KC17 Multilingualism Translated into Italian

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#17: Multilingualism, which Josep Soler wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Karin Martin has now translated into Italian.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized alphabetically by conceptchronologically by publication date and number, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC17 Multilingualism_ItalianSoler, J. (2021). Multilinguismo. (K. Martin, Trans.). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 17. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2021/08/kc17-multilingualism_italian.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Karin Martin Profile

Profiles

Dr. Karin Martin is Senior Researcher and Lecturer in Italian Language and Culture at the Carinthia University of Applied Sciences in Carinthia, Austria, as well as being an Entrepreneurial Linguist.

Karin MartinMartin specializes in Multilingualism and Foreign Language Learning Difficulties. She teaches Italian Language and Culture to Intercultural Management bachelor students. She works and conducts research in the field of societal change, multilingualism and interculturalism. Her field of expertise lies in promoting multilingualism in education and in society. She supports and assists families who move around the world for different reasons and raise their children with more than one language.

She is also a Dyslexia Trainer and wrote her doctoral thesis about dyslexia, foreign language learning and bilingualism. Martin is a native Italian who has lived and worked in Italy, Germany, Spain and France. She currently lives and works in the South of Austria.


Work for CID:

Karin Martin translated KC17: Multilingualism into Italian.

KC17 Multilingualism Translated into French

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#17: Multilingualism, which Josep Soler wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Mohammed Guamguami has now translated into French.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized alphabetically by conceptchronologically by publication date and number, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC17 Multilingualism_FrenchSoler, J. (2021). Le multilinguisme. (M. Guamguami, Trans.). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 17. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2021/06/kc17-multilingualism_french.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

KC17 Multilingualism Translated into Spanish

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#17: Multilingualism, which Josep Soler wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which  Jhon Eduardo Mosquera Pérez has now translated into Spanish.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized alphabetically by conceptchronologically by publication date and number, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC17 Multilingualism_SpanishSoler, J. (2021). Multilingüismo. (J. E. Mosquera Pérez, Trans.). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 17. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2021/01/kc17-multilingualism_spanish.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

International Conference on Multilingualism (Greece)

Conferences

Call for speakers, International Conference on Multilingualism, 29 March 2020, Athens, Greece.

The International Conference on Multilingualism officially launches the first annual meeting of professionals and the general public, with an interest in both bilingualism and multilingualism. It aims to bring together leading authors, influencers, scientists, academics, and educators who focus on research and methods, as well as the benefits and the pitfalls of raising bilingual and multilingual children.

CFP GURT 2020: Multilingualism – Global South and North (USA)

ConferencesCall for Papers: Georgetown University Round Table 2020, Multilingualism: Global South and Global North Perspectives, March 13-15, 2020, Georgetown University, Washington D.C. Deadline: October 15, 2019.

The world has always been predominantly multilingual, but in recent decades globalization and the attendant processes of mobility and technologization have catapulted multilingualism into unprecedented levels of public and academic attention. Benefits of multilingualism are actively investigated across neurocognitive, academic, economic, and social domains. At the same time, misunderstanding and mismanagement of multilingualism have also been shown by research to curtail the educational, socioeconomic, and personal opportunities of multilingual individuals, families, and communities. Today’s multilingualism can be the site for overt and covert oppression, a lived experience that is a gift for some and a curse for others, patterning along structural forces related to inequitable distribution of material and symbolic resources in the world, and rooted in histories of (post)colonial domination and human mobility. In light of these paradoxes, research must be able to account for both multilingual learning and multilingual practices at different nested levels – societies, schools and classrooms, communities and families, minds and brains – while never losing sight of material, ideological, and geopolitical inequities. Moreover, the dynamics of multilingualism can vary across diverse Global South and Global North contexts in ways that create resonances and differences and demand innovative research lenses. Reflecting this complex agenda, GURT 2020 will focus on the relation between multilingual learning and multilingual practices, globalization, and social justice with two goals: (a) to bring together research on multilingualism spanning the full spectrum of psycholinguistic-cognitive and sociolinguistic-critical approaches and (b) to facilitate dialogue about multilingualism as it is lived and investigated across diverse contexts in the Global North and the Global South.

CFP Multilingual Awareness and Multilingual Practices (Netherlands)

ConferencesCall for proposals: Multilingual Awareness and Multilingual Practices (MAMP19), 28-29 October, 2019, Thomas More University of Applied Sciences, Antwerp, the Netherlands. Deadline: 31 August 2019.

