s capacity to create an apparently seamless flow between named languages and language varieties to achieve effective and meaningful communication in everyday social interaction.

BAAL’s interests are in how applied linguists and artists represent these new ways of thinking about multilingualism creatively and visually and how these images communicate the message about dynamic multilingualism to the public. The competition is open to artists, designers and/or applied linguists working in a range of 2D practices, including, but not limited to: drawing, painting, illustration, graphic design, collage, digital, photography, etc. Sculptural/relief works presented in a 2D format will also be accepted.  Collaborations between artists and applied linguists, and submissions from students of all levels are particularly welcome.

CFP Multilingualism & Identity (UK)

ConferencesMultilingualism and Identity: Interdisciplinary Perspectives, 11-13 September 2019, University of Cambridge, UK. Deadline: 4 February 2019.

Globalisation and migration are two of the most important phenomena in the early 21st century and bring with them a number of opportunities and challenges, not least in terms of how people communicate and learn in new environments, both real and online. As a result of the rise in the movement of people and in interconnectivity more generally, an already multilingual world is becoming even more multilingual. How people use and develop their linguistic repertoires has been the subject of much scholarly attention. Less attention has been paid, however, to the ways in which people identify themselves and are identified by others as multilingual. This conference brings together researchers in applied linguistics, sociolinguistics, modern languages and education studies to explore multilingualism and identity from a variety of perspectives, with the aim of creating new synergies.

Abstracts are invited for presentations at the conference. Papers should address explicitly issues of identity and multilingualism. Organizers particularly welcome submissions which take an interdisciplinary approach to the topic. Conference organised by Linda Fisher and Wendy Ayres-Bennett as part of the AHRC funded OWRI research project, Multilingualism: Empowering Individuals, Transforming Societies (MEITS).

CFP Multilingualism Diversity & Democracy (Sweden)

ConferencesCALL FOR PAPER ABSTRACTS: Multilingualism, Diversity and Democracy (MuDD) Conference 2019, Jönköping University, Sweden, 8-10 April 2019. Deadline: 15 January 2019.

An international conference organized by the Communication, Culture and Diversity (CCD) network-based research group, School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University, and sponsored by the Swedish Research Council.

The MuDD2019 international conference will bring together international experts from across the global-North and the global-South with the intent of interrogating the continuing dichotomized situation (in particular in nation-states like Sweden) wherein mono-lingualism and mono-culturalism constitutes the norm and multilingualism and diversity are seen as the exception. MuDD2019 also has the potential to create new knowledge of relevance for present day challenges related to mobility, migration and communication across virtual-physical spaces. It will bring together senior and junior scholars from different research disciplines, including professionals from among other sectors the educational and cultural sectors, thus allowing for theorizing and bridging the dichotomies between monodisciplinary research areas and professional fields.

U Westminster PhD Studentships (UK)

FellowshipsThe University of Westminster is now part of the Technē AHRC Doctoral Training Partnership. The DTP has 57 full PhD studentships to give out each year over the next three years (beginning in Sept 2019) in the areas of the arts and humanities. The Westminster Forum for Languages and Linguistics would particularly welcome applications from prospective PhD candidates in their specialist areas in sociolinguistics and historical linguistics:

  • Historical study of the English Language
  • Language and gender
  • Language contact including creole languages
  • Migration, exile, language and spaces
  • Multilingualism including community/heritage languages

Children’s Picturebooks and Language Hierarchies (New Zealand)

Book NotesDaly, Nicola. (May 31, 2018). How children’s picturebooks can disrupt existing language hierarchiesThe Conversation.

“There are many factors that shape the value we place on different languages. Some languages seem more pleasant to listen to, easier to learn or more logical. These perceptions are generally influenced by our attitudes towards the speakers of a  and the different situations in which the language is spoken.

One reflection of the differential status of languages comes through in bilingual children’s picturebooks. Here I explore how te reo Māori (the indigenous language of New Zealand) is represented and argue that the way languages are displayed in bilingual picturebooks can disrupt the status quo.”

KANRAXËL: Film on Rural Multilingualism in Senegal

Job adsKANRAXËL: The Confluence of Agnack makes rural multilingualism visible by focusing on a city in Senegal where speaking 6 languages is not uncommon. Places like Agnack defy common conceptualisations of multilingualism, which tend to assume it is both modern and urban. Extensive discussion about the project and its implications has been made available, as are teaching materials both for secondary and university students.

In 2015, the film won the AHRC research in film award in the category “Best film produced by a researcher or research team in the last year.” The jury’s verdict states: this is “a beautifully filmed and scripted film… a highly sophisticated film, beautifully shot, cut, and recorded, which conveys the nature of multilingual life in the village very effectively indeed.”

 

CFP Linguistic Landscape and Educational Spaces

Publication OpportunitiesContributions are invited for an edited volume with the working title Linguistic Landscape and Educational Spaces in the series New Perspectives on Language and Education published by Multilingual Matters. The book will be edited by Edina Krompák, Víctor Fernández-Mallat and Stephan Meyer, with publication envisaged for 2019. Multilingual Matters has indicated strong interest in the collection, and we are now compiling a list of authors and abstracts to finalise an agreement with them. Prospective contributors are requested to submit an abstract by 31 May 2018. See attached PDF for details.

KC17 Multilingualism Translated into Greek

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#17: Multilingualism, which Josep Soler-Carbonell wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Rania Spiridakou has now translated into Greek. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC17 Multilingualism_GreekSoler-Carbonell, J. (2017). Multilingualism [Greek]. (R. Spiridakou, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 17. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/12/kc17-multilingualism_greek.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concept #17: Multilingualism Translated into Chinese

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#17: Multilingualism, which Josep Soler-Carbonell first published in English in 2014, and which Yan Qiu has now translated into Simplified Chinese. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC17 Multilingualism_Chinese-simSoler-Carbonell, J. (2017). Multilingualism [Simplified Chinese]. (Y. Qiu, Trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 17. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/kc17-multilingualism_chinese-sim.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

CFP 20th International Congress of Linguists (South Africa)

ConferencesCall for abstracts
20th International Congress of Linguists, 2-6 July, 2018, Cape Town, South Africa

Authors can now submit abstracts against any of the workshops or individual topics (i.e. “paper sessions”).

24 July 2017: Deadline for abstract submission
31 October 2017: Notification of abstract acceptance

The Congress is held every five years, and is meant to showcase current developments in Linguistics. The Congress will run over five days, have a plenary panel on linguistics in South Africa, nine plenary speakers covering a range of major sub-fields, 10 paper sessions each with its own focus speaker, up to 30 workshops, and several poster sessions. While speakers and topics are drawn from a wide international pool, ICL 20 will take the additional opportunity of showcasing African language research. It will also cover applied linguistic areas of research of vital importance to the African continent and the 21st century at large, with a special extended session on Multilingualism, Education, Policy and Development, and a 2 day workshop on New directions in World Englishes research.

 

Save