U Madrid Postdoc: Multilingualism, Social Identities, ICC (Spain)

PostdocsMarie Skłodowska-Curie Individual Fellowship: Multilingualism, Social Identities, Intercultural Relations and Communication. Department of General Linguistics, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Spain. Deadline: 14 July 2019.

MIRCo (Multilingualism, Social Identities, Intercultural Relations and Communication) is a consolidated international and interdisciplinary research group, based at the Autonomous University of Madrid (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid). Since 2000, MIRCo has been devoted to the study of multilingualism in its linguistic, discursive, social, political, economic and educational aspects, from a critical, interactional and ethnographic perspective. MIRCO seeks to obtain innovative answers, not only in theoretical terms but also regarding methods and applications, for example by addressing innovative strategies such as citizen science. Our goal is for MIRCO to become a space of encounter and connection between basic and applied research networks, at the Autonomous University of Madrid (UAM). The main lines of research are: Multilingualism and multilingual practices in different social áreas; speakers’ linguistic trajectories and models of speakerhood; discourse and power; intercultural communication and intercultural relations; and linguistic landscapes and the transformation of urban spaces through communicative practices.

MIRCo are looking forward to hosting postdocs with strong interest in language and society, and/or in discourse studies. The MIRCo Researh Group will provide a space for scientific exchange in which specialists from different fields coordinate and perform “frontier research.” Interested applicants should send an up-to-date CV and a brief summary of why they would like to join the MIRCO group to the contact person before July 15th, 2019.

CFP The Politics of Researching Multilingually

“PublicationCall for Chapters: The politics of researching multilingually, to be edited by Prue Holmes, Judith Reynolds, Sara Ganassin and published with Multilingual Matters. Deadline: 1 July 2019.

How researchers draw on their linguistic resources when they undertake their research is often impacted by institutional, contextual, and interpersonal politics, and this can be a salient issue for researchers working in multiple languages when they are planning, developing, conducting and/or writing up their research. This is especially the case as researchers undertake their work in conditions of migration as a result of poverty, precarity, conflict, and/or protracted crises—where languages are often overlooked, and their speakers silenced; or in other situations where languages and those who speak them may come into conflict with political regimes, and/or other forms of structural power and agency. Thus, when undertaking their research, researchers must make decisions about which language(s) to use, when, where, and why—decisions that are often politically charged.

These decisions may be influenced by multiple factors: the topic of the research; the contexts that shape the research; the relationships among the researcher and various stakeholders (e.g., supervisors and funders of the research, and gatekeepers such as governmental officials, non-governmental groups/employees and other community groups who determine access to the research site, resources, texts and other artefacts); the languages in play in the research context (whether national, minority, tribal, colonial, travelling languages, and lingua francas); and the languages of dissemination, e.g., for participants and stakeholders in the community, in theses (in the dominant national language only, or multiple languages), and in publications (e.g., in high impact journals which are often published in English). In this sense, the languages researchers employ in the research process, and how and when they draw on their linguistic resources, are as much politically influenced as they are culturally or linguistically.

KU Leuven PHD Fellowship: Interactional Linguistics/CA (Belgium)

“Fellowships“
PhD Fellowship, Interactional Linguistics/Conversation Analysis, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium. Deadline: 31 May 2019.

A new research project funded by the Research Foundation – Flanders (FWO) and the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNF) is looking for applicants for a fully funded four-year PhD fellowship in interactional linguistics/conversation analysis. The PhD fellowship is part of a larger collaborative project entitled “The first five words: Multilingual cities in Switzerland and Belgium and the grammar of language choice in public space”. The team heading the project is composed of Elwys De Stefani (KU Leuven) and Lorenza Mondada (University of Basel), as well as 4 PhD students. For the Flemish part of the project, the PhD fellows will be based at KU Leuven (Department of Linguistics).

This project studies how unacquainted persons spontaneously engage in interaction in multilingual cities in Belgium and Switzerland. The research will be based on video-recordings collected in various locations and address the following questions:

  • How can people engage in pro-social encounters without knowing in advance which language the other speaks? How do speakers decide, in the very first moments of the encounter, which language(s) they are going to use?

  • How do speakers orient to the multilingual setting in encounter openings? How do speakers align or disalign with a “basic code” proposed in the greeting?

  • Do urban public spaces represent “territories of multilingualism” in the speakers’ actual talk?

  • In public space, the beginning of an encounter emerges first of all through visible embodied behaviour; what is the relation between the organisation of visible embodied conduct and the politics of multilingualism?

The above questions are crucial for research on multilingualism, but also for contemporary societies in general. The project thus highlights the foundations of co-sociality, and the conditions for pro-social encounters between strangers (possibly speaking different languages).

U Westminster MPhil/PHD Studentships Linguistics (UK)

“Studentships“MPhil or PHD Studentships, School of Humanities, University of Westminster, London, UK. Deadline: 17 May 2019.

The School of Humanities at the University of Westminster is offering two studentships, including a fee waiver of home/EU fees* and stipend of £16,777 per annum for three years full-time study, to commence in either September 2019 or January 2020. The School of Humanities, based in the University’s historic Regent Street building, offers a vibrant, multidisciplinary research environment with a well-established PhD programme in, or across, a wide range of disciplines, including Contemporary Chinese Studies, English Language, English Literature, French and Francophone Studies, History, Linguistics, Museums and Heritage, Translation Studies, Visual Culture and Cultural Studies.