The conference considers all aspects of the linguistic and sociolinguistic competences and practices of bi-/multilingual speakers who cross existing social and linguistic boundaries, adopting or adapting themselves to new and overlapping linguistic spaces. Organizers invite papers in all areas of research in bi-/multilingualism, whether or not linked directly to the overarching conference theme, including, but not limited to, linguistics, sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, neurolinguistics, clinical linguistics, education, bi-/multilingual societies.

CFP Monolingualism & Multilingualism (Netherlands)

ConferencesCall for Papers: AILA 2020 (World Congress of Applied Linguistics) Symposium: S169: Tensions between monolingualism and multilingualism across university contexts, 9-14 August 2020, Groningen, The Netherlands. Deadline: September 16, 2019.

Organizers Maria Kuteeva (Stockholm University), Niina Hynninen (Helsinki University) and Kathrin Kaufhold (Stockholm University) invite submissions to two half-day sessions focusing on two major themes:

1) Discourses of monolingualism and multilingualism, and
2) Stakeholders’ perceptions of monolingualism and multilingualism.

The symposium aims to explore language perceptions and practices in multilingual university settings focusing on:
• tensions between discourses of monolingualism versus multilingualism;
• the dialectics between perceiving and experiencing languages as separable objects and translingual practices; and
• language-regulatory mechanisms and practices involving different stakeholders.

NOTE: There are another 16 symposia planned for this conference on various aspects of multilingualism.

U Madrid Postdoc: Multilingualism, Social Identities, ICC (Spain)

PostdocsMarie Skłodowska-Curie Individual Fellowship: Multilingualism, Social Identities, Intercultural Relations and Communication. Department of General Linguistics, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Spain. Deadline: 14 July 2019.

MIRCo (Multilingualism, Social Identities, Intercultural Relations and Communication) is a consolidated international and interdisciplinary research group, based at the Autonomous University of Madrid (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid). Since 2000, MIRCo has been devoted to the study of multilingualism in its linguistic, discursive, social, political, economic and educational aspects, from a critical, interactional and ethnographic perspective. MIRCO seeks to obtain innovative answers, not only in theoretical terms but also regarding methods and applications, for example by addressing innovative strategies such as citizen science. Our goal is for MIRCO to become a space of encounter and connection between basic and applied research networks, at the Autonomous University of Madrid (UAM). The main lines of research are: Multilingualism and multilingual practices in different social áreas; speakers’ linguistic trajectories and models of speakerhood; discourse and power; intercultural communication and intercultural relations; and linguistic landscapes and the transformation of urban spaces through communicative practices.

MIRCo are looking forward to hosting postdocs with strong interest in language and society, and/or in discourse studies. The MIRCo Researh Group will provide a space for scientific exchange in which specialists from different fields coordinate and perform “frontier research.” Interested applicants should send an up-to-date CV and a brief summary of why they would like to join the MIRCO group to the contact person before July 15th, 2019.

CFP The Politics of Researching Multilingually

“PublicationCall for Chapters: The politics of researching multilingually, to be edited by Prue Holmes, Judith Reynolds, Sara Ganassin and published with Multilingual Matters. Deadline: 1 July 2019.

How researchers draw on their linguistic resources when they undertake their research is often impacted by institutional, contextual, and interpersonal politics, and this can be a salient issue for researchers working in multiple languages when they are planning, developing, conducting and/or writing up their research. This is especially the case as researchers undertake their work in conditions of migration as a result of poverty, precarity, conflict, and/or protracted crises—where languages are often overlooked, and their speakers silenced; or in other situations where languages and those who speak them may come into conflict with political regimes, and/or other forms of structural power and agency. Thus, when undertaking their research, researchers must make decisions about which language(s) to use, when, where, and why—decisions that are often politically charged.

These decisions may be influenced by multiple factors: the topic of the research; the contexts that shape the research; the relationships among the researcher and various stakeholders (e.g., supervisors and funders of the research, and gatekeepers such as governmental officials, non-governmental groups/employees and other community groups who determine access to the research site, resources, texts and other artefacts); the languages in play in the research context (whether national, minority, tribal, colonial, travelling languages, and lingua francas); and the languages of dissemination, e.g., for participants and stakeholders in the community, in theses (in the dominant national language only, or multiple languages), and in publications (e.g., in high impact journals which are often published in English). In this sense, the languages researchers employ in the research process, and how and when they draw on their linguistic resources, are as much politically influenced as they are culturally or linguistically.