The Westminster Forum for Languages and Linguistics would particularly welcome applications from prospective PhD candidates in their specialist areas in sociolinguistics and historical linguistics:

  • Multilingualism including community/heritage languages
  • Migration, exile, language and spaces
  • Language contact including creole languages
  • Language and gender
  • Historical study of the English language

To discuss informally where your research idea might fit within these specialisms, or for queries about any aspect of the application process, please contact Dr Helen Glew.

Competition: Visual Representations of Multilingualism

AwardsCompetition for visual representations of multilingualism. Deadline: 29 March 2019.

BAAL (British Association for Applied Linguistics) is looking for applied linguists and visual artists to submit visual representations of multilingualism as part of an international competition.

This competition aims to provide a creative opportunity to explore new ways of representing multilingualism through visual means and to stimulate debate and raise awareness about innovative ways of thinking about multilingualism.

Multilingualism has often failed to be represented, or – when it has been represented – this has been done through the co-presence of a select number of languages. However, this raises the question of which languages are represented and why, while recent research about multilingual practices, for example translanguaging, has questioned traditional views of languages as discrete systems. This research has also highlighted the multilingual language user’s capacity to create an apparently seamless flow between named languages and language varieties to achieve effective and meaningful communication in everyday social interaction.

BAAL’s interests are in how applied linguists and artists represent these new ways of thinking about multilingualism creatively and visually and how these images communicate the message about dynamic multilingualism to the public. The competition is open to artists, designers and/or applied linguists working in a range of 2D practices, including, but not limited to: drawing, painting, illustration, graphic design, collage, digital, photography, etc. Sculptural/relief works presented in a 2D format will also be accepted.  Collaborations between artists and applied linguists, and submissions from students of all levels are particularly welcome.

CFP Multilingualism & Identity (UK)

ConferencesMultilingualism and Identity: Interdisciplinary Perspectives, 11-13 September 2019, University of Cambridge, UK. Deadline: 4 February 2019.

Globalisation and migration are two of the most important phenomena in the early 21st century and bring with them a number of opportunities and challenges, not least in terms of how people communicate and learn in new environments, both real and online. As a result of the rise in the movement of people and in interconnectivity more generally, an already multilingual world is becoming even more multilingual. How people use and develop their linguistic repertoires has been the subject of much scholarly attention. Less attention has been paid, however, to the ways in which people identify themselves and are identified by others as multilingual. This conference brings together researchers in applied linguistics, sociolinguistics, modern languages and education studies to explore multilingualism and identity from a variety of perspectives, with the aim of creating new synergies.

Abstracts are invited for presentations at the conference. Papers should address explicitly issues of identity and multilingualism. Organizers particularly welcome submissions which take an interdisciplinary approach to the topic. Conference organised by Linda Fisher and Wendy Ayres-Bennett as part of the AHRC funded OWRI research project, Multilingualism: Empowering Individuals, Transforming Societies (MEITS).

CFP Multilingualism Diversity & Democracy (Sweden)

ConferencesCALL FOR PAPER ABSTRACTS: Multilingualism, Diversity and Democracy (MuDD) Conference 2019, Jönköping University, Sweden, 8-10 April 2019. Deadline: 15 January 2019.

An international conference organized by the Communication, Culture and Diversity (CCD) network-based research group, School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University, and sponsored by the Swedish Research Council.

The MuDD2019 international conference will bring together international experts from across the global-North and the global-South with the intent of interrogating the continuing dichotomized situation (in particular in nation-states like Sweden) wherein mono-lingualism and mono-culturalism constitutes the norm and multilingualism and diversity are seen as the exception. MuDD2019 also has the potential to create new knowledge of relevance for present day challenges related to mobility, migration and communication across virtual-physical spaces. It will bring together senior and junior scholars from different research disciplines, including professionals from among other sectors the educational and cultural sectors, thus allowing for theorizing and bridging the dichotomies between monodisciplinary research areas and professional fields.

U Westminster PhD Studentships (UK)

“Studentships“The University of Westminster is now part of the Technē AHRC Doctoral Training Partnership. The DTP has 57 full PhD studentships to give out each year over the next three years (beginning in Sept 2019) in the areas of the arts and humanities. The Westminster Forum for Languages and Linguistics would particularly welcome applications from prospective PhD candidates in their specialist areas in sociolinguistics and historical linguistics:

  • Historical study of the English Language
  • Language and gender
  • Language contact including creole languages
  • Migration, exile, language and spaces
  • Multilingualism including community/heritage languages

Children’s Picturebooks and Language Hierarchies (New Zealand)

Book NotesDaly, Nicola. (May 31, 2018). How children’s picturebooks can disrupt existing language hierarchiesThe Conversation.

“There are many factors that shape the value we place on different languages. Some languages seem more pleasant to listen to, easier to learn or more logical. These perceptions are generally influenced by our attitudes towards the speakers of a  and the different situations in which the language is spoken.

One reflection of the differential status of languages comes through in bilingual children’s picturebooks. Here I explore how te reo Māori (the indigenous language of New Zealand) is represented and argue that the way languages are displayed in bilingual picturebooks can disrupt the status quo.”

KANRAXËL: Film on Rural Multilingualism in Senegal

Job adsKANRAXËL: The Confluence of Agnack makes rural multilingualism visible by focusing on a city in Senegal where speaking 6 languages is not uncommon. Places like Agnack defy common conceptualisations of multilingualism, which tend to assume it is both modern and urban. Extensive discussion about the project and its implications has been made available, as are teaching materials both for secondary and university students.

In 2015, the film won the AHRC research in film award in the category “Best film produced by a researcher or research team in the last year.” The jury’s verdict states: this is “a beautifully filmed and scripted film… a highly sophisticated film, beautifully shot, cut, and recorded, which conveys the nature of multilingual life in the village very effectively indeed.”